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Now displaying: Category: Decades of Horror The Classic Era
Feb 13, 2021

"Haven't I convinced you of my sincerity yet? I'm genuinely dedicated to your destruction." Yup. Got it. Join this episode’s Grue-Crew - Whitney Collazo, Chad Hunt, Daphne Monary-Ernsdorff, and Jeff Mohr - as they revisit a cast and crew that, by now, seem like old friends in Tales of Terror (1962).

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 92 – Tales of Terror (1962)

Join the Crew on the Gruesome Magazine YouTube channel!
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Three tales of terror involve a grieving widower and the daughter he abandoned; a drunkard and his wife's black cat; and a hypnotist who prolongs the moment of a man's death.

IMDb

 

Your Decades of Horror Classic Era Grue-Crew make another trip to the land of Roger Corman, Richard Matheson, and Vincent Price in Tales of Terror, the fourth of the eight films in the AIP-Corman-Edgar Allan Poe group of movies.  This one is Whitney’s pick and in support of that pick, she says, “I mean, it’s Vincent Price!” She also appreciates the comedic center segment, “The Black Cat” and even more so because comedy is hard. You can’t go wrong with Matheson is Chad’s first take and he loves being able to see these legends in the same film. This is a first time viewing of Tales of Terror for Daphne, here for a repeat appearance after joining us for our episode on The Phantom Carriage (1920). She loves the variations she sees from Vincent Price as he portrays three different characters and is impressed with the strong and well-developed characters throughout, even though they are in short segments. Jeff also agrees that Tales of Terror is an excellent showcase for Price’s acting talents and absolutely loves Peter Lorre, one of his favorite actors.

This is a fun entry in the AIP-Corman-Poe canon, made even more enjoyable with the supporting cast of Peter Lorre, Basil Rathbone, Joyce Jameson, Debra Paget, David Frankham, Maggie Pierce, and Leona Gage. Tales of Terror is currently available to stream from Amazon Prime and EPIX, and on a Blu-ray disc from Kino Lorber Studio Classics. Check it out!

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror: The Classic Era records a new episode every two weeks. In the next episode, they will discuss a movie chosen by Jeff which will be Hammer’s Quatermass and the Pit (1967), written by Nigel Kneale and directed by Terence Fisher. You’ll want to be there for that one!

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you so much for listening!

Jan 30, 2021

"He who robs the graves of Egypt dies!" Well, most of them anyway. Join this episode’s Grue-Crew - Whitney Collazo, Chad Hunt, Jeff Mohr, and returning Joseph Perry - as they manage to avoid the nefarious consequences prophecied in Hammer’s The Mummy (1959).

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 91 – The Mummy (1959)

Join the Crew on the Gruesome Magazine YouTube channel!
Subscribe today! And click the alert to get notified of new content!
https://youtube.com/gruesomemagazine

In 1895, British archaeologists find and open the tomb of Egyptian Princess Ananka with nefarious consequences.

IMDb

 

Chad picked this Hammer gem and he loves the more active mummy as played by Christopher Lee and he appreciates the backstory provided as well. Whitney also approves and calls The Mummy a lot of fun. After all, how can you go wrong with Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee? For Joseph, the Christopher Lee mummy is a more threatening monster than that presented in Universal’s The Mummy (1932) by Boris Karloff. Jeff agrees that Christopher Lee puts his own indelible stamp on the movie’s title character and loves the elaborate sets seen in Hammer films that include Bernard Robinson’s production designs.

At the time of this writing, you can catch The Mummy streaming on various VOD sites. Check it out! You'll be glad you did!

You can check out the Classic Era’s episode on Universal’s original at The Mummy (1932) – Episode 11 – Decades Of Horror: The Classic Era

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror: The Classic Era records a new episode every two weeks. On their next episode, they will discuss Tales of Terror (1962), directed by Roger Corman, written by Richard Matheson, and starring Vincent Price, Peter Lorre, Basil Rathbone, Maggie Pierce, Leona Gage, Joyce Jameson, and Debra Paget. You’ll want to be there for that one.

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you so much for listening!

Jan 16, 2021

"You'll never catch a monkey that way." Well, Carl Denham oughta know. Join this episode’s Grue-Crew - Whitney Collazo, Chad Hunt, Jeff Mohr, and guest host and special effects artist Ed Martinez - as they make another journey to the jungles of Skull Island for a playdate with The Son of Kong (1933).

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 90 – The Son of Kong (1933)

The men who captured the giant ape King Kong return to Skull Island and find his likewise gigantic but far more friendly son.

IMDb

 

This episode signals the return of special effects artist Ed Martinez as a guest host. This time around, he has chosen The Son of Kong for the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era Grue-Crew to discuss. Ed thinks of The Son of Kong as being part of a trilogy begun by King Kong (1933) and completed with Mighty Joe Young (1949). In fact, he credits King Kong with his becoming a special effects artist. Chad thinks of King Kong and The Son of King Kong as one continuous story and whenever he watches King Kong, he usually follows it up with The Son of Kong. Expecting more of the same of what he got in King Kong, Jeff was a little disappointed the first time he saw The Son of Kong. Over time, however, he has come to appreciate the film and particularly likes the genesis of Carl Denham. Whitney loves the film even if it does feel a bit weird to describe a horror film with words like sweet and adorable. Of course, they all had to wonder, whatever happened to Queen Kong?

At the time of this writing, you can catch The Son of Kong streaming on HBOmax or as physical media on a Blu-ray disk from Warner Brothers. While you’re at it, make it a double feature with Pappa Kong’s movie and listen to one of our first Classic Era podcasts, Episode 4 - King Kong (1933).

Chad, Whitney, and Jeff give a big Grue-Crew thank you to Ed Martinez! His passion for and knowledge of stop-motion animation and his experience as a director of special effects and a special effects artist added immeasurably to this episode!

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror: The Classic Era records a new episode every two weeks. The next episode will see the return of fellow Grue-Crew member Joseph Perry to the podcast and Whitney, Chad, and Jeff can’t wait!  On that episode, they will discuss a movie chosen by Chad which will be The Mummy (1959), from Hammer Film s and starring Peter Cushing, Christopher Lee, and Yvette, Furneaux. You’ll want to be there for that one.

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you so much for listening!

Jan 2, 2021

"I'm told by a friend that you have some views for sale." Nudge, nudge, wink, wink. Join this episode’s Grue-Crew - Whitney Collazo, Chad Hunt, Jeff Mohr, and listener guest host Shawn Parks - as they become the voyeurs watching the voyeur murderer turning his victims into voyeurs of their own deaths in Michael Powell’s Peeping Tom (1960).

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 89 – Peeping Tom (1960)

A young man murders women, using a movie camera to film their dying expressions of terror.

IMDb

 

Peeping Tom elicited outrage from most film critics at its release, 4-5 months before the release of Hitchcock’s Psycho. Shawn, our listener guest host for this episode, picked Peeping Tom after he’d seen it referred to as a proto-slasher and also finds the juxtaposition of the artist as the obsessed killer interesting. Whitney loves the colors and shot construction right from the opening scene. As usual, Jeff points out some cast members who have appeared in other Decades of Horror episodes. Chad is impressed with the script and the multiple layers it contains.

While you might feel like you need a shower after viewing Peeping Tom, your Decades of Horror: The Classic Era Grue-Crew highly recommend it. As of this writing, Peeping Tom is a bit scarce in the US on physical media - a Criterion issue DVD of Peeping Tom is out-of-print while a UK-released (Region 0) Blu-ray is still available - but the film is available for streaming on Amazon Prime.

Chad, Whitney, and Jeff give a big Grue-Crew thank you to Shawn Parks! His film pick, research, and passion for the subject made this episode a joy! Be sure to check out Shawn on his own podcast, Talk Horror to Me.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror: The Classic Era records a new episode every two weeks. The next episode in their very flexible schedule, chosen by their next super-secret guest host, will be Son of Kong (1933).

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you so much for listening!

Dec 19, 2020

"I beg of you all not to lose your heads ... in any sense of the word." This is especially true when those about you are losing theirs. Join this episode’s Grue-Crew - Whitney Collazo, Chad Hunt, Jeff Mohr, and listener guest host Jerry Chandler - as they watch some heads being lost and marvel at the stop motion animation world of The Black Scorpion (1957).

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 88 – The Black Scorpion (1957)

Volcanic activity frees giant scorpions from the earth who wreak havoc in the rural countryside and eventually threaten Mexico City.

IMDb

 

The Black Scorpion features stop motion animation as supervised by Willis O’Brien and executed by Pete Peterson, Ralph Hammeras, and Wah Chang, and it does not disappoint in that category. Jerry first saw it before he was ten and it made a lasting impression. Scorpions were a bit of a childhood phobia for Whitney, so understandably, she was “a bit” uncomfortable with the film. Chad spent his childhood capturing scorpions and unsuccessfully trying to verify that the arachnids in The Black Scorpion behaved just as real-life scorpions behaved. He also loved that other creatures were found in the underground world of the giant scorpions. Jeff, too, was a big fan as a child and never missed a chance to catch The Black Scorpion after school.

Your Decades of Horror: The Classic Era Grue-Crew give this somewhat lesser-known giant insect movie a big recommendation for the special effects if for nothing else. As of this writing, The Black Scorpion is available to stream VOD and on physical media as a Blu-ray disc from Warner Brothers.

Chad, Whitney, and Jeff give a big Grue-Crew thank you to Jerry Chandler! They had great fun discussing The Black Scorpion with him and loved his comments on the giant insect subgenre.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror: The Classic Era records a new episode every two weeks. The next episode in their very flexible schedule, chosen by their next super-secret guest host, will be Peeping Tom (1960).

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you so much for listening!

Dec 5, 2020

“Love? Oh, I suppose that's what she called it. But it was more like a sickness. A fever that leaves the body burned out and dry.” That’s not most people’s idea of love. Join this episode’s Grue-Crew - Whitney Collazo, Chad Hunt, Jeff Mohr, and listener guest host Bill Gabriel - as they try to figure out who or what is innocent in The Innocents (1961).

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 87 – The Innocents (1961)

A young governess for two children becomes convinced that the house and grounds are haunted.

IMDb

 

The Innocents may be the definitive film version of Henry James’ “The Turn of the Screw.” Bill recalls which scene gave him a memorable scare when he was a 10-year-old boy and he places The Innocents as one of his top four ghost movies. Jeff is amazed by the cinematography of Freddie Francis and the way he deals with and utilizes Cinemascope’s 2.35:1 aspect ratio. Martin Stephens’ performance as Miles impresses Chad as does the writing, most of which was done by Truman Capote. Whitney is also impressed with the writing and how The Innocents is able to keep the viewer guessing as the ambiguous nature of the story is maintained from beginning to end.

If you haven’t seen The Innocents, you should correct that situation as soon as possible. At this writing. this masterpiece is available to stream on YouTube or on physical media as a Criterion Blu-ray.

Chad, Whitney, and Jeff give a big Grue-Crew thank you to Bill Gabriel! His film pick, research, and passion for the subject made this episode a joy!

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror: The Classic Era records a new episode every two weeks. The next episode in their very flexible schedule, chosen by their next super-secret guest host, will be The Black Scorpion (1957).

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you so much for listening!

Nov 21, 2020

“There is no telling what demons, snakes, and monsters live here in this grass.” Demons, monsters, and snakes, oh my! Join this episode’s Grue-Crew - Whitney Collazo, Chad Hunt, Jeff Mohr, and listener guest host Nick Gadman - as they try to hide in the tall, thick, grass growing everywhere in Onibaba (1964).

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 86 – Onibaba (1964)

Two women kill samurais and sell their belongings for a living. While one of them is having an affair with their neighbor, the other woman meets a mysterious samurai wearing a bizarre mask.

IMDb

 

Kaneto Shindô’s Onibaba made a very big impression on your Decades of Horror: The Classic Era Grue-Crew. Nick picked this one and an excellent pick it is.He expounds on the two strong and well-developed, female characters that dominate the cast of Onibaba. Whitney echoes Nick’s fascination with the “Older Woman” and the “Younger Woman,” but focuses on their relationship, adding perspective from her cultural background. The quality and depth of Onibaba surprises and impresses Chad and he loves how a supernatural aspect enters the story. Jeff is impressed enough that he watched Kunerko (1968), another of Kaneto Shindô’s and loved that as well. Of course, they can’t forget the mask, the one most horror fans recognize even if they haven’t seen Onibaba

It will be obvious that the Grue-Crew highly recommends Onibaba! In the U.S., as of this writing, the film is available to stream from HBOmax and The Criterion Channel or on DVD physical media from Criterion.

Chad, Whitney, and Jeff give a big Grue-Crew thank you to Nick Gadman for his extensive research and insightful contributions to this episode! 

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror: The Classic Era records a new episode every two weeks. The next episode in their very flexible schedule, chosen by their next super-secret guest host, will be The Innocents (1961), based on The Turn of the Screw (1898), the celebrated novella by Henry James that also provided the foundation for the recent Netflix miniseries, The Haunting of Bly Manor

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you so much for listening!

Nov 8, 2020

“Though horse and carriage are always the same, the driver is not. The last soul to die each year - the one who passes over at the stroke of midnight - is destined to be Death's driver for the following year.” Sounds like a good gig except they left out the “one night is like 100 years” part. Join this episode’s Grue-Crew - Whitney Collazo, Chad Hunt, Jeff Mohr, and listener guest host Daphne Monary-Ernsdorff - as they travel to Sweden for a silent ride in The Phantom Carriage (1921).

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 85 – The Phantom Carriage (1921)

On New Year's Eve, the driver of a ghostly carriage forces a drunken man to reflect on his selfish, wasted life.

IMDb

 

Victor Sjöström’s The Phantom Carriage is a groundbreaking silent film for both its narrative structure and its multiple exposure visual effects. This episode’s Grue-Crew marveled at the depth of the character development. They’re also wowed by the effective use of up to four-layered multiple exposures. The film also incorporates social problems of the times - alcoholism and tuberculosis - that resonate with ills of the current times. Of course, the crew discusses the legendary scene that inspired the “Heeere’s Johnny” scene in Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining (1980).

The Grue-Crew universally regard The Phantom Carriage as a remarkable film. It is currently available to stream on the Criterion Channel and on physical media as a Criterion Blu-ray disk.

Chad, Whitney, and Jeff give a big Grue-Crew thank you to Daphne Monary-Ernsdorff for her insightful contributions to this episode … and for reading the book! 

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror: The Classic Era records a new episode every two weeks. The next episode in their very flexible schedule, chosen by their next super-secret guest host, will be Onibaba (1964), a Japanese film written and directed by Kaneto Shindô, loosely based on a Shin Buddhist parable.

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you so much for listening!

Oct 24, 2020

“Father, the bullet. Pepe the watchman has a silver bullet. Get it and use it. Use it on me, father! You must use it -- do you hear? You must use it! You must!” Yes. He heard. Join this episode’s Grue-Crew - Whitney Collazo, Chad Hunt, Jeff Mohr, and listener guest host Alistair Hughes - as they take a trip to the land of Hammer Horror for The Curse of the Werewolf (1961).

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 84 – The Curse of the Werewolf (1961)

In 18th Century Spain, an adopted boy becomes a werewolf and terrorizes the inhabitants of his town.

IMDb

 

The Curse of the Werewolf (1961), directed by Terence Fisher and starring Oliver Reed, is Hammer Film’s one-off werewolf film and a doozy it is! This is Chad’s pick and he describes it as being one of his top five favorite werewolf films, especially liking the role love plays in the story’s werewolf mythos. The werewolf makeup captures Whitney’s attention as she explains how an individual’s skin and hair pigment varies. Jeff is impressed by the effects and acting in the final scene of The Curse of the Werewolf. Al provides several detailed tidbits, one of which regarding Roy Ashton, the creator of the film’s werewolf special makeup effect. Of course, the entire Grue-Crew is enthralled with Oliver Reed’s performance!

At this writing, The Curse of the Werewolf is available for streaming in the US on Peacock. Jeff highly recommends the Scream Factory Blu-ray, also available in the U.S.

Chad, Whitney, and Jeff give a big Grue-Crew thank you to Alistair Hughes for his insightful and informational contributions to this episode! Al is also the author of Infogothic: An Unauthorised Graphic Guide to Hammer Horror. Every fan of Hammer horror films should have a copy and the holidays are just around the bend, so what are you waiting for?

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror: The Classic Era records a new episode every two weeks. The next episode in their very flexible schedule, chosen by their next super-secret guest host, will be The Phantom Carriage (1921), a Swedish silent scream from director Victor Sjöström. Be sure to join us for that one!

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you so much for listening!

Oct 10, 2020

“In my hunt for food, I had become the hunted. This time I survived, but I was no longer alone in my universe. I had an enemy, the most terrifying ever beheld by human eyes.” You’ll get no argument here! Join this episode’s Grue-Crew - Whitney Collazo, Chad Hunt, Jeff Mohr, and guest host Ralph Miller (special effects artist) - as they journey into the ever-shrinking world of The Incredible Shrinking Man (1957).

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 83 – The Incredible Shrinking Man (1957)

When Scott Carey begins to shrink because of exposure to a combination of radiation and insecticide, medical science is powerless to help him.

IMDb

 

When Richard Matheson and Jack Arnold pair up, the result is The Incredible Shrinking Man, a thought-provoking science fiction-horror film complete with an escape from a now terrifying housecat and a battle to the death with a tarantula. This one is Jeff’s pick and is one of his favorite movies from childhood. Chad is also a big fan and loves the existential soliloquy that closes out the film. Of course, special effects are Ralph’s bailiwick and he delves into each of the different techniques used in The Incredible Shrinking Man. Whitney astutely sees a connection between The Incredible Shrinking Man and the body horror subgenre.

Your Classic Era Grue-Crew gives this one a strong recommendation. At this writing,  The Incredible Shrinking Man is available for streaming on Peacock or for a fee on multiple streaming sites. Unfortunately, at this time, Blu-ray editions are few and far between and The Incredible Shrinking Man has yet to receive an in-depth treatment with extras.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror: The Classic Era records a new episode every two weeks. The next episode in their very flexible schedule is chosen by Chad and will The Curse of the Werewolf (1961), a Hammer classic directed by Terence Fisher. Be sure to join us for that one!

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you so much for listening!

Sep 26, 2020

“Just because something isn't good doesn't mean it's bad.” But, in this case, it could be pretty great. Join this episode’s Grue-Crew - Whitney Collazo, Joseph Perry, and Jeff Mohr - as they get to know the members of the Merrye family, especially the one known as Spider Baby (1967).

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 82 – Spider Baby (1967)

In a dilapidated rural mansion, the last generation of the degenerate, inbred Merrye family lives with the inherited curse of a disease that causes them to mentally regress from the age of 10 or so on as they physically develop. The family chauffeur looks out for them and covers up their indiscretions. Trouble comes when greedy distant relatives and their lawyer arrive to dispossess the family of its home.

IMDb

 

Your Decades of Horror Classic Era Grue-Crew is understandably enamored of Spider Baby and who wouldn’t be? Lon Chaney Jr., Sid Haig, and the rest of the cast shine in Jack Hill’s low-budget macabre comedy. Jeff is particularly impressed with the detail and depth packed into nearly every scene. The film is still just as macabre and weird and darkly humorous as Joseph remembers it to be the first time he experienced it. Whitney gives a heartfelt remembrance of Sid Haig and expresses how much she enjoyed his performance in Spider Baby.

If you haven’t seen Spider Baby or even seen it lately, the Classic Era Grue-Crew thinks you should hit it again soon! At the time of this writing, Spider Baby is available to stream on Amazon Prime and as a Blu-ray disc from Arrow Video.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror: The Classic Era puts out a new episode every two weeks. The next episode in their very flexible schedule is chosen by Jeff and will be The Incredible Shrinking Man (1957), directed by Jack Arnold and written by Richard Matheson.

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you so much for listening!

Sep 13, 2020

“I have conquered science! Why can't I conquer love?” That’s the age-old question, isn’t it? Join this episode’s Grue-Crew - Whitney Collazo, Chad Hunt, Joseph Perry, and Jeff Mohr - as they show some mad love for Peter Lorre’s performance in Mad Love (1935).

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 81 – Mad Love (1935)

Paris, France: a demented surgeon's obsession with a British actress leads him to secretly replace her concert pianist husband's train-wreck-mangled hands with those of a guillotined murderer. . . with a gift for knife-throwing.

IMDb

 

Your Decades of Horror: The Classic Era Grue-Crew finally got around to Mad Love, the 1935 gem directed by Karl Freund and featuring a stellar performance from Peter Lorre. Whitney is impressed by how Yvonne Orlac handles the excessive creepiness of Dr. Gogol. Ted Healy and May Beatty, as an American reporter and Dr. Gogol’s maid, provide needed comic relief from the rest of the film’s heavy tone and tickle Chad’s and Joseph’s funnybones. Jeff points out Oscar-winner Gregg Toland’s involvement as the cinematographer of Mad Love.

It’s unfortunate that Mad Love has limited streaming or Blu-ray availability at this writing. Lorre’s performance alone is worth a quality, in-depth treatment, and Mad Love has much to offer beyond that.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror: The Classic Era puts out a new episode every two weeks. The next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Spider Baby or, the Maddest Story Ever Told (1967), chosen by Whitney.

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you so much for listening!

Aug 29, 2020

“Giants can run fast. They have long legs.” … and they sure are hungry! Join this episode’s Grue-Crew - Whitney Collazo, Chad Hunt, Jeff Mohr, and special guest host Ralph Miller - as they journey to one of Bert I. Gordon’s many lands of the giants to witness War of the Colossal Beast (1958).

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 80 – War of the Colossal Beast (1958)

Glenn Manning, "The Amazing Colossal Man," believed dead after falling from the Hoover Dam, reemerges in rural Mexico, brain damaged, disfigured, and very hungry.

IMDb

 

War of the Colossal Beast is Bert I. Gordon’s, aka Mr. BIG’s, sequel to The Amazing Colossal Man (1957) that wasn’t marketed as a sequel. Jeff wishes the filmmakers had taken advantage of several situations to insert more mayhem into the film. Whitney appreciates Jack Young’s special effects makeup and the colossal man’s sister’s purity of purpose in looking out for her brother. Chad is glad the film is only 69 minutes long but is understandably taken with how articulate the colossal man is. Joseph describes War of the Colossal Beast as the Bert I. Gordon-est of Bert I. Gordon’s films. The Classic Era Grue Crew also wants to make sure you don’t forget that the last minute of the film is … IN COLOR!!!

The colossal man, as depicted in War of the Colossal Beast, is an iconic image from 1950’s horror films. As of this writing, the film can be streamed from Amazon Prime and on a Scream Factory Blu-ray.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror: The Classic Era puts out a new episode every two weeks. The next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Mad Love (1935), chosen by Joseph.

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you so much for listening!

Aug 16, 2020

“Here, young maiden, take a potion of cat feces and dove hearts, boiled during the full moon. A drop of this in a man's drink will soften his heart at once.” Yummy, yummy, yummy. I’ve got love in my tummy. Join this episode’s Grue-Crew - Whitney Collazo, Chad Hunt, Jeff Mohr and special guest host Ralph Miller - as they learn about witchcraft through the ages with Benjamin Christensen’s innovative silent film, Häxan (1922).

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 79 – Häxan (1922)

Part history lesson followed by re-enactments with actors, this film depicts the history of witchcraft from its earliest days through to the present day (in this case, 1922 or thereabouts). The result is a documentary-like film that must be among the first to use re-enactments as a visual and narrative tool. From pagan worship to satanic rites to hysteria, the film takes you on a journey through the ages with highly effective visual sequences.

IMDb

 

Your Decades of Horror: The Classic Era Grue-Crew takes a deeper dive than usual into Häxan. As an innovative, seminal film, it demands the added attention. Crewmate Joseph Perry is unable to join the Grue-Crew for this episode but special effects artist Ralph Miller is an eager and more than able guest host. 

Ralph considers Häxan to be quite an ambitious film, especially for the time, with its imagery of witches and the devil. Whitney is stunned by the beautiful yet very strange artistry of Häxan, which is unlike anything she’s ever seen. The images that played out in the film were startling to Chad, but what really grabbed him is how superstition and mental illness led to women experiencing accusations of witchcraft, persecution, suffering, and death. 

If you haven’t seen Häxan, you need to remedy that condition immediately. If you haven’t seen it for a while, it’s time to watch it again. The film is readily available to stream from various sources and on a stunning Criterion Blu-ray.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror: The Classic Era puts out a new episode every two weeks. The next episode in their very flexible schedule will be War of the Colossal Beast (1958), chosen by Chad.

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you so much for listening!

Aug 2, 2020

“You don't think I sat there all evening with an eight-foot mamba in my pocket?” No, she thought you were just glad to see her. (Too easy?) Join this episode’s Grue-Crew - Whitney Collazo, Chad Hunt, and Jeff Mohr - as they discover which is the most dangerous animal found in Murders in the Zoo (1933).

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 78 – Murders in the Zoo (1933)

A monomaniacal zoologist is pathologically jealous of his beautiful but unfaithful wife Evelyn and will not stop short of murder to keep her.

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Your Decades of Horror Classic Era Grue-Crew is delighted by this little known, pre-code classic film. Murders in the Zoo’s gruesome opening scene sets the tone for the entire film. Whitney is suitably disgusted by Lionel Atwill’s performance as the monomaniacal zoologist of the synopsis and is also impressed with the strength of Gail Patrick’s character and the arc of Kathleen Burke’s character. Chad thinks Charlie Ruggles adds just the right amount of humor when needed to lighten this heavy affair. A disturbing scene shot in the zoo with tragic results is described by Jeff as is the future career of cinematographer Ernest Haller.

If you haven’t seen Murders in the Zoo, your loyal Grue-Crew give it a strong recommendation. The film is currently available for streaming on Amazon Prime and on Blu-ray as one of four films included in Scream Factory’s Universal Horror Collection Volume 2.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror: The Classic Era puts out a new episode every two weeks. The next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Häxan (1922), the silent classic. A special guest will be joining them so be sure to check-in for the next episode.

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you so much for listening!

Jul 19, 2020

“What you see is real. What's done is done and what I've done is right. It's the work of science.” Who can argue with science, right? Join this episode’s Grue-Crew - Whitney Collazo, Chad Hunt, Joseph Perry, Jeff Mohr, and guest Sammie Cassell - as they get all sciency with The Brain that Wouldn’t Die (1962).

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 77 – The Brain That Wouldn’t Die (1962)

A doctor experimenting with transplant techniques keeps his girlfriend's head alive when she is decapitated in a car crash, then goes hunting for a new body.

IMDb

 

Your Decades of Horror Classic Era Grue-Crew find much to fault and much to love with a generous portion of cheese to top it off in The Brain That Wouldn’t Die. Filmed in 1959 and released three years later, The Brain That Wouldn’t Die must be viewed through 1959 eyes to be enjoyed. Sexist behavior, attitudes, and dialogue abound and Dr. Bill Cortner, the character with the most screen time, has a likeability factor of zero. On the other hand, the image of Virginia Leith as “Jan-in-the-Pan” is riveting and somehow extremely disturbing.

This episode’s Grue-Crew recommends The Brain That Wouldn’t Die for its iconic and disturbing imagery. As of this writing. The film is available on a Blu-ray from Scream Factory and streaming on Amazon Prime Video.  

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror: The Classic Era puts out a new episode every other week. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be a Whitney Collazo pick, Murders in the Zoo (1932).

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you so much for listening!

Jul 4, 2020

“I kissed her as she lay there in the coffin; and her lips were cold.” He was expecting something else? Join this episode’s Grue Crew - Whitney Collazo, Chad Hunt, Joseph Perry, and Jeff Mohr - as they take a trip back to the pre-code days with White Zombie (1932).

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 76 – White Zombie (1932)

A young man turns to a witch doctor to lure the woman he loves away from her fiancé, but instead turns her into a zombie slave.

IMDb

 

The Decades of Horror Classic Era Grue-Crew had all seen dribs and drabs of White Zombie but none of them had seen the complete film ... until now, and boy, howdy, do they regret it. Joseph is impressed by cinematographer Arthur Martinelli's use of light and shadow and Whitney zeroes in on a very strange and awkward scene that takes place in a sugar mill. Now restored scenes that had previously been cut are identified by Jeff.  The movie is far better than Chad expected and even though he’s not a fan of voodoo zombies, he recommends White Zombie to everyone. In fact, each of the members of your loyal Grue-Crew are impressed with this film.

At this writing, White Zombie is streaming on Amazon Prime and a Blu ray is available from Kino Classics.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror: The Classic Era is part of the Decades of Horror 3-week rotation with the 1970s and 1980s. In three weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be a Joseph Perry pick, The Brain that Wouldn’t Die (1962).

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you so much for listening!

Jun 25, 2020

“I don't like to see anybody buried naked. ... I don't ... I just don't.”  Did that really need to be said? Join this episode’s Grue Crew - Whitney Collazo, Chad Hunt, Joseph Perry, and Jeff Mohr - as they take in The Comedy of Terrors (1963), an AIP production filled with horror icons.

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 75 – The Comedy of Terrors (1963)

Dishonest undertaker Waldo Trumbull and his sidekick Felix Gillie are creating their own customers when they cannot find willing ones

IMDb

 

Wow! A film directed by Jacques Tourneur, written by Richard Matheson, and starring Vincent Price, Peter Lorre, Joyce Jameson, Boris Karloff, Basil Rathbone, and Joe E. Brown! What could possibly go wrong? About that …

Jeff absolutely loves The Comedy of Terrors revealing it’s like an old friend from his childhood. Whitney, Chad, and Joseph, however, are not so enamored of the film. They still recommend The Comedy of Terrors, explaining that it’s not a bad film; it just doesn’t live up to the expectations they had considering its star-studded cast and crew.

Whitney says you should see the film because it’s one of the few times she has seen Peter Lorre end up with the girl. Joseph keeps trying to understand how the film went wrong but plans a rewatch when he learns the score is composed by Les Baxter. While he did get a few chuckles, Chad finds the humor dated. Jeff doesn’t argue with any of them but his affection for the film is unwavering.

The Grue-Crew also read listener feedback regarding Episode 73 - Curse of the Undead (1959) from Jerry Chandler and Alistair Hughes. Jerry helps clarify Romanian vampire legends and provides a link to one of his blogposts, Know Your Monsters - The Romanian Vampire.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror: The Classic Era is part of the Decades of Horror 3-week rotation with the 1970s and 1980s. In three weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be White Zombie (1932), starring Bela Lugosi.

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you so much for listening!

Apr 26, 2020

“Oh, the dead don’t bother me. It’s the living that give me trouble.”  Join this episode’s Grue Crew - Whitney Collazo, Chad Hunt, Joseph Perry, and Jeff Mohr - as they take a trip to an American west populated by a vampire gunslinger and a passel of excellent character actors to experience Curse of the Undead (1959).

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 73 – Curse of the Undead (1959)

A mysterious gunslinger-for-hire, Drake Robey, is really a vampire, and it's up to Preacher Dan to save the town and girlfriend Dolores Carter.

IMDb

 

Universal's Curse of the Undead is unique to American cinema as one of, if not the first vampire western. Nothing else pops up until Billy the Kid vs. Dracula in 1966. The Decades of Horror Classic Era Grue-Crew are impressed with the film even though it has the feel of a TV-western of the era with minimal blood and no gore.

Whitney keys in on the character arc of Dolores Carter (Kathleen Crowley) as she goes from a protective daughter and sister to head honcho of a cattle ranch. This film develops its own vampire mythology, an aspect Chad appreciates. Joseph likes director Edward Dein’s use of light and shadow to increase the impact of some of the scenes and Jeff delves into the background of the male leads Eric Fleming and Michael Pate.

The obvious effort put into this film by the cast and crew leads the Grue-Crew to recommend Curse of the Undead. If you’re into westerns or 1950s to 1970s television, the recommendation is even stronger as you will most definitely recognize most of the cast.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror: The Classic Era is part of the Decades of Horror 3-week rotation with the 1970s and 1980s. In three weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be the Hammer classic The Devil Rides Out (1968), directed by Terence Fischer, written by Richard Matheson from a Dennis Wheatley novel, and starring Christopher Lee.

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you so much for listening!

Apr 13, 2020

“You gotta hit 'em right in the puss with the grenades if you wanna stop 'em major!”  Seems like that goes without saying, doesn’t it? Join this episode’s Grue Crew - Chad Hunt, Joseph Perry, and Jeff Mohr - as they do there best not to fall into the sand vortex found in Invaders from Mars (1953).

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 72 – Invaders from Mars (1953)

Awakened during a thunderstorm, youngster David MacLean witnesses a flying saucer disappear underground in the large sandpit behind his home. When his father investigates, he returns a changed man; soon David's mother, a young neighbor girl, and others begin to act in the same way. Begging the police for help, David's panicked story is heard by Dr. Pat Blake, who takes him to astronomer Dr. Stuart Kelston. David soon convinces Kelston, who comes to believe this is an invading vanguard from Mars.

IMDb

 

Your Decades of Horror: The Classic Era Grue Crew all prefer the original 1953 version of Invaders from Mars to the Tobe Hooper 1986 remake. Jeff points out the somewhat surreal parts of the score contributed by Mort Glickman, while Joseph describes the kindertrauma he experienced after viewing the “golden head” Martian. Chad seems to be unduly disturbed by the pronunciation of the word “mutants” used in the film.

The 1953 version of Invaders from Mars is definitely worth your time. At this writing, it is available for streaming on Amazon Prime.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror: The Classic Era is part of the Decades of Horror 3-week rotation with the 1970s and 1980s. In three weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be the vampire western, Curse of the Undead (1959).

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you so much for listening!

Mar 9, 2020

"My God, Henry! What you've done ... it's satanic!"  In this case, the Henry being referred to is Dr. Henry Jekyll as played by Jack Palance. Join this episode’s Grue Crew - Chad Hunt, Joseph Perry, Whitney Collazo, and Jeff Mohr - as they get strange with the Dan Curtis version of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1968).

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 71 – The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1968)

Dr. Henry Jekyll experiments with scientific means of revealing the hidden, dark side of man and releases a murderer from within himself.

IMDb

 

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is the fifth TV-movie produced by Dan Curtis and covered by a Decades of Horror Grue-Crew, and it doesn’t disappoint. Jeff chose this film because the visage of Jack Palance in Dick Smith’s makeup as Mr. Hyde and his maniacal, cackling laugh, have stuck with him for over fifty years since he first saw it on the small screen. For Chad, this version of Robert Louis Stevenson’s novella leaps into second place behind the 1932 release starring Fredric March. High praise, indeed. Whitney enjoyed the film but, in terms of the makeup for Mr. Hyde, thinks that when viewed through a modern-day lens, it looks like a botched Botox encounter. The 2-hour length gave Joseph pause, but after viewing the film, he marveled at the pacing and even flow of the story.

Your Decades of Horror Classic Era Grue-Crew gives The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde a strong recommendation. As of this writing, it is available to stream on Amazon Prime and on DVD from MPI Home Video.

For more films produced by Dan Curtis and discussed on Decades of Horror, go back and check out these episodes from Decades of Horror 1970s:

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror: The Classic Era is part of the Decades of Horror 3-week rotation with the 1970s and 1980s. In three weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be the science fiction-horror classic, Invaders from Mars (1953).

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you so much for listening!

Feb 13, 2020

“Ohhh, in other words, you don’t want to pick the pick because the pick is a pick and a shovel isn’t the pick. If you pick the pick to pick, the shovel isn’t the pick." "Now you’ve got it." "Now I got it. I don’t even know what I’m talking about." These quotes are all you need to know who stars in this episode’s film. Join this episode’s Grue Crew - Chad Hunt, Whitney Collazo, and Jeff Mohr - as they get lost in the desert with Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy (1955).

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 70 – Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy (1955)

Bud and Lou find themselves pursued by an Egyptian cult for a special medallion linked to a walking mummy.

IMDb

 

Your Decades of Horror Classic Era Grue-Crew chose Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy as their second Abbott and Costello Universal Monster film after covering Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein in episode 44. Though Meet Frankenstein is obviously the cream of the crop, Whitney, Chad, and Jeff think this one is a bit underrated despite the ridiculous mummy costume. Whitney digs Marie Windsor’s portrayal of the smartest-one-in-the-room bad-girl and the way she puts up with the rest of the idiots surrounding her. Once again, Jeff overdoes it when it comes to delving into the character actors in the cast. Chad is all about Batman and connections to the Caped Crusader abound in this film.

If you dig the comic duo at all and are a Universal Monster fan (of course you are), Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy is worth your time. Your faithful Grue-Crew laughed and you will too. It’s available on Blu ray in multiple releases, most recently Shout! Factory’s Abbott & Costello: The Complete Universal Pictures Collection.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror: The Classic Era is part of the Decades of Horror 3-week rotation with the 1970s and 1980s. In three weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1968), a Dan Curtis production starring Jack Palance, Denholm Elliott, and Billie Whitelaw.

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you so much for listening!

Jan 22, 2020

“From Marquette, Canada today comes word of a second ship destroyed by an enormous beast according to her Captain, George LeMay. He really ought to stop smoking that stuff and try Virginia Golds.” Well, as you might have guessed, it wasn’t the stuff he’d been smoking. Join this episode’s Grue Crew - Chad Hunt, Whitney Collazo, Joseph Perry, and Jeff Mohr - as they leapfrog from the arctic to New York City to join the battle to stop The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms (1953)!

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 69 – The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms (1953)

A ferocious dinosaur awakened by an Arctic atomic test terrorizes the North Atlantic and, ultimately, New York City.

IMDb

 

The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms is a landmark film for many reasons. Inspired by the success of a re-release of King Kong (1933) in 1952, it’s success, in turn, inspired Toho to move forward with the production of Godzilla (1954). It also gave Ray Harryhausen his first shot as head of special effects on a feature film and provided one of Ray Bradbury’s first paychecks for a feature film. The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms was also the first film featuring a giant creature that exists as the result of an atomic explosion. Put Eugène Lourié in the director’s chair, John L. Russell behind the camera, and enlist a supporting cast of topnotch character actors and you have a recipe for success.

All members of your Classic Era Grue-Crew love this film and appreciate its place in film history. They gush over Harryhausen’s stop-motion animation skills and dedication, the direction, cinematography, script, and cast. If you haven’t seen this film for a while, it might be time to revisit The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms. It’s a gem of a film. 

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror: The Classic Era is part of the Decades of Horror 3-week rotation with the 1970s and 1980s. In three weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy (1953).

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you so much for listening!

Jan 4, 2020

“It is my considered opinion that rat No. 4 is sitting inside that cat.” Ha! The jokes on you, Jennings! It’s actually in your pocket. Join this episode’s Grue Crew - Chad Hunt Whitney Collazo, Joseph Perry, and Jeff Mohr - as they take a trip to Marineland to see the Gill-Man in his second theatrical outing, Revenge of the Creature (1955).

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 68 – Revenge of the Creature (1955)

The Creature from the Black Lagoon has been captured by scientists and transported to an aquarium in south Florida. Once there, he becomes attracted to lovely female scientist Helen Dobson and manages to escape and kidnap her, and heads to Jacksonville, with her real-life love in pursuit.

IMDb

 

Universal International Pictures followed up the success of Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954) the following year with Revenge of the Creature, another 3-D entry to the Univeral Horror catalog. Chad Hunt continues his love for the Gill-man, first revealed in episode 3 of Decades of Horror: The Classic Era. Your loyal Grue-Crew note the differences between this film and its predecessor, both in the pacing of the story and in the Florida setting. They are also impressed by the performance turned in by Lori Nelson as scientist Helen Dobson. Of course, Clint Eastwood also comes up in conversation. They all recommend Revenge of the Creature despite its marked departure from the feel and tone of the first film in the series.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror: The Classic Era is part of the Decades of Horror 3-week rotation with the 1970s and 1980s. In three weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms (1953).

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you so much for listening!

Nov 26, 2019

“Many men have gone there. Few have returned. I have returned. After fifteen years... I have returned.” Dr. Vitus Werdegast delivers this line with a grave determination that tells you he has vengeance on his mind. Join this episode’s Grue Crew - Joseph Perry, Chad Hunt, and Jeff Mohr - as they witness Werdegast exact his gruesome revenge in The Black Cat (1934), a Universal production featuring Bela Lugosi and Boris Karloff in the first of their pairings.

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 67 – The Black Cat (1934)

American honeymooners in Hungary become trapped in the home of a Satan-worshiping priest when the bride is taken there for medical help following a road accident.

- IMDb

 

Edgar Ulmer’s The Black Cat shares nothing with Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Black Cat” beside a title and the presence of the titular character. Your loyal Grue-Crew is astounded by the film’s subject matter which includes genocide, PTSD, satanic worship, human sacrifice, and skinning a person. Being the first of eight Lugosi and Karloff pairings, this episode’s crew also thinks it is the best. Joseph identifies another of Ulmer’s films as a personal favorite while Chad is enamored of Lugosi getting a chance to play a good guy, or at least not the worst guy. Jeff speculates on how the film’s release date just prior to full implementation of the Hays Code might have affected the plot.

If you haven’t seen The Black Cat, this episode’s co-hosts highly recommend you seek it out, either online or in Scream Factory’s Blu ray boxed-set that includes the film along with three other Universal pairings of Lugosi and Karloff.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror: The Classic Era is part of the Decades of Horror 3-week rotation with the 1970s and 1980s. In three weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be The Revenge of the Creature (1955), from Universal and directed by Jack Arnold. 

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: The Classic Era podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you so much for listening!

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