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Decades of Horror / 1980's / 1970's / Horror News Radio / Monster Movie Podcast / Hannibal Fan Podcat / The Classic Era / American Horror Story Fan Podcast
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Now displaying: 2017
Nov 9, 2017

Jeff Mohr jumped at the opportunity to review Radius (2017) when he saw it on the Gruesome Magazine review board. The film was right in his wheelhouse: a Sci-Fi thriller with a WTF premise and a couple WTF plot twists. Either or both of the two stars - Diego Klattenhoff (The Blacklist, Homeland, Pacific Rim) and Charlotte Sullivan (Chicago Fire, Rookie Blue, The Colony) - are on screen for nearly the entire film and do excellent jobs taking their characters through a series of developments and revelations. The poster tagline,  "Don't get too close," is a downright sneaky indicator of what's to come without giving too much away. In Radius, writers/directors Caroline Labrèche and Steeve Léonard have crafted a layered, slow-burn, Sci-Fi thriller that is well written, directed, shot, and acted. Seek it out!

Nov 9, 2017

Chicago was home to Cinepocalypse from November 2 through November 9, 2017. One of the 60 films screening at this incredible film festival was The Terror of Hallow's Eve (2017) from director Todd Tucker along with co-writers Ronald L. Halvas and Zack Ward. The film features Eric Roberts as neighbor Ed and Doug Jones under the make-up of two top-notch creations, The Trickster and a creepy Scarecrow. The film stars Caleb Thomas, Sarah Lancaster, Annie Read, JT Neal, Mcabe Greg, and Niko Papastefanou. The film shines when it plays to its strengths: the special effects and its 80s vibe. The story loses interest the more it focuses on its lead and his unconvincing and typical 80s motivations, leading to the usual revenge-themed mayhem. The ending also does the film little favor as it veers into a second storyline that feels more like padding than a needed twist or turn.

Click here for more about Cinepocalypse.

Nov 9, 2017

oin the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era Grue Crew for this episode – Erin Miskell, Jeff Mohr, and Joseph Perry – as we take our second journey in a row to Transylvania this time take in the silent scream splendor of Nosferatu (1922), the first cinematic version of Bram Stoker’s classic novel Dracula.

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 21 – Nosferatu (1922)

Nosferatu is most definitely based on Bram Stoker’s novel, but it is just as definitely an unofficial version. The filmmakers intentionally avoided obtaining the rights from the Stoker family, hence, the names along with a few other details, were changed to protect the not-so-innocent. As a result of their unsuccessful subterfuge, Dracula becomes Count Orlok/Nosferatu (Max Schreck), Harker is converted to Hutter (Gustav von Wangenheim), Mina is replaced by Ellen (Greta Schröder), Renfield is changed to Knock (Alexander Granach), and a new way to kill the undead is devised.

Directed by German expressionist legend F. W. Murnau, Nosferatu reinforces the director’s reputation as master of shadows. Jeff marvels at the shadows and shot composition of nearly every scene. This episode’s Grue Crew all agree that Henrik Galeen’s screenplay loses much of the character depth present in Stoker’s novel. Produced by Enrico Dieckmann and Albin Grau, Nosferatu was most influenced by Grau who also served as art director and costume designer, and even created some of the poster art.

It is hard to imagine Max Schreck as a normal human being after witnessing his portrayal of Count Orlok. In fact, many people over the years have speculated he was a real vampire.

Joseph makes sure we discuss Alexander Granach’s performance. His version of Knock seems to have set the mold for future portrayals of Renfield. Erin expresses her concerns for the dangers of one-dimensional female characters, such as Ellen, who represent pure good and whose only purpose throughout the film is to sacrifice herself for the benefit of everyone else.

All in all, they all agree. If you haven’t seen Nosferatu (1922), what’s the hold-up?

We plan to release a new episode every other week. The next episode in our very flexible schedule is another James Whale classic, The Old Dark House (1932), selected and hosted by Chad Hunt.

Please let us know what you think of Decades of Horror: The Classic Era and what films you’d like to hear us cover! We want to hear from you! After all, without you, we’re just four nutjobs talking about the films we love. Send us an email  (chadhunt@gruesomemagazine.com, erinmiskell@gruesomemagazine.com, jeffmohr@gruesomemagazine.com, or josephperry@gruesomemagazine.com) or leave us a message, a review, or a comment at GruesomeMagazine.com, iTunes, Stitcher, the Horror News Radio App, or the Horror News Radio Facebook group.

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you for listening!

Nov 8, 2017

Paul Cardullo returns to discuss another Film Festival Favorite, Family Possessions (2017) from director Tommy Faircloth. We've covered the film before online and in our Gruesome Magazine print edition but Paul provides a new perspective from not only GenreBlast Film Festival but from Wreak Havoc Film Festival as well and compares the two experience giving this review a unique perspective. The film feature two familiar genre names from the Eighties, Mark Patton from A Nightmare on Elm Street 2: Freddy's Revenge and Felissa Rose from Sleepaway Camp. It also features up and coming stars from past Faircloth films Elizabeth Mears, Jason Vail, and Leah Wiseman in the starring role. Andrew Wicklum and Erika Edwards also make a strong impression in this terrific thriller.

Nov 6, 2017

Vanessa returns with another killer review of a supernatural horror film. This time it is Live-Evil (2017) from director Ari Kirschenbaum. The film features Charlene Amoia, Vladimir Kulich, and Tony Todd. Vanessa praises the film's spirit, tone, and artistry. She dives into the demons and the dead, mentioning Eddie from Iron Maiden along the way. Listen to the review below to discover why the film and its murder-mystery vibe connects with Vanessa so strongly.

Nov 6, 2017

"You ungodly warlock! Because of you this hotel and this town will be cursed forever!" An angry mob storms the hotel of Schweick (Antoine Saint-John), a warlock trying to keep the 7th doorway to hell at bay. Or whatever the hell is happening in this opening as he's covered in queso. The Beyond - like many a Lucio Fulci film - takes liberties with logic and forward momentum in story. There's a lot more emphasis on the horror of the images rather than a traditional narrative structure. It's an acquired taste. But who amongst the Decades of Horror 1980s crew acquired this taste? Listen to find out!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 123 – The Beyond (1981)

The Beyond is the middle chapter in Fulci's Gates of Hell trilogy, following Gates of Hell (or City of the Living Dead) and just before The House By The Cemetery. While a loose trilogy, each has a Giallo sensibility that combines bright gore with nonsensical narratives. Outside of the basic premise of a young lady Liza (Catriona MacColl) inheriting a hotel that has a gateway to Hell, The Beyond is mainly an excuse for the madness to unfold. Tarantulas bite a guy's face. A woman's face melts after being covered in acid in front of her daughter. Zombies attack for no real discernable reason.

So, does this sit well with the Decades of Horror crew? Well, Doc Rotten is a tried and true Fulci fan, though he admits that the Italian legend frustrated him initially. Christopher G. Moore and Thomas Mariani admit they aren't as up on their Italian horror. Christopher has some trouble with the dream logic and lack of consistency in the characters. Thomas can see that, but revels in the unintentional hilarity at play. It's a brazen frank discussion about auteur theory, gore and the grammatical errors of "Do Not Entry." Make sure to go Beyond the extra mile and listen to it all!

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Next Episode

Our Patreon Poll Winner: Q The Winged Serpent (1982)

Nov 5, 2017

"Boy, have we got a vacation for you...where nothing can possibly go wrong..." - the tagline for the 1973 theatrical version of Michael Crichton's Westworld sets the movie up perfectly. Richard Benjamin and James Brolin star as friends who visit Western World to play out a fantasy vacation living in the wild, wild West. Yul Brynner is cast as The Gunslinger, a rogue cowboy dressed in all black who continually tries to gun down our heroes. Paul Cardullo joins Doc at the Retro Films Series at the Carolina Theater in Durham, North Carolina for a James Brolin double feature (more on the second feature in a future review). Find out how this classic which inspired the hit HBO series of the same name holds up 42 years later and on the big screen. Also, to paraphrase Paul, "You haven't seen anything until you have seen Dick Van Patten in a bar fight..." Check out Paul's review below.

 

Nov 4, 2017

Without even knowing it, Doc gets revenge on Jeff Mohr for suggesting Night of the Lepus as a Decades of Horror 1970s topic. In the spirit of that campy classing, mixing in elements of classic Eighties schlock Critters and Killer Klowns from Outer Spaces comes Cute Little Buggers (2017) from director Tony Jopia. Jeff is on board, armed with bottles of "Bugger Killer" to review the film about killer bunnies hungry for human flesh and primed to repopulate the world alien style. Oh, my. Jeff shares his appreciation for the plot, the effort, and the inclusion of Caroline Munro in an extended cameo role but confesses that much of the film is lost on him, disliking the film but selling it all the while. Check out his review below.

Nov 2, 2017

The Grue Crew is stuck in the traps of JIGSAW but doesn't seem to be too bothered since he at least switched Netflix on to stream STRANGER THINGS Season 2. Yes, the show everyone's talking about and the film series people cringe from vague memories of are here as fodder for the Horror News Radio crew. Joining them is award-winning filmmaker Christopher G. Moore, who suffers through the elaborate traps to get the sweet relief of his favorite show still running. But is everyone in agreement? Listen to Horror News Radio to find out! Dave Dreher also slips in some Horror News of the Week, in where we discuss the return of John Carpenter to the director's chair, ghosts crossing with Helen Mirren in the Winchester trailer and Rob Zombie resurrecting The Firefly Family. Oh, what horrors indeed!

As always, the HNR Grue-Crew would love to hear from you, the listeners, the fans. You can always reach out via email at feedback(AT)horrornewsradio(DOT)com or find us on Twitter: Doc Rotten | Dave Dreher | Thomas Mariani. Also, like us on Facebook and join the Horror News Radio Facebook Group.

Horror News Radio
Episode 239 – Stranger Things Season 2 (2017) – Jigsaw (2017)
Subscribe – iTunes – Facebook – Stitcher

SHOW NOTES

INTRO [00:00:39]

HORROR NEWS OF THE WEEK [00:04:57]

FEATURE REVIEW: JIGSAW [00:27:37]

  • Jigsaw (2017)
  • director: The Spierig Brothers
  • cast: Tobin Bell, Mandela Van Peebles, Matt Passmore, Callum Keith Rennie, Cle Bennett, Laura Vandervoot

CONTEST: GIVEAWAYS! [01:08:57]

  • The Barn Blu Ray Giveaway
    • Favorite 80s MOVIE MONSTER
    • Submit to media(AT)gruesomemagazine(DOT)com with the subject line “The Barn”
    • Open to U.S. residents only
  • Comet TV Giveaway
    • Favorite line from the ROBOCOP Trilogy
    • Submit to media(AT)gruesomemagazine(DOT)com with the subject line “Robocop”
    • Open to U.S. residents only

WHAT HAVE YOU BEEN WATCHING: STRANGER THINGS SEASON 2 (2017) [01:11:13]

  • Stranger Things Season 2 (2017)
  • creators: The Duffer Brothers
  • cast: Finn Wolfhard, Millie Bobbie Brown, Caleb McLaughlin, Gaten Mazzarotto, David Harbour, Sean Astin, Paul Reiser

FEEDBACK/SUPPORT HNR [01:56:23]

  • Patrons who donate as low as $1 have until November 5th to vote for the next Decades of Horror 1980s at our Patreon Page.
  • Thanks to Tear Out the Heart and Victory Records for use of the song Undead Anthem for the intro and outro of the HNR podcast

HNR LINKS:

Nov 2, 2017

Marvel returns to Asgard with Thor: Ragnarok (2017), the third in the Thor series of films. However, this addition to the franchise brings far more spirit, color, life, and humor to the sometimes stiff characters. Director Taika Waititi along with writers Eric Pearson, Craig Kyle, and Christopher Yost may have created the most accessible and hilarious Marvel Cinematic Universe movie thus far. While the plot is a bit thin and may waste its opportunity to spotlight Cate Blanchette as Hela, the Goddess of Death, it makes up for that with a terrific cast full of energy and charisma. Chris Hemsworth turns his Thor on end with a brilliant comedic performance while maintaining the action hero elements. Tom Hiddleston returns as fan-favorite Loki and never misses an opportunity to shine. Mark Ruffalo guest-stars as Bruce Banner (and the Incredible Hulk) while Tessa Thompson steals the film as Valkyrie. The film is full of surprises and delights and will surely entertain its audience. Thor: Ragnarok is solid gold! Check out the review from Doc Rotten below with guest review by Christopher G. Moore.

Nov 2, 2017

"This is indeed a disturbing universe." Maggie Simpson (James Earl Jones) gives us one of many great quotes the recite endlessly. The Simpsons Treehouse of Horror episodes are just a sliver of the legacy this titan of a show has left behind. With over 600 episodes in nearly 30 years of time, our favorite yellow-skinned cartoon family has seen a lot of things. Celebrity cameos, world-changing event & a gradual dip in quality. The works. Now, join Decades of Horror 1990s and Beyond for a journey through all of the anthology Halloween episodes that have aired from 1990 all the way to the most recent 28th entry as the October haunts season concludes!

Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond
Episode 29 – The Simpsons Treehouse of Horror Retrospective (1990 - 2017)

The Simpsons Treehouse of Horror is has been an annual staple for America's longest-running sitcom since it's second season. Starting off with segments that adapt Edgar Allen Poe or parody Amityville HorrorThe Simpsons certainly has changed in the intervening years. The segments have grown more gruesome, the parodies more modern and the jokes... few and far between? I know. Someone saying The Simpsons has declined in quality on the internet. Shocker! Still, Simpsons THOH episodes always have something curious about them even at their absolute worst. The animation is usually quite elaborate, turning Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa, Maggie & all our favorite Springfieldians into something off-kilter and Alf Clausen's music was always an ethereal joy.

To talk about the good, the bad and the ugly of all this, Thomas Mariani has recruited three terrifying treehouse dwellers and fellow lifelong The Simpsons fans Yonathan Habtemichael, Kaycee Jarrard and Scott Johnson. All three describe their passionate love for the classic years before groaning (and in some cases, sticking up for) the modern years that are so derided. Simpsons THOH segments of old are praised for their consistent laughs, imagination, and cultural impact. More modern stories are... given a bit less praise. Yet, there's still some love to go around for underrated gems and for the most peculiar episode: a Halloween Simpsons episode that is an anthology with no continuity?! Well, if you asked how that happened... a wizard did it. Happy Halloween Everybody... oh, it's November 1st? D'OH!

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or tweet Thomas @NotTheWhosTommy. Also, make sure to give us some love via iTunes reviews and ratings. Helps us get more notice along the way.

The intro and outro is “Suck City” by Black Math. Look for more of their music via Free Music Archive.

Next Episode

Batman Returns (1992)

 

 

Oct 31, 2017

Things get rough for our brave reviewer, Paul Cardullo, as he settles in to watch...and review...the grindhouse horror wannabe, Halloween Pussy Trap Kill Kill (2017). He is so distraught after seeing this mess of a film he even hangs the good Doc out to dry for handing him the film to review in the first place. Oh, noes. The disappointment continues as the film's title suggests a kindred spirit to Russ Meyer's classic Faster Pussycat! Kill Kill (1965). Sadly, it is not. Ah, but director Jared Cohn (Atlantic Rim, 12/12/12, The Domicile) gives it a solid try. Find out how close he gets with Paul's review below. Oh, yeah, and score one for including Richard Grieco...

Oct 31, 2017

The selection at the 2017 edition of the New York City Horror Film Festival was spectacular. Opening the Halloween weekend event is the psychological horror thriller 3 (2017) from director Lou Simon. Rafe Telsch steps in to provide his take on this little gem praising the film as a model of what other independent filmmakers should follow and give high marks for actor Mike Stanley. And, yes, Rafe does explain the meaning of the film's simple one-word title, 3. Check out his review below.

Oct 30, 2017

Throughout October, Netflix has been providing genre fans with an ample amount of horror content from Stranger Things Season 2 to The Babysitter and so much more. Jeff Mohr is here to give his review of yet another Stephen King adaptation, the haunting film 1922 (2017) from director Zak Hilditch. The film features Thomas Jane, Molly Parker, Dylan Schmid, and Neal McDonough. While not at graphic as It or some other King films, it is no less harrowing and gripping. 1922 owes much of its success to the terrific performance from its lead Thomas Jane who, much like Carla Gugino in Gerald's Game, gives the performance of his career calling back to the quality of his role in The Mist. Jeff even suggests that this may be even better than the critically praised Gerald's Game which premiered on Netflix just a few short weeks prior. Halloween 2017 has been a good month for horror.

Oct 30, 2017

 

“You are now in my domain gentlemen, and you shall not leave.” Doc Rotten is still on hiatus, diligently working on the next issue of the Gruesome Magazine quarterly print and electronic editions, but Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr are back, along with guest-host Joey Fittos, to take that familiar journey from Transylvania to England, this time as told by producer/director Dan Curtis in 1974’s Dracula.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 61 – Dracula (1974)

Originally released as Bram Stoker’s Dracula until the rights to that name were acquired for Francis Ford Coppola’s 1992 version, the film is now sometimes referred to as Dan Curtis’ Dracula. This TV movie was scheduled to premiere in October 1973 but was preempted by news coverage of an unfolding historical event and rescheduled for February 1974.

This episode’s Grue Crew discuss Emmy winner Curtis’ start as the creator and executive producer of the daytime, horror/soap opera Dark Shadows (1966-71). He then went on to direct and produce a number of horror-related movies in the 1970s: The Night Stalker (1972) and The Night Strangler (1973), several TV-movie adaptations of well-known horror novels, and the theatrically released Burnt Offerings (1976).

Though your hosts find the script lacking in places, they do give props to frequent Curtis collaborator and horror icon Richard Matheson, who penned the screenplay for this version of Dracula. Despite this script’s faults, Curtis and Matheson do use a plot device lifted from Dark Shadows that doesn’t appear in Bram Stoker’s novel or any previous film versions but is used again by Coppola in Bram Stoker’s Dracula.

Academy Award winner Jack Palance tackles the title role. Curtis and he had worked together before on another TV movie, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1968). Chad, Bill, and especially Jeff, appreciate the feral quality of Palance’s performance, but Joey says, “He’s not my Dracula.” The rest of the cast - Nigel Davenport (Van Helsing), Murray Brown (Jonathan Harker), Fiona Lewis (Lucy), Penelope Horner (Mina), and Simon Ward (Arthur) - don’t have much to work with, possibly leading to their seemingly lackluster performances. The crew also point out that many of our listeners may recognize Sarah Douglas, one of Dracula’s brides, who later played Ursa in Superman (1978) and Superman II (1980).

When all's said and done, Mr. Fittos gives Dracula (1974) thumbs down. Though Chad and Jeff admit it doesn’t hold up to impressions from their first viewings, the other hosts think it is worth the watch for Palance’s performance.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

 

Oct 30, 2017

"You are weird. Thank God you're weird. The last one was so normal, it was disgusting." Elizabeth Solley (Jamie Lee Curtis) loves herself some weirdos. Including the weirdest man of all: Tom Atkins without a mustache! Halloween is getting pretty foggy for Decades of Horror 1980s as they one of the first horror films of the decade: John Carpenter's The Fog. Hopefully, our intrepid hosts can avoid being sucked in the misty moors of Antonio Bay in time for the 100th-anniversary celebration. Or, the very least, with enough time to catch Stevie Wayne's (Adrienne Barbeau) late-night broadcast. Join us as the Halloween Haunts season ends!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 122 – The Fog (1980)

The Fog is pretty interesting on a career path level for Carpenter. Post the major success of Halloween, but before he would rule the 1980s with a varying amount of genre work. The Fog sticks out a bit more. A ghost story without much gore, inst of ad using atmosphere to build up the tension rather than excessive violence that would color the slasher craze later that very year. It's an ethereal spooky example of how to build up the environment of Antonio Bay, allowing for silhouettes of the monsters to play horrific tricks on our eyes and creep us out just when it's too late.

To discuss everything The Fog, Christopher G. Moore, Doc Rotten and Thomas Mariani discuss everything in the misty moors that remain unseen. They debate the effectiveness of some of these characters, how much this is a Carpenter movie and ask where the ghost of Atkins' moustache really is. Plus, they wonder just how American Christopher Lee could possibly be. It's a spooky Halloween edition you won't want to miss! Stay in and tune the radio from Stevie Wayne's channel to hear it all!

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Also, don't forget our Patreon Poll where people who contribute as low as $1 a month can pick the second episode of Decades of Horror 1980s! Voting ends November 5th.

Next Episode

The Beyond (1981)

Oct 29, 2017

John Kramer returns - as does the Saw series - with Jigsaw (2017) from the Spierig Brothers (Michael Spierig and Peter Spierig), the directors behind Undead, Daybreakers, Predestination, and the upcoming Winchester: The House That Ghosts Builts. Tobin Bell returns in the title role while his costars Matt Passmore, Callum Keith Rennie, Hannah Emily Anderson, Cle Bennet, Laura Vandervoort, and Paul Braunstein attempt to survive the night. Rafe Telsch steps up to tackle the latest theatrical release and shares his thoughts on the film and how is sizes up the previous seven films in the franchise that once owned Halloween. Check out the review below.

Oct 29, 2017

Paul Cardullo returns with another edition of Groovy Gory Gruesome Gold with a killer Blu-ray release from Arrow Film, the iconic and legendary splatterfest Blood Feast (1963) from the Godfather of Gore, Herschell Gordon Lewis. Paul shares his love for this film and this edition. The film holds up surprisingly well...for what it is and the special features are well worth the Blu-ray, which includes a second 1963 feature from the maverick director, Scum of the Earth. Check out Paul's review below.

Oct 27, 2017

Close Calls (2017) from writer-director Richard Stringham lands on the Gruesome Magazine desk via the New York City Horror Film Festival. The movie is part of the festival's opening night, October 27, 2017. Doc Rotten joins Paul Cardullo with a review of the film, citing its heavy Eighties feel and approach as one of the film's stronger qualities. The film has fun with its gore and story, planting its tongue firmly in its cheek but steering clear of outright parody. The film succeeds in this approach. But, what it is more notable in is the potential star-making turn with its lead actress Jordan Phipps. Check out the review to hear more.

Oct 26, 2017

Halloween comes in hot and cold for The Grue Crew. On one side of the pillow is the cool horrendousness of The Snowman, the latest thriller from Tomas Alfredson (Let The Right One In) that has everyone talking... for the wrong reasons. On the other side is Leatherface, the latest prequel for the Texas Chainsaw Massacre franchise from the directors of Inside. The scariest surprise of all is that it may just be the better movie of the double feature but by how much? Dave Dreher brings home the Horror News of the Week with the passing of Italian filmmaker Umberto Lenzi, an Amazon zombie comedy series and the Hannibal death scene that was too gory for TV. Or was it just too expensive? Listen to Horror News Radio to find out!

As always, the HNR Grue-Crew would love to hear from you, the listeners, the fans. You can always reach out via email at feedback(AT)horrornewsradio(DOT)com or find us on Twitter: Doc Rotten | Dave Dreher | Thomas Mariani. Also, like us on Facebook and join the Horror News Radio Facebook Group.

Horror News Radio
Episode 238 – The Snowman ( 2017) – Leatherface (2017)
Subscribe – iTunes – Facebook – Stitcher

SHOW NOTES

INTRO [00:00:39]

HORROR NEWS OF THE WEEK [00:03:12]

FEATURE REVIEW: THE SNOWMAN [00:22:11]

  • The Snowman (2017)
  • director: Tomas Alfredson
  • cast: Michael Fassbender, Rebecca Ferguson, J.K. Simmons, Toby Jones, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Val Kilmer

CONTEST: GIVEAWAYS! [00:53:32]

  • The Barn Blu Ray Giveaway
    • Favorite 80s MOVIE MONSTER
    • Submit to media(AT)gruesomemagazine(DOT)com with the subject line “The Barn”
    • Open to U.S. residents only
  • The Snowman Giveaway
    • Favorite WINTER themed horror film
    • Submit to media(AT)gruesomemagazine(DOT)com with the subject line “The Snowman”
    • Open to U.S. and Canada residents only
  • Comet TV Giveaway
    • Favorite line from the ROBOCOP Trilogy
    • Submit to media(AT)gruesomemagazine(DOT)com with the subject line “Comet TV”
    • Open to U.S. residents only

WHAT HAVE YOU BEEN WATCHING: LEATHERFACE (2017) [00:59:10]

  • Leatherface (2017)
  • director: Alexandre Bustillo, Julien Maury
  • cast: Stephen Dorff, Lili Taylor, Sam Strike, Vanessa Grasse, Finn Jones

FEEDBACK [01:29:30]

  • Thanks to Tear Out the Heart and Victory Records for use of the song Undead Anthem for the intro and outro of the HNR podcast

SUPPORT HNR

Oct 26, 2017

The Snowman (2017) has all the right ingredients to make a riveting, mind-blowing thriller. It has a solid director with Tomas Alfredson (Let the Right One In) and a popular source material from author Jo Nesbo. The film, produced by none other than Martin Scorsese, features a stellar cast including Michael Fassbender, Rebeccas Furguson, Charlotte Gainsbourg, J.K. Simmons, Toby Jones, James D'Arcy, and Val Kilmer. Yet, somehow, The Snowman manages to spiral out of control becoming one of the very worst films of 2017. The Snowman is simply...abominable. Doc Rotten shares his review of the feature film that tanked at the box office this past weekend and provides a preview of what you will hear on Horror News Radio episode 238. Check out the review below.

Oct 26, 2017

"It's so strange. I'm actually rooting for this girl. She's got so much heart and you think of all the pain and the... TEQUILA IS MY LADY! MY LADY! TEQUILA! FROM DARKNESS, THERE IS LIGHT!" Steve (Bradley Whitford) avoids guilt with alcohol. Just like every responsible adult! Cabin in the Woods is easily one of the best horror films of this decade. Hard to believe it was shelved for a year or so before being released. Playing on all the tropes of horror while celebrating what draws people to them, Cabin really is the ultimate horror film. Both in the awe inspiring awesomeness sense and in the way that it feels like the final word on the genre. Make sure to sit back in your console chair and wait for the best horror climax of all time to unravel before your eyes... or ears.

Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond
Episode 28 - The Cabin in the Woods (2012)

Cabin in the Woods came out at an interesting crossroads for the careers of many involved. It was shot before star Chris Hemsworth became known as Thor, put into theaters right before co-writer Joss Whedon's The Avengers became one of the most successful films of all time and right before Drew Goddard became the Academy Award nominated screenwriter behind The Martian. All of them came together in this one moment to make the perfect modern meta horror. Cabin one upped the Scream style self aware slashers into a new galaxy all its own. Now every horror film feels like it's being controlled by the likes of Steve and Gary (Richard Jenkins) pulling strings behind the scenes. If they can keep up with all the cubes underneath their office.

To contextualize everything about Cabin, Thomas brings aboard Shakyl Lambert, Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore to explore the offices below. Discussions are had about the impeccable cast, the meta commentary on the horror genre and the massively entertaining yet nihilistic ending. The trio can barely contain their love for all the creative monsters, hilarious character moments and nudges to the rib cage Cabin goes through over its run time. Plus we ask the truly important question; what is the line between Witches and Sexy Witches? Listen to find out!

Oct 25, 2017

“Flies? Flies? Poor puny things! Who wants to eat flies?... Not when I can get nice, fat spiders!” Join the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era Grue Crew for this episode – Erin Miskell, Chad Hunt, Jeff Mohr, and special guest Dave Dreher – as we take a trip to Transylvania and ride aboard the schooner Vesta, only to end up in the Seward Sanitarium and rundown Carfax Abbey in search of Dracula (1931).

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 20 – Dracula (1931)

Director Tod Browning and cinematographer Karl Freund collaborated during the production of Dracula to create some of the most lasting icons in horror film history. Bela Lugosi (Dracula), Dwight Frye (Renfield), and Edward Van Sloan (Dr. Van Helsing) are still the portrayals to which all later incarnations are compared. Though Lugosi is the star, your Classic Era Grue Crew all agree that Dracula is Dwight Frye’s movie as he changes from a serious and dignified professional to an unpredictable, maniacal, and downright disturbing lunatic.

Unfortunately, the characters of Lucy (Frances Dade) and Mina (Helen Chandler) are barely more than props to be victimized by Dracula and saved by Van Helsing and John Harker (David Manners). On the other hand, Renfield’s attendant Martin (Charles K. Gerrard) provides the very definition of comic relief. One of our Grue Crew also proclaims their love for Lupita Tovar, who plays Eva, the Spanish language version of Mina.

You’ll also find the answers to these questions:

  • How does the Tod Browning version of Dracula compare to the Spanish language production?
  • What could the Looney Tunes bad-behaved version of Little Red Riding Hood possibly have to do with Dracula?
  • How many degrees of separation are there between the Spanish language version of Dracula and the Star Wars film, Rogue One (2016)?

If you’re paying attention, you’ll find out which of this episode’s Grue Crew made each of these statements during our podcast on Dracula:

  • “Someone just kind of handed him (Dwight Frye) this steak of a role and he just sunk all of his teeth into it and chewed it for all it was worth.”
  • “Was I the only one, when you would see Martin on the screen, that was thinking of Eric Idle from Monty Python?”
  • “The woman had many, many issues. She surpassed issue and went straight to subscriptions.”
  • “Who decided an armadillo was scary?”

We plan to release a new episode every other week. In timing with Halloween, our next episode in our very flexible schedule is Nosferatu (1922), hosted by Erin Miskell.

Please let us know what you think of Decades of Horror: The Classic Era and what films you’d like to hear us cover! We want to hear from you! After all, without you, we’re just four nutjobs talking about the films we love. Send us an email  (chadhunt@gruesomemagazine.com, erinmiskell@gruesomemagazine.com, jeffmohr@gruesomemagazine.com, or josephperry@gruesomemagazine.com) or leave us a message, a review, or a comment at GruesomeMagazine.com, iTunes, Stitcher, the Horror News Radio App, or the Horror News Radio Facebook group.

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you for listening!

Oct 24, 2017

The directors of Inside, Alexandra Bustillo and Julien Maury, take a stab at putting their footprints on the history of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre with the prequel, Leatherface (2017). The film follows a group of young patients escaping from a mental hospital and on the run. One of the madmen is a young Leatherface - ah, but which one. Lilly Taylor is the matriarch of the family while Stephen Dorff is out to destroy them. Vanessa Grasse is a nurse too green to know better mixed up in the middle of it all. And, for some reason, Finn (Iron Fist) Jones is included in the mix. Doc Rotten steps in to review the film finding it a deceptively entertaining film...as long as you forget that it is intended to be a Texas Chainsaw Massacre film. Hurray for gore and grue, the film is plenty bloody for the gore-hounds. Check out the review below.

Oct 23, 2017

"Science is neat, but I'm afraid it's not very forgiving." Mr. Clarke (Randall P. Havens) explains how harsh a mistress science can be to our young heroes. Luckily, our young boys can take on pretty much everything, including a horrific nightmare creature from a parallel dimension. All of it is up for grabs as we conclude our look at Stranger Things Season 1. Time to grab your Eggo waffles and settle in for a dark and stormy October night!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 121 – Stranger Things Season 1 Part 2 (2016)

When we last left our young heroes, Stranger Things were really starting to build. Mike (Finn Wolfhard), Dustin (Gaten Matarazzo) and Lucas (Cale McLaughlin) try to find the gate where their friend Will (Noah Schnapp) was taken into. Yet, their friendship is already being strained by the presence of Eleven (Millie Bobby Brown), both for her supernatural powers and her closeness to Mike. Meanwhile, Nancy (Natalia Dyer) and Will's brother Jonathan (Charlie Heaton) are on the hunt for the Demogorgon. Parallel to this, Joyce (Winona Ryder) and Sheriff Hopper (David Harbour) are on investigating the Hawkins National Laboratory and their shady operation. It'll all come to ahead as the reasoning behind these Stranger Things collide.

To discuss these Stranger Things, Doc Rotten, Christopher G. Moore and Thomas Mariani are traveling into The Upside Down. There's a bit of descent as to whether or not this is as strong as the first half of the season. Yet, there's unanimous agreement about many things. The kids are all still enjoyable and endearing. Our look into The Upside Down is still creepy and atmospheric. Matthew Modine goes out like a punk. There's also the question of what the upcoming new season will hold and where we could go from here. All this and more are going to stuff your earholes to the point where you may get a nosebleed. Get this cotton balls ready!

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Next Episode

The Fog (1980)... Next Week!

 

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