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Now displaying: Category: Decades of Horror 1970s
Nov 7, 2016

"Sleep . . . Sleep . . . and be born again into a world without fear and hate!" - the tagline for Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978) warns its audience of the horrors threatening to take over your body and extinguish your soul. Seventies leading man Donald Sutherland teams up with Brooke Adams, Jeff Goldblum, and Veronica Cartwright to save the world from the pod people. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 41 – Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978)

A sequel to the Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956), the 1978 version from director Philip Kaufman tackles the source material from author Jack Finney once again, filling it with all the paranoia post Nixon era Seventies where everyone is so self absorbed they'd never realize the world was being taken over by aliens. It is crazy-frightening how easy it seems for the alien pod people to take over San Francisco, starting with a cameo from Robert Duvall as a sinister priest to the chilling ending where Veronica Cartwright screams in terror. No character is safe. Still, not sure how any of this explains the crazy human faced dog,but, whatever. Points for creativity, eh.

Doc Rotten and The Black Saint return to give their thoughts on the classic sci-fi horror film recently released on Blu-ray by Scream Factory. Santos recalls watching the film in the theater in the Seventies while Doc shares how, as a kid, he originally did not like the film but grew to love it for the classic film that it is. The grue-crew look back at that careers of the main cast including Donald Sutherland, Brooke Adams, Jeff Goldblum, Veronica Cartwright, and Leonard Nemoy. The from the great sound work in the film to the special effects, they rave about Invasion of the Body Snatchers. And so should you!

Aug 25, 2016

"Carburetors man! That's what life is all about." - The opening lyrics of the song Upholstery from the rock opera Phantom of the Paradise sum it all up nicely. Music is the creative juice of life and sometimes to succeed in the music business you have to deal with shady characters. In the Brian De Palma classic, Winslow (William FInley) strikes a bargain with record label exec Swan (Paul Williams). The film mixes Faust, Phantom of the Opera and The Portrait of Dorian Gray into a lively, horror-tinged manic musical. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 40 – Phantom of the Paradise (1974)

The film we've been talking about for 39 episodes and two years finally makes it to the editing room as Doc and The Black Saint discuss Brian De Palma's Phantom of the Paradise. Joining the crew this week are Thomas Mariani, Horror News Radio co-host, and Christopher G. Moore, award winning director. Surprisingly, not everyone loves this often overlooked film. Shot between Sisters and Carrie, Brian De Palma hones his craft with music, murder and mayhem, never missing the opportunity to pay homage to a classic influence be it Alfred HItchcock or Orson Welles. The cast includes William Finley, Paul Williams, Jessica Harper and Garrit Graham with Williams supplying all the original songs.

Resting in the shadows of the cult phenomenon Rocky Horror Picture Show, De Palma's Phantom of the Paradise offers a craftier, more cinematic alternative to Time Warps and Sweet Transvestites from Transylvania. Paul Williams pulls double duty starring as the film's antagonist Swan and penning a dozen new tunes. All the entries are fantastic from "Goodbye, Eddie, Goodbye" from the Juicy Fruits to "Old Souls" performed by star Jessica Harper to Williams' own - and Black Saint fave - "The Hell of It". If the songs aren't your thing, then there's the acting, action and amazing set design. Just check out Swan's record shaped desk as he auditions new talent. Of course, the star of the film is the Phantom himself, a talented but tragic figure played by Finley. Too tame? Then check out Graham's Beef for silly satiric fun. Listen now to catch the crew's take on the musical event of 1974, Phantom of the Paradise.

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Aug 8, 2016

"Nine killed you. Nine shall die. Nine times, nine! Nine killed you! Nine shall die! Nine eternities in DOOM!" - the exposition from Vincent Price in The Abominable Dr. Phibes sets up the revenge plot of the film with usual Price flourish and delivery. Billed as Price's 100th film (it isn't, by the way), Phibes provides Price with another opportunity to create a lasting and frighteningly campy character to be cherished by horror fans for decades. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 39 – The Abominable Dr. Phibes (1971)

Vincent Price is one of those iconic actors who helps define the horror genre. His presence, talent and spirit elevate any film in which he appears from House of Wax & The Fly (1957) to the Corman Poe films to Edward Scissorhands. But with The Abominable Dr. Phibes, from director Robert Fuest, he became synonymous with a new (in 1971) horror character, Dr. Anton Phibes. Prices scarred and delusional character is hellbent on revenge on the nine doctors he holds responsible for the death of his beautiful wife, Victoria (Caroline Munro). After his own untimely accident which leaves him deformed - and thought dead by the world - Phibes hatches an elaborate plan to dispatch his targets using the 10 Plagues of Egypt as his M.O. Gruesome, gory and full of high camp, The Abominable Dr. Phibes is a highlight of Price's later career and a milestone horror film. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten, joined once again by Bill Mulligan, dive into the A.I.P. classic.

The Grue-crew explore the film, its impact and some trivia surrounding its production. The discuss how Vincent Price would tease Joseph Cotton by intentionally making funny faces so the actor, uncomfortable in his role, would break up laughing. They reminisce on what the film would be like if Peter Cushing, who was originally offered the Cotton role of Vesalius, would have been like with the two actors facing off.  The crew marvel at the Art-deco design and the production work throughout. If you gather that the crew love The Abominable Dr. Phibes from this description, you're not far off. The podcast is an affectionate look back at one of Seventies most iconic early films.

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Jul 21, 2016

"For centuries they were hunted for bounty, fun and food... now it's their turn" - the tagline for Day of the Animals only hints at the madness hidden just below the surface of William Girdler's often overlooked Nature Runs Amok classic. The film features Christopher George, Lynda Day George and Richard Jaeckel in lead roles with Leslie Nielsen stealing the film with his terrific supporting performance. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 38 – Day of the Animals (1977)

On a lark, Doc stumbled across Day of the Animals on the Shudder horror movie streaming site. After watching the film from director William Girdler, a quick text to The Black Saint placed the film at the topic of this week's Decades of Horror. The evidence was clear, it was time to discuss this late entry into the Nature Runs Amok craze of the Seventies with its large cast of characters, bizarre kills, a PSA approach to the depletion of the ozone layer and Leslie Nielsen. The Black Saint instantly agreed and episode 38 was in the can just like that.

As a huge fan of William Girdler, proclaiming The Manitou as his favorite horror film, The Black Saint has a lot to say about Day of the Animals. The film is nested between Grizzly and The Manitou in Girdler's filmography. Often mistaken as a sequel to Grizzly, the film stands on its own with great performances, a direct fast-paced plot and heavy use of real animals as the antagonists. That is until Leslie Nielson's character looses his flipping mind. Catch Andrew (The Fury) Stephens and Susan (Jaws) Blacklinie in supporting roles and be amazed at the awesome screen presence of Michael Ansara. Ha! Day of the Animals is a real treat as Doc Rotten and The Black Saint dive into what makes the film so special. This is episode 38!

Jul 7, 2016

"There's only ONE thing wrong with the Davis baby... IT'S ALIVE" - the tagline for It's Alive is one of the better examples of what a great tagline can do for a film. The film originally released in 1974 to mediocre returns, came back strong with a more focused marketing campaign in 1977 to become a huge hit. The tagline along with a powerful but simple trailer of a baby carriage with the creatures claw sticking out of it drove viewers into the theaters to the tune of $39 million. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 37 – It's Alive (1974)

The Black Saint shares his reaction to that trailer and how It's Alive affected him upon seeing it in the theaters. He and Doc share their thoughts on the cast (John P. Ryan and Sharon Farrell), the gore (what little there actually is) and the special effects. Yes, the baby creature is designed by the one and only Rick Baker in an early puppet effort. The design is fantastic and the film follows the tried-and-true adage of showing very little of the monster throughout the film. One of the more powerful scenes is the aftermath of the birthing of the Davis baby with carnage and bloodshed splattered about the dead bodies. Great stuff of nightmares.

Of course much of the film's success and tone is due to the unique talent that is writer/director Larry Cohen. It's Alive is his crowning achievement spawning two sequels also written and directed by Cohen. It Lives Again would quickly follow in 1978 and It's Alive III: Island of the Alive would come a decade later in 1987. The film benefits from a terrific performance from John P. Ryan and a quick pace. Doc Rotten and the Black Saint return to the days where a bloodied puppet can give goose pimples more goose pimples as they recap and review It's Alive.

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

May 30, 2016

"Abracadabra, I sit on his knee. Presto chango, and now he is me. Hocus Pocus, we take her to bed. Magic is fun; we're dead." - the tagline for Magic seeds the undercurrent of fear that permeates this classic and classy horror film from 1978. The film features a young, pre-Hannibal, Anthony Hopkins in two roles, one being Corky the magician who uses a vantriquilist dummy to give his act a much needed angle and the voice of the dummy named Fats. Burgess Meredith and Ann-Margret co-star in a tale of madness, murder and mayhem. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 36 – Magic (1978)

The Black Saint returns to discuss a film dear to his heart - or, at least, dear to his phobia about "dummies" and dolls. If you have listened to episodes of Horror News Radio, you will have heard this topic mentioned quite often. In addition to key episodes of Twilight Zone and a few similar horror films in the 70s, it is Richard Attenborough's Magic (1978) that cemented this fear in the Black Saint. This fear is not ill-found, the trailer for the film alone is one of the more frightening trailers of the decade along with Jaws, Exorcist and Suspiria.

The host of Decades of Horror 1970s bravely joins his co-host Doc Rotten to cover Magic as they dive into the incredible performance by Anthony Hopkins, the lovely addition of Ann-Margret as Hopkin's love interest and the 1970s horror film staple Burgess Meredith in one of his best feature roles this side of Mickey (Rocky 1976), Then, of course, ample time is dedicated to discussing Fats, the disturbing ventriloquist dummy voiced by Hopkins. Richard Attenborough shows off his attention to detail and mood in his directing of the film with one specific scene the perfectly illustrates Corky's descent into madness as Ben Greene (Meredith) confronts him about Fats. The best 5 minutes ever. Chilling!

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

May 10, 2016

"I killed her. I knew I would, the first time I said 'Hello'." - the tagline for The Fury masks the madness that is master director Brian DePalma's often overlooked film released following his massive hit Carrie. All the DePalma signature moves are on display and the blood runs gruesome red, just ask John Cassevettes. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 35 – The Fury (1978)

Doc is joined by award winning director Christopher G. Moore to discuss what many fans call Carrie 2.0, it is Brian DePalma's The Fury featuring Kirk Douglas, John Cassavettes, Carrie Snodgress, Charles Durning, Amy Irving, Fiona Lewis and Andrew Stephens. The film is typical DePalma with a variety of storylines merging into a single gory, explosive climax. The film features effects by Rick Baker, Rob Bottin and Greg Cannom and a score from the one and only John Williams.  Join The Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore as they discuss this classic horror film.

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

May 2, 2016

"He Knows When You're Sleeping, He Knows if You're Awake, He KNOWS..." - the tagline for Black Christmas promises a holiday horror treat for fans of 1970s fans. The film is from director Bob Clark (Children Shouldn't Play With Dead Things) long before he would gain mainstream fame for A Christmas Story and Porky's. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 34 – Black Christmas (1974)

Santos and Doc are joined by award winning director Christopher G. Moore to discuss the first seasonal slasher flick Black Christmas featuring Olivia Hussey, Keir Dullea, Margot Kidder, John Saxon, Andrea Martin, James Edmond, Doug McGrath, Art Hindle, Lynne Griffin and Michael Rapport. Eventually seen on NBC during prime time under the title Stranger in the House, Black Christmas became a favorite film for Elvis Presley and would influence a generation of horror films from Halloween to When a Stranger Calls. Join The Black Saint, Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore as they discuss this classic horror film.

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Apr 11, 2016

"You haven't seen Kung fu until you've seen the 7 BROTHERS and 1 SISTER take DRACULA" - the US tagline for Legend of the 7 Golden Vampires promises a mishmash of horror, kung-fu and blacksploitation with the alternate title The 7 Brothers meet Dracula. However, this cult-class Hammer film is now known and loved under its original title and without the cuts and edits the US version suffered. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 33 – Legend of the 7 Golden Vampires (1974)

Horror aficionado Bill Mulligan joins Decades of Horror to tackle another Hammer film from the Seventies, Legend of the 7 Golden Vampires. This film, one of Hammer's last, may be the studio's most bizarre film as they team up with China's Shaw Brothers to blend their Gothic horror with kung-fu action. Peter Cushing is back as Professor Van Helsing but Christopher Lee is no where to be seen as Dracula. Instead, we are treated to John Forbes-Robertson taking up the role in the only Hammer Dracula appearance that does not have Lee as the Lord of the Undead. David Chiang as Hsi Ching and his Kung-fu siblings join Van Helsing and his son to take on the 7 Golden Vampire providing the film with fangs, blood, boobies and big action battles galore. Good times!

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Mar 27, 2016

"He gave his critics a bloody and violent taste of their own medicine!" - the tagline for Theatre of Blood promises murder and mayhem the only way horror icon Vincent Price knows how  with wit and horror. The legendary actor stars as Edward Kendal Sheridan Lionheart, a Shakespearean actor shamed to the point of suicide by a London circle of critics. Little did they know, he would return to exact his revenge. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 32 – Theatre of Blood (1973)

Much like the Dr. Phibes movies from the previous two years, Theatre of Blood from 1972 is a violent and bloody revenge caper with a dark sense of humor also starring Vincent Price. Lionhart is set on getting his revenge and he has his targets set on the nine critics that defamed him. Price has a blast in the Douglas Hickox directed feature where he dons a variety of costumes and characters while waxing poetic with famous Shakespearean dialog. While he's at it, Price also hatches elaborate ways to dispatch his victims based on the deaths in those famous plays. Lots to discuss as Doc and The Black Saint dive one of the Black Saint's favorite Price performances.

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Mar 16, 2016

"18 Feet of Gut-Crunching, Man-Eating Terror!" - the tagline for Grizzly, along with that killer Neal Adams poster, promises the ultimate Jaws ripoff of all time. The film is helmed by a favorite 70s director William Girdler and features Christopher George, Andrew Prine, Richard Jaekel and an 18 foot grizzly bear (well, close...). The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 31 – Grizzly (1976)

For episode 31 of Decades of Horror, Doc Rotten and the Black Saint dive into the campy, gruesome fun of Grizzly and all its gory, silly goodness. The film holds the record of being the most successful independent motion picture of 1976, a distinction it held until Halloween surfaced two years later. Along with other goofy factoids and fond memories, we learn the film holds a special place in the Black Saint's heart as he shares watching the film with mother when the film debuted on TV a year or so later. Doc, of course, fixates on the many similarities between Grizzly and Jaws from the three main characters, the creature on the prowl story-line and the inclusion of actress Susan Backlinie. But, in the end, it really is all about that poster art. C'mon, seriously.

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Feb 13, 2016

"Who are these unholy savages who hunt out their victims by sound alone?" - the tagline for Tombs of the Blind Dead (La Noche del Terror Ciego) from under-appreciated Spanish director Amando de Ossorio introduces the zombie-like terror of The Templar Knights. When a group of travelers stumble upon an abandoned, dilapidated castle, los Guerreros de Oriente rise from the grave to drink their blood. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode3 – Tombs of the Blind Dead (1971)

Excited to discuss the film he refers to as "Revenge from Planet Ape", Bill Mulligan returns to guest-host this episode of Decades of Horror. Joining us for the first time is fan-turned-guest-host Jerry Chandler, writer for Needless Things. Bill and Jerry quickly reveals they are huge fans of Tombs of the Blind Dead as they join Doc and the Black Saint in recapping and reviewing La Noche del Terror Ciego. Fun things that come up, in addition to the Planet of the Apes marketing ploy, is a debate if the creatures in the film are zombies, vampires or raging ghosts. A familiar but often forgotten gem, Tombs of the Blind Dead proves to be a terrific topic to discuss thanks to the Grue-believers from Gruesome Magazine who helped select the topic for this episode.

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

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Jan 31, 2016

"If this one doesn't scare you, you're already dead" - the tagline for the Don Coscarelli cult classic Phantasm (1979) foreshadows an experience not to be forgotten. And, it delivers. There is nothing like Phantasm with its nightmare narrative, the Tall Man and those deadly flying spheres. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 29 – Phantasm (1979)

Thomas Mariani, co-managing editor of OneofUs.net and co-host of Horror News Radio, joins The Black Saint and Doc Rotten to discuss a bonafide classic of horror movies, Seventies or otherwise,  Phantasm. In recent months the film is set to get a 4K makeover with a release shepherded by J.J. Abrams and another sequel called Phantasm Ravager. And with the passing of the film's Tall Man, Angus Scrimm (Lawrence Rory Guy), Decade of Horror is revisiting Phantasm with bitter sweet joy and a heavy heart. After all these years, the film holds up tremendously well, even if some of its tricks are beginning to show their low-budget origins. Check out that marble wall paper and glimpses of the rope used to help Angus pick up the coffin. Still the Tall Man will haunt your dreams and the flying spheres will make you piss your pants.

Jan 16, 2016

"Welcome to the Bottom of the Food Chain!" - the tagline for the cult classic, so-bad-it-is-good, AIP horror film from Bert I. Gordon, Food of the Gods (1976) reveals  not only the theme of the film, but the level of quality as well. Boom goes the mic. Called "Worst Rodent Movie Of All Time" by Michael Medved, the film is a bit more fondly remembered now for how cheesy it is, for all its camp. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 28 – Food of the Gods (1976)

Back in 1976, Mr. B.I.G. - that's the master of shlock Bert I. Gordon (The Amazing Colossal Man, Empire of the Ants) to horror fans - adapted a "portion" of H.G. Wells The Food of the Gods and How It Came to Earth for AIP as Food of the Gods featuring Marjoe Gortner (Earthquake) in the lead and Pamela Franklin (The Legend of Hell House) in her last theatrical film. Ida Lupino, Ralph Meeker, Jon Cypher, Belinda Balaski and Tom Stovall round out the cast. The known for its giant rats also includes giant wasps, maggots, chickens and one pissed off rooster. While it is AIP's most financially successful film of the year, it is remembered for all the campy effects and rather lousy adaptation. Still it has its fans. Doc Rotten and the Black Saint spend an hour looking back at this nature-runs-amok Seventies classic. Remember, "One Taste Is All It Takes!"

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Dec 31, 2015

"Is it a phantom, a demon, or the Devil himself?" - the tagline for the cult classic, so-bad-it-is-good, Jaws-on-land Seventies horror film The Car (1977) promises something satanic behind the wheel of the custom 971 Lincoln Continental Mark III black coupe. There's nowhere to run, nowhere to hide, no way to stop... The Car. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

 

Decades of Horror 1970s 
Episode 27 – The Car (1977) 

 

Decades of Horror started 2015 with The Black Saint's favorite flick, The Manitou, we end the end taking a look at Doc's most cherish thriller Universal's and Elliot Silverstein's The Car, featuring James Brolin, Kathleen Lloyd, John Marley, R.G. Armstrong, John Rubinstein and Ronnie Cox. The film is designed as a semi-rip-off of Jaws with a killer car stalking its victims in the desert outside of Santa Ynez. This film is remembered for its George Barris' car design - the man behind the Batmobile and theMunster's Drag-u-la. Santos agrees with director Silverstein that the film just isn't scary, but Doc is adamant that the film remains a terrific, fun flick from his childhood - and the Black Saint concedes that he did have a fun time watching The Car.

 

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Nov 30, 2015

"Your children will die...to give me back...my...life..." - the prophetic tagline gasped by Count Mitterhouse during the 13 minute pre-credits opening for the most bizarre vampire film, the most unusual Hammer Film, sets up the curse that drives Vampire Circus (1971). The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

 

Decades of Horror 1970s 
Episode 26 – Vampire Circus (1971) 

 

Horror aficionado and film maker Bill Mulligan returns to co-host Decades of Horror along with The Black Saint and Doc as they dig into the vault of Hammer horror for the first time with Vampire Circus. The film is full of vampires and henchmen as the Circus of Nights invades the small Austrian village of Stetl where the curse of Count Mitterhouse has cast is black shadow onto the townsfolk - in the form of the black plague. The vampires lead by gypsy woman, a dwarf clown and Emil, Count Mitterhouse's cousin. The film is full of early 70's nudity and an unusual amount of blood and gore - even for a Hammer film - which is indicative of the changing times in cinema and horror films of the decade. In addition, there is an unexpected tie to the biggest film of the Seventies, the sci-fi classic Star Wars with Darth Vader himself, David Prowse, cast as the Strongman.

 

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Oct 20, 2015

"There's no place else to go and pretty soon we'll all be dead, so forget it! Enjoy yourself! Let's sing and dance while we can! Come on, blow your mind!" - the out-of-this-world 70's tagline for the cult favorite Godzilla vs Hedorah still does not approach how unbelievably bizarre this entry into the Godzilla lexicon actually is. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

 

Decades of Horror 1970s 
Episode 24 – Dracula vs Frankenstein (1971) 

 

Horror aficionado and film maker Bill Mulligan return to co-host Decades of Horror to take a long, loving look at the wacky Godzilla vs the Smog Monster film from 1971. Thomas Mariani is on board to share his take of the film as well. Topics discussed tonight include but are not limited to "How does Godzilla manage to fly?", "What is a Hedorah anyway?", "Is that animation from Sesame Street?", "Are those eggs, eyes or testicles?" and "Can you sing the song 'Save the Earth' in its entirety?" Not many films earn the "got to be seen to be believed" like Godzilla vs Hedorah does. Join The Black Saint, Doc Rotten, Bill and Thomas in the grooviest Godzilla story committed to film.

 

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Sep 21, 2015

"Yesterday they were cold and dead. Today they're hot and bothered!" - the tagline for the Al Adamson 1971 cult classic Dracula vs Frankenstein immediately sets up the unique tone and goofy splendor that this one-of-kind film possesses. There is literally no other film like it - and there should never be one.  The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

 

Decades of Horror 1970s 
Episode 24 – Dracula vs Frankenstein (1971) 

 

Dracula vs Frankenstein (1971) is a quirky combination of three separate films, starting off as a sequel to Al Adamson's hit biker film Satan's Sadists then morphing into The Blood Seekers before adding the titular monsters for Dracula vs Frankenstein. The result is spectacular in its awfulness, a must-see film. The film stars horror favorite J. Carrol Naish and icon Lon Chaney Jr. in their final horror film roles as Dr. Frankenstein and the Mad Zombie. Dracula and Frankenstein are played by Zandor Vorkov and John Bloom - the monster is also credited to Shelly Weiss who donned the make-up for the final scene. Bill Mulligan returns to guess-host along side Doc and the Black Saint as they take a fascinating look back as Dracula vs Frankenstein.

 

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Aug 29, 2015

"She's sweet as sugar... with a voodoo army of the undead!" - the tag line for Sugar Hill (1974) sets up the premise pretty quickly as Marki Bey teams up with Baron Samedi to go up against the under-appreciated Robert Quarry with her Zombie Hit Men. Black-spoitation never had it so good as is does with Sugar Hill.  The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

 

Decades of Horror 1970s 
Episode 23 – Sugar Hill (1974) 

 

Sugar Hill (1974) is one of the few films that holds its cult following so closely to its chest. It was only recently that the film finally received proper DVD and Blu-Ray release,  many of the Decades of Horror listeners probably have not even heard of this groovy little monster film. In the time between the voodoo zombies of I Walk with a Zombie and White Zombie and the ghoul zombies from Romero's Dawn of the Dead and Fulci's Zombi, as Night of the Living Dead continued to define what a zombie is, this little gem takes one last stab as a great voodoo zombie tale. And it succeeds marvelously. Check out The Black Saint and Doc Rotten's review of Sugar Hill.

 

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Aug 20, 2015

"A tidal wave of slithering, slimy horror devouring, destroying all in its path!" - the tag line for FROGS (1972) promises the first eco-horror experience while the poster displays a giant frog with a human hand hanging from its mouth. While there are no giants in Frogs, there are plenty of killer critters involved from snakes, spiders, alligators and snapping turtles. And, of course, plenty of Frogs! The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

 

Decades of Horror 1970s 
Episode 22 – Frogs (1972) 

 

Frogs is one of the first eco-horror films from the Seventies - could be the first depending on how Willard (1971) is categorized. The film also features a young, buff Sam Elliot - without his signature mustache! Ray Milland, Joan Van Ark and Adam Roarke head up the rest of the cast. The George McCowan directed film provides plenty of thrills and excitement - sort of - as an evil gang of frogs and toads leads an island full of creepy critters on a murderous rampage: snakes, spiders, lizards, alligators and snapping turtles take out the cast one-by-one. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten share their thoughts on the film, how it holds up and debate if it is truly an overlooked classic or a glorious groovy crap-fest.

 

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Aug 1, 2015

"And now with the fights, the Fuzz, the chicks and the choppers...Man, they're really in deeeeep trouble!" - the poster for THE THING WITH TWO HEADS (1972) embellishes its plot with Seventies florish. The second of two films featuring creatures with two heads, this Lee Frost / AIP cult classic features Ray Milland and Rosie Grier as the two-headed monster. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

 

Decades of Horror 1970s 
Episode 21 – The Thing with Two Heads (1972) 

 

The Thing with Two Heads begins by featuring marvelous gorilla costume (yes, with two heads) created by and worn by a young Rick Baker. Great stuff. The film gets increasingly nutty as Ray Milland's characters nears death forcing his assistant Roger Perry to graft his head onto the body of Rosie Grier. Rosie plays a convict on death row who wants the 30 more days afforded him by offering his body to science to prove his innocence. This leads to an elaborate and long car chase throughout the second act as the escaped Rosie with Ray's head evades police capture. Hilarious. A film from the Seventies well deserving its status as a cult classic. 

 

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.


Jul 12, 2015

"I'm not afraid of the dark, I'm afraid of what's in it." - trailer for THE DARK (1979). This is one of those head-scratching genre films that littered the Seventies. Originally a straight up monster movie, the film was re-written as a sci-fi flick at the last minute replacing director Tobe Hooper with John "Bud" Cardos. How does that happen? The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

 

Decades of Horror 1970s 
Episode 20 – The Dark (1979) 

 

The Dark has an extraordinary cast with everyone wondering just WTF is going on. The film features William Devane, Cathy Lee Crosby, Richard Jaeckel & Keenan Wynn in the headlining roles with Biff Eliot, Casey Kasem, John Bloom (as The Dark), Jacqueline Hydem, Vivian Blaine & Philip Michael Thomas (Miami Vice) as Corn Rows in supporting roles. The script has cop Jaeckel and writer Devane, the father of the first victim, bickering back and forth as they chase down the creature they call The Dark, a monstrous beast that shoots death rays from his eyes. Yup.

 

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Jun 16, 2015

"It is as if God created the Devil and gave him… Jaws." - trailer for JAWS (1975). Steven Spielberg's classic Universal horror film is considered one of Hollywood's finest achievements in terror. The cast is phenomenal, a trio of actors that will never be equaled: Roy Scheider, Robert Shaw and Richard Dreyfuss. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

 

Decades of Horror 1970s 
Episode 19 – Jaws (1975) 
Part 2 w/ Bill Mulligan, Christopher G. Moore & Alan G. Kelly. 

 

Doc Rotten is joined by three film makers to discuss the making, the challenges and the achievements of the timeless classic, JAWS. Join Doc and his friends Bill Mulligan, Christopher G. Moore and Alan G. Kelly as they relive the film recounting some of the best scenes in the film - some of the best scenes in cinema history. They discuss how the tension is built with camera angles, cinematography, composition and music. The scary scenes are dissected, Quint's demise and Ben Gardner's jump scare. Alan and Chris reveal how the "Vertigo" dolly shot was done to accent Sheriff Brody's witnessing the death of the Kintner boy. And of course, no discussion of JAWS can go without mentioning the Indianapolis speech.

 

Japanese submarine slammed two torpedoes into her side, Chief. We was comin’ back from the island of Tinian to Leyte. We’d just delivered the bomb. The Hiroshima bomb. Eleven hundred men went into the water. Vessel went down in 12 minutes.

 

Didn’t see the first shark for about a half-hour. Tiger. 13-footer. You know how you know that in the water, Chief? You can tell by lookin’ from the dorsal to the tail. What we didn’t know, was that our bomb mission was so secret, no distress signal had been sent. They didn’t even list us overdue for a week. Very first light, Chief, sharks come cruisin’ by, so we formed ourselves into tight groups. It was sorta like you see in the calendars, you know the infantry squares in the old calendars like the Battle of Waterloo and the idea was the shark come to the nearest man, that man he starts poundin’ and hollerin’ and sometimes that shark he go away… but sometimes he wouldn’t go away.

 

Sometimes that shark looks right at ya. Right into your eyes. And the thing about a shark is he’s got lifeless eyes. Black eyes. Like a doll’s eyes. When he comes at ya, he doesn’t even seem to be livin’… ’til he bites ya, and those black eyes roll over white and then… ah then you hear that terrible high-pitched screamin’. The ocean turns red, and despite all your poundin’ and your hollerin’ those sharks come in and… they rip you to pieces.

 

You know by the end of that first dawn, lost a hundred men. I don’t know how many sharks there were, maybe a thousand. I do know how many men, they averaged six an hour. Thursday mornin’, Chief, I bumped into a friend of mine, Herbie Robinson from Cleveland. Baseball player. Boson’s mate. I thought he was asleep. I reached over to wake him up. He bobbed up, down in the water, he was like a kinda top. Upended. Well, he’d been bitten in half below the waist.

 

At noon on the fifth day, a Lockheed Ventura swung in low and he spotted us, a young pilot, lot younger than Mr. Hooper here, anyway he spotted us and a few hours later a big ol’ fat PBY come down and started to pick us up. You know that was the time I was most frightened. Waitin’ for my turn. I’ll never put on a lifejacket again. So, eleven hundred men went into the water. 316 men come out, the sharks took the rest, June the 29th, 1945.

 

Anyway, we delivered the bomb.

 

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Jun 3, 2015

"Anti-shark cage. You go inside the cage? Cage goes in the water, you go in the water. Shark's in the water. Our shark." - Quint to Hooper in JAWS (1975). Steven Spielberg's classic Universal horror film is considered one of Hollywood's finest achievements in terror. The cast is phenomenal, a trio of actors that will never be equaled: Roy Scheider, Robert Shaw and Richard Dreyfuss. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

 

Decades of Horror 1970s 
Episode 18 – Jaws (1975) 
Part 1 w/ The Black Saint, Doc Rotten, Dave Dreher and Thomas Mariani 
with Special Guest-Host Bill Oberst, Jr. 

 

Joining The Black Saint and Doc Rotten are joined by their Horror News Radio colleagues, Thomas Mariani and Dave Dreher, to dive into the waters off of Amity Island as Sheriff Martin Brody, Bartholomew M. Quint and Matt Hooper battle a 25 tons of man-eating machine, a great white shark named "Bruce." Just to make sure the shark does not swim up and bite us in the ass, we have a very special guest-host joining us to discuss seeing JAWS for the first time back in 1975, the extraordinary and prolific actor Bill Oberst, Jr.

 

There is a creature alive today that has survived millions of years of evolution without change, without passion and without logic. It lives to kill; a mindless eating machine. It will attack and devour anything. It is as if God created the Devil and gave him… Jaws.

 

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

 

Be sure to catch Bill Oberst, Jr. on stage performing a one-man show of Ray Bradbury’s 1948 novella Pillar Of Fire described as "50 minutes of pure prose magic from the Master Of Imagination" by Hollywood Fringe.

 
http://www.hollywoodfringe.org/projects/2496

May 24, 2015

Airport from 1970 was not the first "disaster film" but it was a monster box office hit that ignited a series of disaster films throughout the Seventies until the spoof Airplane (1980) would put it all to rest 10 years later. With the release of San Andreas (2015), Decades of Horror '70 takes a look at four of the major shakers and movers in this star studded sub-genre: Airport (1970), The Poseidon Adventure (1972), Earthquake (1974) and The Towering Inferno (1974). The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

 

Decades of Horror 1970s 
Episode 17 – Disaster Films 
Airport – The Poseidon Adventure – Earthquake – The Towering Inferno 

 

The Black Saint and Doc Rotten celebrate the decade of disaster by looking at the big four. Starting with Airport, the take a quick look as the box office, the filming and the cast all the way to The Towering Inferno. The films remain influential and are remarkable in how they hold up after all these years. What makes them so incredible? Is it the nature of the sub-genre? Is it the incredible cast that include a string of Hollywood greats from their time? Check out the famous faces these films include, Burt Lancaster, Dean Martin, Helen Hayes, Gene Hackman, Shelley Winters, Red Buttons, Ernest Borgnine, Charleton Heston, George Kennedy, Faye Dunaway, Paul Newman and Steve McQueen. Big special effects, sprawling soap opera conflicts and sensurround. Hold tight, The Black Saint and Doc Rotten are here to rescue you. "Linda! My Linda!" - Ernest Borgnine, The Poseidon Adventure.

 

AIRPORT (1970)

 

Based on the novel by Arthur Hailey and directed by George Seaton, Airport stars Burt Lancaster, Dean Martin, Jean Seberg, Jacqueline Bisset, George Kennedy, Helen Hayes, Van Heflin, Maureen Stapleton, Lloyd Nolan, Barbara Hale, Gary Collins. The film earns Helen Hayes an Academy Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role. Released on March 5, 1970 with a budget of $10 million, it grosses over $100 million.

 

THE POSEIDON ADVENTURE (1972)

 

Irwin Allen steps into the disaster film ring with The Poseidon Adventure in 1972 with perhaps the best of all disaster films. The film is based on the novel Paul Gallico and is directed by Ronald Neame. The cast is phenomenal staring Gene Hackman, Ernest Borgnine, Red Buttons, Carol Lynley, Roddy McDowall, Stella Stevens, Shelley Winters, Jack Albertson, Pamela Sue Martin, Arthur O'Connell, Eric Shea and Leslie Nielsen. The film would earn the Best Original Song Academy Award for  "The Morning After" and the Special Achievement Award for Visual Effects. Released on December 13, 1972 with a budget of $5 million, it grosses over $90 million.

 

EARTHQUAKE (1974)

 

Mark Robson directs the original screenplay from George Fox and Mario Puzo presenting what would be advertised as "An Event..." film. Known for being presented in sensurround, Earthquake stars harlton Heston, Ava Gardner, George Kennedy, Lorne Green, Genevieve Bujold, Richard Roundtree, Marjoe Gortner, Barry Sullivan, Lloyd Nolan, Victoria Principal and Walter Matthau (as Walter Matuschanskayasky). It wins the Academy Award for Best Sound and the Special Achievement Award for Visual Effects. Released on November 15, 1974 with a budget of $7 million, it grosses over $75 million.

 

THE TOWERING INFERNO (1974)

 

Irwin Allen is back again using two books as inspiration - the novel The Tower by Richard Martin Stern and the novel The Glass Inferno by Thomas N. Scortia & Frank M. Robinson - for the block buster of all disaster films, the Towering Inferno. The film stars Steve McQueen, Paul Newman, William Holden, Faye Dunaway, Fred Astair, Susan Blakely, Richard Chamberlain, Jennifer Jones, O.J. Simson, Robert Vaughn, Robert Wagner and Mike Lookingland. The films wins Best Cinematography, Best Editing and Best Music, Original Song: "We May Never Love Like This Again." Released on December 16, 1974 with a budget of $14 million, it grosses over $116 million.

 

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

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