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Now displaying: Category: Decades of Horror 1970s
May 3, 2015

William Marshall returns as Prince Mamuwalde in SCREAM, BLACULA, SCREAM (1973). Decades of Horror return to early Blacksploitation horror with the AIP sequel to their hit vampire flick Blacula (1972). Along for the ride are Richard Lawson and Pam Grier. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

 

Decades of Horror 1970s 
Episode 15 – Scream Blacula Scream (1973) 

 

The director of Count Yorga, Vampire and The Return of Count Yorga, Bob Kelljan , resurrects Dracula' Soul Brother for Scream, Blacula, Scream. "The Black Prince of Shadows Stalks the Earth Again!" promises the tag line while The Black Saint argues the title suggests a far different film. Doc defends the movie enjoying the inclusion of voodoo and more vampirism while the Black Saint insists it is as slow as molasses. Regardless William Marshall owns the roles and keeps the film alive with another wonderful performance.

 

Some fun dialog: 
Pimp, "Your bread, man, all of it! Or are we gonna have to become anti-social and kick your ass?" 
Blacula, "I'm sorry, I don't have any 'bread' on me, and as for 'kicking my ass' I'd strongly suggest you give it careful consideration before trying"

 

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Apr 26, 2015

Nazi Zombies, Alan Ormsby makeup design, Peter Cushing and John Caradine: it is a recipe for greatness. This episode Decades of Horror dives into the bloody waters of SHOCK WAVES from director Ken Wiederhorn. The tagline says it all, "Once They Were Almost Human! Beneath the living... Beyond the dead... From the depths of Hell's Ocean! The Deep End of Horror!" The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

 

Decades of Horror 1970s 
Episode 16 – Shock Waves (1977) 

 

North Carolina film maker Bill Mulligan returns DoH to discuss Shock Waves along with horror fan Paul Cardullo who along with Doc Rotten recently caught the film on the big screen at the Retrofantasma film series at the Carolina Theater in Durham, NC. Along with the aforementioned Cushing and Carradine, Shock Waves stars Brook Adams and Don Stout. The film is fondly remembered for its atmospheric imagery of water logged Nazi Zombies rising from the depths. The Black Saint, Doc, Bill and Paul spend an hour looking back at the polarizing but influential cult classic, Shock Waves.

 

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Apr 4, 2015

The first and best of all "blaxploitation" horror films, BLACULA, takes a bite out of The Black Saint and Doc Rotten on episode 14 of Decades of Horror. "Are you ILL, sir?!" belts William Marshall as Prince Mamawalde as Count Dracula crosses "Dracula's Soul Brother" in the opening of William Crain's Seventies classic. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

 

Decades of Horror 1970s 
Episode 14 – Blacula (1972) 

 

As Blacula and its sequel, Scream Blacula Scream are released on Blu-Ray by Scream Factory (March 2015), The Black Saint and Doc Rotten dive into the film discussing William Marshall, Blaxploitation horror and the Hues Corporation. More than many of the films of the decade, Blacula is steeped in the vibe of the times from the dialog to the costumes. The film owes a lot to the imposing and dynamic presence of William Marshall as Mamuwalde and Blacula. The make up effect are decent for the time and the slow motion vampire attack still leaves a lasting impression on The Black Saint.

 

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Mar 8, 2015

Novelist, screen writer, director Michael Crichton brings the iconic Westworld to cinema screens in 1973 set in an Disneyland-inspired amusement park where robots interact with guests enabling them to live out fantasy environments long gone, Medieval World, Roman World and West World. A computer virus sends the robots on an uncontrolled path of death, destruction and mayhem. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

 

Decades of Horror 1970s 
Episode 13 – Westworld (1973) 

 

For Westworld, and in preparation for the forthcoming HBO series coming spring/summer 2015, The Black Saint and Doc Rotten revisit the classic science goes wrong cautionary tale that has since inspired HalloweenTerminator and Crichton's own Jurassic Park. While Richard Benjamin and James Brolin are the leads in the film, Yul Brynner steals the entire film as the rogue robot "The Gunslinger" - which is a homage to his classic "Chris" character in The Magnificent Seven.

 

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Feb 20, 2015

From the director of PORKY'SMURDER BY DECREE and A CHRISTMAS STORY comes a tale so terrifying, to frightening, you will "piss your pants." CHILDREN SHOULDN'T PLAY WITH DEAD THINGS is Bob Clark's under-appreciated zombie cult classic from 1973. Not widely seen, but loved by most all who have seen it, the film bridges the gap between NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD and EVIL DEAD.  The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

  

Decades of Horror 1970s 
Episode 12 – Children Shouldn't Play with Dead Things (1973) 

 

For Children Shouldn't Play with Dead Things, Doc Rotten and The Black Saint are joined by Ormon Grimsby and Joseph Fittos to discuss Bob Clark's oddball zombie flick from 1973. Ormon, the animated horror host from North Carolina, claims the film as one of his favorites, influential to both his love of horror films and his horror hosting personality. The Black Saint is not far behind him in his high praise and appreciation for this low budget must-see-film.

 

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Feb 1, 2015

"Who calls me from out of the Pit?" The tag line exclaims one Ernest Borgnine's best lines as Jonathan Corbis in The Devil's Rain (1975) where he transforms into a goat faced pagan demon. Director Robert Fuest's campy horror flick not only has William Shatner, Tom Skerritt, Keenan Wynn, Ida Lupino and Eddie Albert in its all star cast, the film also presents the first screen appearance of John Travolta.  The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

 

Decades of Horror 1970s 
Episode 11 – The Devil's Rain (1975) 

 

For The Devil's Rain, Doc Rotten and The Black Saint step back into 1975 to recap, review and remember a campy devil classic where the entire cast melts during the finale. The ending contains spectacular special effects, the movie contains the iconic Corbis make up on Ernest Borgnine and stands in a long line of 70's films with a terrific, powerful downer ending. The Black Saint spotlights the fun encounter between Shatner and Borgnine near the middle of the film while Doc points out how the film is basically broken into two films, Shatner's story followed by Skerritt's tale.

 

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Jan 12, 2015

"Evil Does Not Die...It Waits...to be Re-Born." The tag line for The Manitou (1978) promises the birth of a modern horror classic monster. The re-release of William Girdler's film reveals a number of its more prominent influences, "Possession marked The Exorcist. Demonaic Pregenacy arupted Rosemary's Baby. Warnings followed The Omen. And The Manitou has it all combined!" The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s. 

 

Decades of Horror 1970s 
Episode 10 – The Manitou (1978) 

 

For The Manitou, Doc Rotten and The Black Saint are joined by North Carolina writer/director/fxartist Bill (400 Ways to Kill a Vampire, A Few Brains More) Mulligan to discuss THE FILM at the top of The Black Saint's all-time favorite films. The man adores this movie. Tony Curtis, Michael Ansara, Susan Stragberg, Stella Stevens, Jon Cedar and Burgess Meredith top line the film that pits Curtis' Harry Erskine and Michael Ansara's John Singing Rock against the 200 year old Medicine Man, Misquemacus.

 

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Dec 23, 2014

"Below the crypt lies death's waiting room...the Vault of Horror." Milton Subotsky and Amicus return with another horror anthology The Vault of Horror, a direct follow up to Tales from the Crypt (1972). Roy Ward Baker steps in to take the director reigns from Freddie Francis bringing his own distinct but similar style with improved angles and composition with a more humorous tint. The blu ray also brings the film to the States for the first time uncut.  The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

 

Decades of Horror 1970s 
Episode 9 – Vault of Horror (1973) 

 

The Vault of Horror brings five new tales to the big screen inspired by and adapted from the EC horror comics from the 50's, four from Tales from the Crypt and one from Shock SuspenStories. The stories include "Midnight Mess," "The Neat Job," "This Trick'll Kill You," "Bargain in Death" and "Drawn & Quartered" with a collection of character actors from the 70s: Terry-Thomas, Daniel Massey, Anna Massey, Curd Jurgans, Michael Craig, Glynis Johns and Tom Baker. This release marks the first time the film is presented uncut where at least four scenes are restored. While the film does not feature a Crypt Keeper nor Amicus anthology mainstay Peter Cushing, the film does continue the revenge themed terror and horror that makes these films so special. "Everything that makes life worth leaving!"

 

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Dec 15, 2014

"You were cruel and mean right from the start, now you can truly say you have no heart." Peter Cushing as Arthur Grimsdyke leaves a horrifying Valentines card for his murderers in Poetic Justice, one of the fantastic stories in the classic Amicus Anthology film Tales from the Crypt (20172). Inspired by the EC Comics in the fifties, Milton Subotsky pens a memorable, creepy tome featuring a deadly Santa, an antique with a deadly touch, a maze of death and more.  The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

 

Decades of Horror 1970s 
Episode 8 – Tales from the Crypt (1972) 

 

Tales from the Crypt is not the first horror anthology, it is not even the first from the British film company Amicus, but it may be the best remembered - if not, it should be. Drawing inspiration directly from the horror comics two decades earlier, the film ties together five short tales with a wrap around story featuring the Crypt Keeper. The Black Saint and Doc recap and review each story praising Peter Cushing in Poetic Justice and the creative revenge found in Blind Alleys. The film is responsible for inspiring two sequels, Vault of Horror and From Beyond the Grave, a loving tribute from Stephen King and George Romero with Creepshow and an HBO television that elevated the Crypt Keeper to a modern horror icon.

 

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Nov 29, 2014

"She Is Young, She Is Beautiful, She is Next...She's Living in the Gateway to Hell" The tag line for The Sentinel (1977) gives away the darkest secret of the big budgeted, big release horror film from Michael Winner based on the hit novel from Jeffrey Konvitz. The cast is insane and the effects are from the legendary Dick Smith.  The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

 

Decades of Horror 1970s 
Episode 6 – Squirm (1976) 

 

For The Sentinel, Doc Rotten and The Black Saint are joined by North Carolina writer/directory/fxartist Bill (400 Ways to Kill a Vampire, A Few Brains More) Mulligan to discuss the overlooked classic from 1977. If nothing else, the cast itself in impressive: Chris Sarandon, Cristina Raines, Ava Gardner & Burgess Meredith, with Martin Balsam, John Carradine, Jose Ferrer, Arthur Kennedy, Sylvia Miles, Deborah Raffin, Eli Wallach, Christopher Walken, Jerry Orbach, Beverly D'Angelo, Jeff Goldblum, Tom Berenger, William Hickey. A who's who of Hollywood then and now. The film is also notorious for the controversy surrounding the use of real "freaks" for the finale that spawned protests and discouraging reviews upon its release. Still the film has a horrific and genuinely frightening scene that places it at number 46 on Bravo's 100 Scariest Movie Moments (2004).

 

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Nov 7, 2014

"...by the billions they came, swarming over the land, sucking the life from anything in their path." The tag line promises Squirm (1979) will horrify and disgust you with the killer swarm of...worms. Wait? What? Worms? Yeah, worms! Director Jeff Lieberman delivers cinemas singular horror film featuring killer Glycera worms.  The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

 

Decades of Horror 1970s 
Episode 6 – Squirm (1976) 

 

Both Doc Rotten and The Black Saint fondly recall the impression the promotion stills from Famous Monsters of Filmland left upon even before they were able to catch the film: The Black Saint in the theater upon its original release and Doc with its television premiere. Now as they re-watch the film once again in celebration of its latest Blu-Ray release from Scream Factory, Doc and Saint revel in the gruesome worm closeups as the pour out of closets and drains and burrow their way into the face of Roger Grimes. Somehow, director Jeff Lieberman manages to exploit the squeamish, slimy attributes of the titular creatures attacking a southern household in rural Georgia. Creepy drive-in madness in only the way Seventies horror can provide.

 

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Sep 21, 2014

"She Lives. Don't Move. Don't Breathe. She Will Find You." The tag line promises Prophecy (1979) to be the next big "Monster Movie" with director John Frankenheimer behind the camera and David (The Omen) Selzer behind the pen. The film never lives up to that lofty goal but gives it everything it has. The film stars Robert Foxworth, Talia Shire, Armand Assante and Richard Dysart. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

 

Decades of Horror 1970s 
Episode 5 – Prophecy (1979) 

 

Joining The Black Saint and Doc Rotten once again is North Carolina film maker, Bill Mulligan, who lends his thespian, effects making, screen writing talents to the duo's take on Prophecy. The biggest problem with the film is the mutant bear itself, awkward and a little goofy, it draws more laughs that screams. Isely (Richard Dysart) describes the Katahdin monster was "larger than a dragon with the eyes of a cat" but it is often called the salami bear. Stephen King is known to have referenced the film as one of his favorites, Doc Rotten, The Black Saint and Bill Mulligan re-examine the film to roaring delight and cheep 70s thrills.

 

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

 

Sep 6, 2014

Considered a horror classic by many genre historians, The Wicker Man (1973) is the film for this episode. Featuring Edward Woodward, Christopher Lee, Britt Eckland and Ingrid Pitt, the film from director Robin Hardy leads its audience on a leisurely paced path to one of the more iconic endings in horror. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten tackle another groovy horror film from the 1970s.

 

Decades of Horror 1970s 
Episode 4 – The Wicker Man (1973) 

 

Joining The Black Saint and Doc Rotten is North Carolina film maker, Bill Mulligan, who lends his thespian, effects making, screen writing talents to the duo's take on The Wicker Man. The show explores the various cuts of the film; the efforts it took to make the film from screenwriter Anthony Shaffer and headliner Christopher Lee; and, all crazy songs scattered throughout the film. Bill, The Black Saint and Doc discuss the horror - or lack of it, the iconic ending and all the...um...forward thinking ways of the pagan Island of Summerisle. Good times!

 

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Aug 25, 2014

Haunted Houses are a tough genre to film. They can easily come off hokey or silly. There are some classics though, Haunting, The Amityville Horror and Poltergeist. But many are overlooked and forgotten. One such film is The Legend of Hell House from director John Hough featuring Pamela Franklin, Roddy McDowall, Clive Revill and Gayle Hunnicutt. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten are joined by award winning director Christopher G. Moore to discuss the British classic horror film. 

 

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 3 – The Legend of Hell House (1973)

 

Eventhough The Legend of Hell House springs from the mind of Richard Matheson, it lives in the shadows of The Exorcist and The Haunting. One film changed the face of horror overnight while the other is often seen to have done it better years before. This is a shame as The Legend of Hell House in an intelligent and often creepily effective haunted house film taking both a scientific and supernatural look at the forces behind the haunting. Christopher steps in this week to address the differences between the book, Hell House, and the John Hough directed film while Doc shares his love for the acting chops of Roddy McDowell. Santos fondly remembers seeing the film - in the theaters - when it was released. In the end, The Legend of Hell House is a film worth revisiting and reliving.

 

We want to hear from you - the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Mar 30, 2014

Doc Rotten and The Black Saint continue their examination of the horror films of the Seventies with David Cronenberg's The Brood featuring Oliver Reed, Samantha Eggar and Art Hindle. The director injects a ton of personal subtext into the script causing The Black Saint to believe Cronenberg may be exorcising some personal demons with The Brood. The film, while containing its signature shock ending, is a sign of the kind of films Cronenberg would dive into in the Eighties with Scanners, Videodrome and The Fly. Doc and The Black Saint take a look at an early entry into the body horror subgenre.

 

Decades of Horror 1970s 
Episode 2 – The Brood (1979) 

 

Decades of Horror 1970s is a monthly podcast taking a look back at the genre films that shaped the co-hosts' love for horror films at an early age. The Black Saint and Doc Rotten re-examine films from the most diverse and bizarre decade of horror in the genre's history, from the decline of Hammer Horror films to the rise of summer blockbusters to exploitations films and grindhouse. Carpenter, Cronenberg, Landis, Hooper, Scott, Coscarelli, Romero, Fulci and Argento are only a few of the great directors that would rise to fame from 1970 to 1979.

 

We want to hear from you, our valued listeners:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorro.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Feb 14, 2014

Welcome to the first episode of the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast with your hosts The Black Saint and Doc Rotten. Each month, the show will revisit one of the classic - or not so classic - horror films from the Seventies: b-movies, blockbusters, grindhouse gems and z-grade dreck. It's all about the films that shaped a generation of horror fans and the future of horror films as well.

 

For the first episode, The Black Saint has chosen the Rick Baker effects spectacle, The Incredible Melting Man from 1977. The movie was billed as "The First New Horror Creature," whatever that means. While Doc admits he walked out of the film back in 1977, The Black Saint loves the film, loves the cheese and all the zany nonsense. 

 

Decades of Horror 1970s 
Episode 1 – The Incredible Melting Man (1977) 

 

The Incredible Melting Man is a grand example of horror from the 1970s, ambitious, practical effects and out there - striving to reach new ground and make a lasting impression, regardless of how successful it may be at any of those goals. On the special features of the terrific Shout Factory Blu-Ray edition, director William Sachs sighs that most audiences didn't "get" the movie and its message; surprisingly, The Black Saint freely admits he too has no idea what Sachs is talking about with the film, but he still loves all the goofy plot holes and the terrific, gooey effects from legendary artists Rick Baker. 

 

We want to hear from you, our valued listeners:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at theblacksaint@decadesofhorro.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

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