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Now displaying: Category: Monster Movie Podcast
Aug 21, 2018

"Sleep all day. Party all night. Never grow old. Never die. It's fun to be a vampire." The tag-line for The Lost Boys (1987) captures the "Peter Pan" spirit of this classic Eighties vampire tale, romanticizing the creatures in an approachable and thrilling young adult spin without sacrificing the horror and the thrills. No sparkles here, folks! Josh Schafer joins Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore to revisit the film that solidified Joel Schumacher as a directing talent...well, at least until bat-nipples did him in.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 137 – The Lost Boys (1987)

Released in 1987, The Lost Boys introduced horror fans to a variety of iconic horror flash and style rarely matched in this day-and-age. This is the first film to provide fans with the "Two-Coreys" teaming Corey Haim and Corey Feldman together - even though Feldman has Jamison Newlander and Frog Brothers wingman. Keifer Sutherland makes a striking impression as David, the blonde leader of the gothic punk vampires and Jason Patric (son of Exorcist star Jason Miller) emo-acts his way into every young girl's heart. And, above all, we have shirtless, oiled Timmy Cappello belting out "I Still Beleive" - what else do you need.

Christopher G. Moore, Doc Rotten, and guest-host Josh Schafer from Lunchmeat VHS gather to take a look at The Lost Boys perhaps one of the best and most influential vampire movies of the Eighties. The Grue-Crew debate the merit of director Joel Schumacher and whether Grampa was a werewolf in an alternate "Mandela Effect" universe. It's all about the style, the clothes, the stars, and the songs; The Lost Boys holds up well after 30+ years and the Grue-Crew reflect on it all. "One thing about living in Santa Carla I never could stomach; all the damn vampires."

A mother and her two sons move to a small coast town in California. The town is plagued by bikers and some mysterious deaths. The younger boy makes friends with two other boys who claim to be vampire hunters while the older boy is drawn into the gang of bikers by a beautiful girl. The older boy starts sleeping days and staying out all night while the younger boy starts getting into trouble because of his friends' obsession.

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at christopher@gruesomemagazine.com or dave@gruesomemagazine.com or docrotten@gruesomemagazine.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Episode

Predator

 

Jul 18, 2018

"There's a thing... out here. It took my little girl. I wasn't prepared to stop it then but I'm gonna stop it now." George Kennedy as Bill Crafton warns David Michael O'Neill, Pamela Gilbert, and Billy Jacoby about a demon Bigfoot creature roaming the woods. Little do they know that director Emmett Alston has far more in store for them than a furry Wendigo beast - hidden in a cave are zombies, spaceships, aliens, and a cult leader sacrificing nubile young women. What the what? Thankfully George has his awesome yellow hat. Woot!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 136 – Demonwarp (1988)

Released in 1988, Demonwarp originated from the twisted mind of John Carl Beuchler - who was originally set to direct but left production to tackle Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood. Who can blame him? Acadamy Award winner George Kennedy spends 3 days on set to give the film some pedigree. The film promises Bigfoot vs George Kennedy and it delivers that regardless of how good - or bad - the Bigfoot looks. Thankfully we also have Michelle Bauer on hand to liven up the scenery.

Christopher G. Moore, Doc Rotten, and Dave Dreher gather to take a look at Demonwarp perhaps one of the stranges monster movies of the Eighties. Christopher and Doc share watching the film on the big screen recently at the Raleigh Alamo Drafthouse theater in all its VHS glory - a perfect way to experience this goofy wonky classic. Dave remembers grabbing this one off the rental shelves in 1988 and was thrilled to revisit this schlockfest. Settle in and listen to the Grue-Crew recap and review a rare, hard-to-find Mom-and-Pop VHS shop staple.

A vengeance-crazed hunter searching for his daughter...Five youths stalking an inhuman mutation...They have just stepped into the alien-spawned realm of Demonwarp...and a wave of unearthly terror is about to begin

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at christopher@gruesomemagazine.com or dave@gruesomemagazine.com or docrotten@gruesomemagazine.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Next Episode

The Burning

Jun 15, 2018

"Darkness falls across the land. The midnight hour is close at hand. Creatures crawl in search of blood. To terrorize y’all’s neighborhood." Vincent Price helps make Michael Jackson's Thriller one of the best horror-themed music videos of the 1980s along with director John Landis and special make-up effects designed and created by Rick Baker. Breaking out of our norm of covering horror films of the decades, for our special 2nd year anniversary episode we dive into the music videos that defined the Eighties, especially those with a tinge of horror to them. Join Dave Dreher, Christopher G. Moore, and Doc Rotten on this special visit back to when MTV played music videos 24x7 and some of them were as scary as they were awesome...well, in most cases...

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 135 – Horror-Themed Music Videos of the 1980s

For this episode, with the help of previous co-host and Decades of Horror co-founder Thomas Mariani, we dropped a list of 15 horror-themed music videos for the grue-believers to vote on. The top 10 of that list, we discuss on this podcast. We also present some missed classics as provided by fans of the show and some congratulations on our 2nd anniversary. Thank you all for participating and listening.

 

The Top 10 Horror-Themed Music Videos

  • 10 Total Eclipse of the Heart by Bonnie Tyler (2/83)
  • 09 Killer Klowns from Outer Space by the Dickies (88)
  • 08 Bark at the Moon by Ozzy Osbourne (83)
  • 07 Dancing with Myself by Billy Idol (82)
  • 06 Who Made Who by AC/DC (86)
  • 05 Pet Sematary by Ramones (89)
  • 04 He's Back (Man Behind the Mask) by Alice Cooper (86)
  • 03 Dream Warriors by Dokken (87)
  • 02 Somebody's Watching Me by Rockwell (84)
  • 01 Thriller by Michael Jackson (12/83)

The Ones We Missed

  • Dirk Rogers: Torture by the Jackson 5, TV Dinners by ZZ Top
  • Jane Smith: Too Much Blood by The Rolling Stones
  • Brian Davis: Lost in the Shadows by Lou Gramm from the Lost Boys soundtrack
  • John Doe: Land of Confusion by Genesis
  • Sean Henry: Rob zombie's Dragula (Not the 80's but it still rocks!)
  • Luis Franco: That "Somebody's Watching Me" by Rockwell scared the shit out of me as a kid. Man,I miss the 80's. The idea of a mini-movie to go with a song is a lost art. MTV is just not MTV anymore. There was 3 crazy sci-fi themed videos whose songs had nothing to with the video; Billy Ocean's "Loverboy" KC & The Sunshine Band's "Give It Up", Duran Duran's "The Wildboys".Worth watching if you've never seen any of them.
  • Jerry Chandler: My Name is Norman Bates (1981) by Landscape; Pet Shop Boys: Heart (1988) if just for the sheer WTF of seeing Ian McKellen as a vampire lip syncing Pet Shop Boys; Metallica's One (1989) that's a whole different kind of horror.
Apr 9, 2018

"There's a legend 'round here. A killer buried, but not dead. A curse on Crystal Lake, a death curse: Jason Voorhees' curse." Our narrator (Walt "Crazy Ralph" Gorney) details the legend of Jason Voorhees. After being stuck at the bottom of Camp Crystal Lake in the last film, Jason is awoken by a young lady named Tina (Lar Park Lincoln) with psychic abilities. It's essentially Carrie vs. Jason... at least that's the intent. So is this a slashing entry in the franchise or is Pamela going to warn her son that "They're All Gonna Laugh at You?" Listen to find out!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 134 – Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood (1988)

Released in 1988, Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood came out near the end of the slasher genre's reign. It was a time when the MPAA became more critical of violence, causing the iconic kills the franchise was known for to be cut down severely. Director John Carl Buechler has been publically against how this turned out and we've only seen daily footage of the kills. Some of them were pretty gruesome, but alas not to be. Which makes some of the teen stuff all the more of a slog to get through.

Luckily, Doc Rotten, Christopher G. Moore and Thomas Mariani are here to take a closer look at Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood. All of them appreciate the final fight with Tina and the ambition of having a superpowered heroine fight Jason. Especially when that Jason is played for the first time by iconic stuntman Kane Hodder. Yet, there's plenty of issues to have with the editing and lack originality amongst the supporting cast. All this and more is discussed on Decades of Horror 1980s!

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Remember to vote in our two year anniversary poll about The Top 10 Best 80s Horror Music Videos!

Next Episode

Top 10 Best 80s Horror Themed Music Videos!

Apr 1, 2018

"The Third Dimension is TERROR" The tagline for Jaws 3-D works hard to convince its audience that the film is full of chills and thrills. Buried in the Eighties coming-at-you 3-D effects is a butchered story about the Brody boys all grown up and facing a great white shark of their own...at a famous sea park, no less. Dennis Quaid and Bess Armstrong lead the cast while first-time (and only-time) director Joe Alves lobs fish, arms, and shark teeth into the audience's lap. Seen in 3-D for this episode, Thomas, Doc, and Christopher are joined by Paul Cardullo to relish in the wacky 1983 cinematic fad.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Special Edition – Jaws 3-D (1983)

Jaws 3-D credits the legendary Richard Matheson as its screenwriter. The resulting film, however, does not feel like any other example of Matheson's work. He has gone on record stating his original script was "bedeviled by script-doctors."  Along with Quaid and Armstrong, the cast includes Leah Thompson, Simon MacCorkindale, and Louis Gosset Jr. while the film includes two sharks, the classic "Bruce" great white is nowhere to be seen. Yes, despite its flaws, the film is stupid fun in its original 3-D form and was a success in its time holding the record for highest gross for a 3-D film until Spy Kids 3-D: Game Over in 2003

Guest host Paul Cardullo joined Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore to catch Jaws 3-D presented in 3D at the FantasticRealm Film Series at The Carolina Theater in Durham, North Carolina while Thomas is confined to the standard "flat" edition. Thomas has yet to forgive Doc for this... In addition to Jaws 3-D, the Grue-Crew discuss the other four 3-D films featured during the series: Starchaser: The Legend of Orin (1985), Metalstorm: The Destruction of Jared-Syn (1983), Spacehunter: Adventures in the Forbidden Zone (1983), Treasure of the Four Crowns (1983). Doc Rotten also had the opportunity to interview Jim Carl, the director of the film series about 3D films, who reveals what The Carolina has in store for horror fans and Harry Guerro, from Exhumed Films, discusses 3-D films, his collection of cinema history, and some of the most rare 3-D films in existence.

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Remember to vote in our two year anniversary poll about The Top 10 Best 80s Horror Music Videos!

Next Episode

Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood (1988)

 

 

Mar 26, 2018

"Demons aren't gonna ring the doorbell!" Terry (Louis Tripp) gives his buddy Glen (Stephen Dorff) a lesson in demon etiquette. Yes, the cult favorite gateway horror film The Gate is much beloved by horror fans of the 1980s. So much so that it won our Patreon Decades of Horror Poll for the month of April! Yes, those who at least pay $1 a month got to choose this episode's topic of The Gate. So grab a shovel and your favorite subliminal death metal albums as we try to squash out some demons before they disrupt our 80s house party!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 133 – The Gate (1987)

The Gate is a relatively simple story. Young Glen and his older sister Al (Christa Denton) have the house to themselves for the weekend while their parents are out. So, while Al is having her friends over for a big party, Glen and his friend Terry are dealing with a mysterious geode they found in the sinkhole in the backyard. That geode manages to scrawl some incantation on a notepad that the kids read, unleashing demons upon their suburban house. Corpses from walls, dads with melting faces and moms-turned-to-dogs ensue from there.

To dissect this horror film for all ages, kids at heart Doc Rotten, Christopher G. Moore and Thomas Mariani exhume what's in the hole for The Gate. While all three originally saw this well out of the target demographic, this trio appreciates many things about this gateway horror film. Christopher loves the subtle bits of filmmaking craft. Doc learns to appreciate the believable child performances. Thomas wonders if Stephen Dorff peaked to early. It's just too metal a podcast to handle. Better drape yourself in a sheet and lip sync to some demonic songs before the little demons bite your leg!

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Remember to vote in our two year anniversary poll about The Top 10 Best 80s Horror Music Videos!

Next Episode

Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood (1988)
Plus, our Jaws 3D (1983) Bonus Episode!

Feb 26, 2018

"What is this? A homicide, or a bad B-movie?" Detective Ray Cameron (Tom Atkins) asks a trick question with an obvious answer. It's both. Then again, Night of the Creeps isn't really bad by any stretch. A sci-fi horror comedy for the ages, Night of the Creeps tells a simple story. One of college love, space slugs and zombies from the grave. Haven't we gotten enough of those, guys? Well, writer/director Fred Dekker at least manages to inject some B-movie fan charm in the proceedings in ways that anyone can get behind. The good news is Night of the Creeps is here on Decades of Horror 1980s. The bad news is... nothing, actually. Hooray!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 131 – Night of the Creeps (1986)

Night of the Creeps is the story of two college freshman who - in order to impress a fraternity - awaken a long frozen zombie and unleash chaos on a sleepy college town. Only depressed drunken Detective Cameron (Tom Atkins) can save the day while facing against demons of his past. While Night of the Creeps didn't make a big splash in theaters back in the summer of 1986, but managed to become a cult favorite on video. Not a surprise, given it's a mash of sci-fi aliens, axe murdering killers and Tom Atkins dishing out one liners. A rolicking good time that goes from space to 50s Americana to the nightmarish world of mid-80s college sex romp. It's got everything and the kitchen sink... Dick Miller! There's plenty of terror, romance and "thrill me"s to go around.

To dissect all the remaining gory bits of mayhem, Doc Rotten, Christopher G. Moore and Thomas Mariani are here and hopefully the space slugs won't get them first! Marvel as Christopher admits the influence Night of the Creeps had on one of his short films. Shudder as Doc realizes he hasn't seen the Director's Cut ending that crept up on him upon this watch. Ponder with Thomas at the possibility of a Tom Atkins detective story comeback movie. Plus, plenty of discussions about Fred Dekker's love of the genre, distinguishing between Kevin Pollack & David Paymer and making a drinking game out of all the director name tributes. Of course, we don't condone irresponsible drinking. You'll be dead within the first 20 minutes. Or at least screaming like banshees! Heh heh... "screaming like banshees."

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Next Episode

Beetlejuice (1988)

 

Feb 13, 2018

"You bastards. Why are you torturing me like this? WHY?!" Ash Williams (Bruce Campbell) ponders this aloud to the Deadites torturing them. Or maybe this question is more directed toward writer/director Sam Raimi hauling abuse at Bruce. Either way, The Evil Dead is definitely a punishing film, both toward its cast and the audience. Every time someone gets stabbed in the ankle or thrown into a bookshelf, both the actor and the audience feels it. Raimi started his illustrious career with this independent horror flick and it sure did shape where he'd go from here. There's gore, mayhem and low budget craziness abound. Might as well... JOIN US for it!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 130– The Evil Dead (1981)

The Evil Dead is sort of a black sheep in the franchise from a modern perspective. While Evil Dead II and Army of Darkness resemble more of what fans love about the franchise, The Evil Dead is a straight up horror film with little comedy to be found. Basically, the foundation from which the surreal comedy would spring forth.  That doesn't mean it's without merit. By no means. Sam Raimi even this early has so many dynamic camera moves that would later revolutionize blockbusters come Spider-Man. Helps that Bruce Campbell gets the crap beat out of him.

To talk all things The Evil Dead, Christopher G. Moore, Doc Rotten and Thomas Mariani are joined by Adam Thomas. Thomas discusses the evolution of the franchise. Christopher elaborates on how big an influence Sam Raimi had on his young filmmaker mind. Doc talks about how much it created the cabin in the woods genre. Adam winces while describing how brutal Campbell's painful moments are. Listen to find out all the details!

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Next Episode

Night of the Creeps (1986)

Jan 29, 2018

"It ate him... bit off his head... like a gingerbread man!" Dr. Crawford Tillinghast (Jeffrey Combs) is mystified by the powers of creatures coming from The Resonator in From Beyond. The second HP Lovecraft adaptation from writer/director Stuart Gordon didn't blow up cult audiences nearly as much as Re-Animator upon its initial release. Yet, this feature adaptation is far closer to Lovecraft than most other versions of his stories out there. It's a bizarre, disorienting and - above all - goopy take on the legendary sci-fi/horror author. One that's clamoring for a dissection right here on Decades of Horror 1980s!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 129 – From Beyond (1986)

From Beyond did not ignite much attention when originally released. Shocker that a sci-fi horror story of BDSM, goopy mutation and body unraveling wasn't a mainstream hit. Yet, one can't help but be charmed now by Dr. Katherine McMichaels (Barbara Crampton) trying to find out about this gap between humanity & alternative dimension aliens. Dr. Edward Pretorius (Ted Sorel) comes into our realm to show her. Thought the good doctor may not want the type of experimentation Dr. Pretorious is showing off. Hopefully, the pineal glands stay inside foreheads this time.

Here to describe all the bizarre horror of From Beyond is Doc Rotten, Thomas Mariani, and Christopher G. Moore. Thomas starts off by giving the apt adjective of "goopy." Doc has so much appreciation for the way Jeffrey Combs runs downstairs. Christopher takes a pause to mention how Lovecraftian this film is in comparison to Re-Animator and several other adaptations that followed. Unfortunately, Cthulhu doesn't show up to emphasize all this horror. Instead, there's plenty of goop to talk about! Just... make sure it doesn't get on your shoes.

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Next Episode

The Evil Dead (1981)

 

 

Jan 15, 2018

"You fool! You can not stop me! I am the ninja! No one, nothing can stop me!" Christie (Lucinda Dickey) is possessed by a killer ninja spirit and is out for blood. But how will this affect her career as a telephone poll worker and part-time aerobics instructor? Ugh, it makes you just wanna doing jumping jacks with weights, amirite? As one can clearly see, Ninja III: The Domination is a pretty silly movie. A blend of Flashdance, The Exorcist and every ninja movie out there. Then again, what else would you expect from Cannon?

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 128 – Ninja III: The Domination (1984)

After an elaborate fight sequence at a golf course, Ninja III: The Domination continues the train of insanity tenfold by having the killing machine Black Ninja (David Chung) die after a police shootout and struggle with Christie. Christie is haunted by bizarre dreams and swords on strings, which hurts her budding relationship with cop/creepy hairy stalker Billy (Jordan Bennet). Now under the possessive influence of the Black Ninja's spirit, Christie proceeds to murder each of the officers who participated in the shootout, baffling the cop who is literally sleeping with her on a nightly basis. The only person with any kind of effectiveness is the mysterious Yamada (Sho Kosugi), who arrives from Japan to get his vengeance on The Black Ninja who killed his master and left him with one eye. Ninjitsu and 80s hair ensue from here.

To break down all the insanity of Ninja III: The Domination, Doc Rotten, Christopher G. Moore and Thomas Mariani look into this genre mashup to find a method to the madness. There's much love for the silly manic energy that made Cannon such a unique film production company. All the bad ADR, excessive use of explosions and physics-defying martial arts are dissected here. Doc Rotten is delighted that genre favorite James Hong has a cameo. Christopher makes a strong argument for this being the most 80s film ever covered on the show. Thomas brings to light the serious struggle Ninja III: The Domination highlights of PTSF (Post Traumatic Stock Footage) Syndrome. All of this and more can be shoved into your eardrums like a shuriken to the face.

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Next Episode

From Beyond (1986)

 

Jan 1, 2018

"Did you say 'all aboard'? That's ridiculous! They can't be bored. I haven't even started." Ed (Howard Busgang) does his best Groucho impression to annoy the train staff... and everyone else. Ed is just one of many slasher archetypes that populate the Terror Train on New Year's Eve. Every college kid is wearing a different costume. The perfect claustrophobic area for a killer to hide. Can our heroine Alana (Jamie Lee Curtis) survive the night and get to the next stop? Take a listen to find out!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 127 – Terror Train (1980)

Terror Train was one of the early examples of the post-Halloween slasher boom of the 80s. Everyone was trying to take their crack at a contained low budget slasher. So, Canada figured "Why not have one take place on a train, eh?" Terror Train also manages to subvert a few things that others in the genre would stick to, mainly by not restricting the slasher to one costume. Our villain jumps from one outfit to the next in order to avoid detection. It's a real case of misdirection with our killer...one that mirrors the magic on display throughout.

Doc Rotten, Christopher G. Moore and Thomas Mariani are here to dissect all the magic of Terror Train. Or perhaps, lack thereof. There are a few moments of surprise here. Mainly with how many familiar faces of the 80s pop up. Keep your eyes peeled for The Wild Bunch's Ben Johnson, model Vanity and Ellis from Die Hard himself Hart Bochner. And of course, magician David Copperfield. Then again, Terror Train stops dead many times to give him a spotlight, so he's hard to miss. The trio also discuss the direction, the kills and of course it's place in the decade. Some are fans, others aren't. You'll just have to listen to find out who is who. The answers may shock you.

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Next Episode

Ninja III: The Domination (1984)

Dec 19, 2017

"I'll be good I swear... I'll never see a movie ever again." Eddie Beckner (Douglas Emerson) tries to wrap his young mind around the horror that is The Blob. Thirty years after the iconic Steve McQueen vehicle became one of the definitive 1950s drive-in classics of the sci-fi/horror genre, director/writer Chuck Russell - along with his Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors co-writer Frank Darabont - took a stab at remaking it. While not a revered at the time, the remake of The Blob has gained some minor recognition as one of the better horror remakes out there. But does this digest well with the Decades of Horror 1980s crew or are they going to put that reputation on ice? Find out as they walk through a winter wonderland free of snow.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 126 – The Blob (1988)

The Blob decided to up the ante on one major aspect of the original film. 30 years after taboos on violence were a bit more lenient, Chuck Russell decided to show off as much gore and horror as possible with the concept. Right from when Paul (Donovan Leitch Jr) is consumed, The Blob shows that it is not afraid to kill at any moment. And brutally so. Perhaps this is why it failed as much as it did upon initial release.

Yet, there's plenty to appreciate now as each of the hosts - Doc Rotten, Christopher G. Moore, and Thomas Mariani - take their own look back. Thomas marvels at the evolution of the look of the titular Blob from a jelly mold in the original to cancerous tumor here. Doc Rotten is surprised by just how many popular character actors show up. Christopher G. Moore notices all the nuances of set-up and pay-off written in by Frank Darabont. To hear even more details, take a listen! Plus, you'll find out what a "bubblegum tongue" is. Or not. We're still not sure, to be honest.

Dec 6, 2017

"Great party, isn't it?" The ghosts are all calling this party a big success. Congrats to Jack Torrance (Jack Nicholson) for being pull it off. Especially with his wife Wendy (Shelley Duvall) and son Danny (Danny Lloyd) constantly nagging him about "please don't kill us." Pfft. Family, am I right? The Shining is a pretty big example of Stephen King adaptations, one commonly derided for not being too close to the book. Did Stanley Kubrick's lack of faithfulness stop it from being covered on the show? You're damn right it didn't!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 125 – The Shining (1980)

Based on the massive best seller from Stephen King, The Shining isn't too faithful to its source material. While the book heavily relies on knowing the madness behind Jack Torrance, Stanley Kubrick's film is more external. It shows the madness for what it is. Presenting the irrational haunts in a rational fashion. This dichotomy is what creates the conflicts of the Torrance family as they fall apart. The Shining isn't subtle, but the scares are just as big as Nicholson's wails of "DANNY!" Plus, Kubrick helped revolutionized the steadicam, creating smooth movements that revolutionized what cinema could be.

To celebrate all of this, Thomas, Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore attend the Overlook Hotel's July 4th Ball in the middle of winter. Now, some people on this crew admit they weren't huge fans of Kubrick's vision initially. Yet, it seems like there's a few converts to The Shining here. There's praise all around for Kubrick's direction, Nicholson's performance and the terrifying ghosts. However, there's also some crucial questions being asked. Could Chevy Chase have made a good Jack Torrance? Does Jack have "The Shine" like Danny? Wasn't Scatman Crothers also Hong Kong Phooey? All these and more are answered, folks!

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We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

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The Blob (1988)

Nov 21, 2017

"Who the hell is going to believe a ritual sacrificial murder in 1982?!" Sgt Powell (Richard Roundtree) asking the question on everyone's mind. Yet - in a film with a flying lizard creature, cop drama and an interpersonal struggle of an ex-junkie - a ritual sacrifice is the bottom barrel in the list of weird crap in Q The Winged Serpent. Our Patreon picked episode! Do we owe our friends a skyscraper roof sunbathing session? Or are we hoping they get covered in poop? Listen to find out!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 124 – Q The Winged Serpent (1982)

Q The Winged Serpent is a hodgepodge of so many film tropes. There's the giant flying monster eating people, which is one we're all more than familiar with. Leading to a buddy cop drama where Sgt. Powell and his partner Detective Sheppard (David Carradine) investigate the string of ritual sacrificial murders in the wake of this creature. Meanwhile, an ex-junkie turned thief (Michael Moriarty) becomes seduced by the power of the titular bird and holds leverage over the city while arguing with his girlfriend (Candy Clark). Needless to say, it's all over the place.

To decipher all the plots, Christopher G. Moore, Thomas Mariani and Doc Rotten sit down to discuss Q The Winged Serpent in detail. Christopher is baffled by Michael Moriarty's crazed performance. Thomas praises the barrage of influences that crafted a pretty unique package. Doc really wants to know what happened to all the poop. Regardless, they're all very happy that the folks at Patreon gave them an interesting film to discuss. After all, how many monster flicks have improvised jazz piano? Exactly!

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We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

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The Shining (1980)

Nov 6, 2017

"You ungodly warlock! Because of you this hotel and this town will be cursed forever!" An angry mob storms the hotel of Schweick (Antoine Saint-John), a warlock trying to keep the 7th doorway to hell at bay. Or whatever the hell is happening in this opening as he's covered in queso. The Beyond - like many a Lucio Fulci film - takes liberties with logic and forward momentum in story. There's a lot more emphasis on the horror of the images rather than a traditional narrative structure. It's an acquired taste. But who amongst the Decades of Horror 1980s crew acquired this taste? Listen to find out!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 123 – The Beyond (1981)

The Beyond is the middle chapter in Fulci's Gates of Hell trilogy, following Gates of Hell (or City of the Living Dead) and just before The House By The Cemetery. While a loose trilogy, each has a Giallo sensibility that combines bright gore with nonsensical narratives. Outside of the basic premise of a young lady Liza (Catriona MacColl) inheriting a hotel that has a gateway to Hell, The Beyond is mainly an excuse for the madness to unfold. Tarantulas bite a guy's face. A woman's face melts after being covered in acid in front of her daughter. Zombies attack for no real discernable reason.

So, does this sit well with the Decades of Horror crew? Well, Doc Rotten is a tried and true Fulci fan, though he admits that the Italian legend frustrated him initially. Christopher G. Moore and Thomas Mariani admit they aren't as up on their Italian horror. Christopher has some trouble with the dream logic and lack of consistency in the characters. Thomas can see that, but revels in the unintentional hilarity at play. It's a brazen frank discussion about auteur theory, gore and the grammatical errors of "Do Not Entry." Make sure to go Beyond the extra mile and listen to it all!

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We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

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Our Patreon Poll Winner: Q The Winged Serpent (1982)

Oct 30, 2017

"You are weird. Thank God you're weird. The last one was so normal, it was disgusting." Elizabeth Solley (Jamie Lee Curtis) loves herself some weirdos. Including the weirdest man of all: Tom Atkins without a mustache! Halloween is getting pretty foggy for Decades of Horror 1980s as they one of the first horror films of the decade: John Carpenter's The Fog. Hopefully, our intrepid hosts can avoid being sucked in the misty moors of Antonio Bay in time for the 100th-anniversary celebration. Or, the very least, with enough time to catch Stevie Wayne's (Adrienne Barbeau) late-night broadcast. Join us as the Halloween Haunts season ends!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 122 – The Fog (1980)

The Fog is pretty interesting on a career path level for Carpenter. Post the major success of Halloween, but before he would rule the 1980s with a varying amount of genre work. The Fog sticks out a bit more. A ghost story without much gore, inst of ad using atmosphere to build up the tension rather than excessive violence that would color the slasher craze later that very year. It's an ethereal spooky example of how to build up the environment of Antonio Bay, allowing for silhouettes of the monsters to play horrific tricks on our eyes and creep us out just when it's too late.

To discuss everything The Fog, Christopher G. Moore, Doc Rotten and Thomas Mariani discuss everything in the misty moors that remain unseen. They debate the effectiveness of some of these characters, how much this is a Carpenter movie and ask where the ghost of Atkins' moustache really is. Plus, they wonder just how American Christopher Lee could possibly be. It's a spooky Halloween edition you won't want to miss! Stay in and tune the radio from Stevie Wayne's channel to hear it all!

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We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Also, don't forget our Patreon Poll where people who contribute as low as $1 a month can pick the second episode of Decades of Horror 1980s! Voting ends November 5th.

Next Episode

The Beyond (1981)

Oct 23, 2017

"Science is neat, but I'm afraid it's not very forgiving." Mr. Clarke (Randall P. Havens) explains how harsh a mistress science can be to our young heroes. Luckily, our young boys can take on pretty much everything, including a horrific nightmare creature from a parallel dimension. All of it is up for grabs as we conclude our look at Stranger Things Season 1. Time to grab your Eggo waffles and settle in for a dark and stormy October night!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 121 – Stranger Things Season 1 Part 2 (2016)

When we last left our young heroes, Stranger Things were really starting to build. Mike (Finn Wolfhard), Dustin (Gaten Matarazzo) and Lucas (Cale McLaughlin) try to find the gate where their friend Will (Noah Schnapp) was taken into. Yet, their friendship is already being strained by the presence of Eleven (Millie Bobby Brown), both for her supernatural powers and her closeness to Mike. Meanwhile, Nancy (Natalia Dyer) and Will's brother Jonathan (Charlie Heaton) are on the hunt for the Demogorgon. Parallel to this, Joyce (Winona Ryder) and Sheriff Hopper (David Harbour) are on investigating the Hawkins National Laboratory and their shady operation. It'll all come to ahead as the reasoning behind these Stranger Things collide.

To discuss these Stranger Things, Doc Rotten, Christopher G. Moore and Thomas Mariani are traveling into The Upside Down. There's a bit of descent as to whether or not this is as strong as the first half of the season. Yet, there's unanimous agreement about many things. The kids are all still enjoyable and endearing. Our look into The Upside Down is still creepy and atmospheric. Matthew Modine goes out like a punk. There's also the question of what the upcoming new season will hold and where we could go from here. All this and more are going to stuff your earholes to the point where you may get a nosebleed. Get this cotton balls ready!

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We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

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The Fog (1980)... Next Week!

 

Oct 18, 2017

"Long Live The New Flesh!" Max Renn (James Woods) makes his declaration of rebellion against Videodrome, the very thing he's become so attached to. But is he really rebelling against the system or merely another cog in the machine? It's a question people often ask themselves every day with no easy answers. Luckily, those answers can come from the most unlikely of places. One such place is Decades of Horror 1980s! Hop into your connected device and hear just how depressing the world we live in really is. Hooray!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 120 - Videodrome (1983)

Videodrome didn't make much of a blip for Canadian writer/director David Cronenberg's career. Fresh off the heals of the cult success of The Brood and Scanners yet just before the mainstream explosion of The Dead Zone and The FlyVideodrome quietly came in and out of theaters in 1983. The heavy horror sci-fi concept of a TV smut peddler hallucinating technology nightmares didn't seem to attract audiences at the time. Yet with time, this audacious subversion of narrative, time and culture became a cult hit that resonates even more in the ages long since Betamax was a viable platform.

Well, at least for some. This episode features a pretty clear divide for who can stand Cronenberg's Videodrome. But who could be the dissenter in the crowd? Did Doc Rotten appreciate the cynical bitter pills which needed swallowing? Can Christopher G. Moore tolerate the gross-out body horror on display? Will Thomas Mariani have issues with Debbie Harry not being her iconic Blondie self? Listen and find out for yourselves!

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We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Next Episode

Stranger Things Season 1 Part 2 (2016)… Next Week!

Oct 11, 2017

"Mornings are for coffee and contemplation." Jim Hopper (David Harbour) sets the record straight on what cops do in Hawkins Indiana. After all, Hawkins is a quiet small town where not much happens. Kids ride their bikes. Adults do their jobs. Nothing tends to happen. Well, at least until we see that Stranger Things are afoot. Much like they are on this podcast. Yup, we're not covering a film. Or even something from the 80s. What type of upside down world is this?! The October haunts season surprises us all!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 119 – Stranger Things Season 1 Part 1 (2016)

Rules were meant to be broken as Decades of Horror 1980s covers the first four episodes of the first season of Stranger Things in prep for season 2 in a few short weeks! While from our modern era, Stranger Things is definitely steeped in 80s culture. We follow around a bunch of suburban boys who ride their bikes and find mysterious supernatural scenarios in their small town. Influences from talents like Steven Spielberg, John Carpenter, and Stephen King are all throughout this Netflix hit. It's a must-see for anyone who would listen. So, why not give these first four episodes a true spotlight on a show dedicated to the era it loves so?

To talk all of these Stranger Things are Doc, Christopher, and Thomas. The three discuss the cultural phenomenon of the show and how it is more than just the popular kid in class with slicked-back hair. Stranger Things has the right mix of genre thrills, tropes subversions and emotional gravity to make it worthy of the fascination. Our trio looks at all the characters, major early events, and references that made Stranger Things such a hit. Look forward to a follow up on the last four episodes of the season in two weeks!

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We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Next Episode

Videodrome (1983)... Next Week!

Oct 3, 2017

"Jesus wept." Frank/Larry Cotton (Andrew Robinson) lets his face stretch out in ecstasy as the cenobites finally take him. The lines between lust and death are thin in Hellraiser, but Decades of Horror 1980s has much to say on the subject. Tune in as we try to solve the Lament Configuration to get these S&M demons out of here. Or is that a Rubix cube? We can't even tell the difference! Let the weekly October haunts season of the show begin!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 118 – Hellraiser (1987)

Hellraiser is a unique beast in the genre for the 80s. A rare unflinching example of raw madness and beauty from the author behind the source material. Clive Barker may have been inexperienced, but boy did he know who to work with. With some kinky visuals and massive world building on a small budget, Hellraiser managed to create a universe worth exploring. It's a shame they explored it in the way they did in the sequels. Still, the first film is a true masterwork. Gorgeous effects, engaging character perspectives and one of the iconic horror villains of all time in Pin... er, I mean "Lead Cenobite."

To discuss all of this, Thomas Mariani and Christopher G. Moore welcome back Doc Rotten into the regular recording sphere to start off the weekly October haunts for 2017! 30 years after it premiered, Hellraiser still dazzles. The three discuss the unique antagonist perspective, the use of the Cenobites and the sexaul lines between pain and pleasure. It's a doozy of a discussion that'll have you spinning from the chains on the ceiling. You may not even want to get down from there!

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We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Next Episode

Stranger Things Season 1 Part 1... Next Week!

Sep 28, 2017

"Hi, I'm Chucky. Wanna Play?" Chucky (Brad Dourif) - a doll possessed by the spirit of serial killer Charles Lee Ray - is one angry little dude. Stuck in a plastic body trying to find a flesh one to return to, Chucky has to dupe a young boy named Andy (Alex Vincent) into transporting him around to extract his revenge. Yet, it's all simply treated as Child's Play. But how playful will the Grue Crew be about this particular toy phenomenon? You'll just have to see how nice our boys play.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 117 – Child's Play (1988)

Chucky is the last of the iconic slashers from the 80s era. Coming off the heels of Freddy Kruger and Jason Voorhees, Chucky had more of a way with words like the former rather than the latter. A foul-mouthed doll that had the voice of a slimier Jack Nicholson impersonator. He may be little, but did he pack a punch. Child's Play was a major success, playing on the modern Cabbage Patch Kids and My Buddy doll crazes of the age with a sinister edge. Child's Play started one of the stranger horror franchises ever, but we wouldn't have the funnier antics that involve Tiffany without this one to set the groundwork.

To discuss all of this, Thomas Mariani brought along his own Goody Guy Doll, Chris...topher G. Moore! The two discuss the context of the late 80s boom in child advertising and how it impacts the world of the Child's Play universe. Despite the seedy underpinnings, the two revel in the sweetness of the adorable Vincent and his struggling single mom Hicks. The two build a solid base that Chucky try to chip away at with his Good Guy hammer. Plus, there are plenty of comparisons to talking dolls old & new, the direction of the Child's Play franchise and whether or not the special effects hold up that well. There's plenty to discuss with this small package, but just you wait until that toy bursts out of its box.

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We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Next Episode

Hellraiser (1987)

Sep 13, 2017

"It's finger-lickin' good!" Severen (Bill Paxton) gives an accurate description of how human blood tastes. Or so we assume. After being tossed to the side upon it's initial release, Near Dark is basically a western with a horror sheen. Caleb Cotton (Adrian Pasdar) is a modern hombre who gets mixed up with a group of marauders with a thirst for blood. The Grue Crew talk about all this gem live from DragonCon with a very special guest: C. Robert Cargill, writer of SinisterDoctor Strange and the recently released book Sea of RustNow *that* sounds finger lickin' good to us!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 116 – Near Dark (1987)

Near Dark is notable on a lot of levels. The directorial debut of future Academy Award winning director Kathryn Bigelow (Point BreakThe Hurt Locker) was a curious debut. Near Dark has it all. Paxton chewing up scenery. Vampires wandering around in a mobile home. Some kick ass fire stunts. This western aesthetic creates a vast endless desert for our heroes to wander around, looking for blood to feed on as they avoid exploding in the wake of the sun. The moment your hear those spurs coming closer, it's not a gun you have to worry about. It's the fangs that'll tear out your throat.

To talk Near Dark, Thomas and Christopher are not only reunited with Doc Rotten and frequent Grue Crew co-host Bill Mulligan. No, for this live episode recorded at DragonCon, our boys are joined by C. Robert Cargill. You may have known him as film critic "Massawyrm" from Ain't It Cool News, screenwriter of films like Sinister Doctor Strange or for his books like the recently released Sea of Rust. These five talk this gem of a vampire film in front of a live audience, asking the big questions. Is this peak Paxton? How much of this genre fare crept into Kathryn Bigelow's Oscar material? Did this need a sax scene to compete with Lost Boys that same year? All these questions and more are answered in this episode!

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We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Next Episode

Child's Play (1988)

Aug 30, 2017

"Sometimes, dead is better." Jud (Fred Gwyne) tries to warn Louis (Dale Midkiff) of the dangers of bringing back what has been buried. Will Louis heed these warnings? Can he recover from a major blow to his family? Or will he succumb to the temptations of the Pet Sematary? Take a trip down the dirt road (as pronounced RA-ODD like Jud would) and find out for yourself!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 115 – Pet Sematary (1989)

Pet Sematary is a noteworthy Stephen King adaptation. It was the first adaptation he had creative control over (not including Maximum Overdrive, which no one had control over). He demanded that director Mary Lambert and her crew stick close to his script. King was very protective of his very emotional story of family turmoil, in which Louis and Rachel Creed (Denise Crosby) move their kids Ellie (Beau and Blaze Berdahl) and Gage (Miko Hughes) to the country. They're trying to raise their children and cat named Church. Unfortunately, a few members of that family die, leading Louis to attempt to bring them back via... a new burial.

Joining Thomas and Christopher to talk about dead kids and animals are Dave Dreher and Adam Thomas! Half have read Stephen King's novel, the other half hasn't. So, one side can help the other with answers. Answers to questions like: How much better would Bruce Campbell be than Dale Midkiff in the role of Louis? How much of Mike Hughes' performance is made in editing? Does Church actually eat the entire Thanksgiving feast for cats? All these answers and more rise out of the Pet Sematary! Just don't answer the door when the zombie questions knock at it. Unless you're into having sex with them. But we ain't judging.

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We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

If you’re in the Atlanta area during Labor Day Weekend (Sept 1-4), make sure to visit us at Dragon Con Horror Track!

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Next Episode

Near Dark (1987) Recorded At Dragon Con!

Aug 14, 2017

"Choke on 'em. CHOKE ON 'EM!" Rhodes (Joseph Pilato) tells those ghouls exactly what they can do with his own guts. It's a terrifying example of zombie carnage. One that still stands as a special effects achievement for Tom Savini. Still, does that mean Day of the Dead holds a candle to what George A. Romero started in Night or Dawn? Some would say no. Others say it ratchets things up to the next level. Where does this crew stand? Tune in to find out!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 114 – Day of the Dead (1985)

Day of the Dead seems like the redheaded stepchild of the original Living Dead trilogy. Not as groundbreaking as Night and not as incredibly successful as DawnDay is a unique beast. We see the development of the zombie apocalypse from initial phases to near extinction with this trilogy. Now, humanity is stuck underground and tensions are high. Food is running low, ammunition is being stock piled and there are factions being established. All the while, scientific progress is attempting to flourish as the scientist works with Bub (Sherman Howard), a zombie who shows signs of remembering his past. Even after better appraisal following lesser Romero zombie efforts like Diary or SurvivalDay just seems to get lost in the shuffle.

Thomas enlists a few people to help find this card stuck in the deck. Santos Ellin Jr is amongst that crowd, praising Day of the Dead as the best of the Living Dead series. He loves the apocalyptic tone and brutal kills. Christopher G. Moore returns to the show and is less than impressed with the annoying characters and cheap look. Dragon*Con guru Derek Tatum comes on the show to give Day its... well, day in court. Thomas rounds out the cast by agreeing the film deserves more praise, as the best aspects surf over the problems without much issue. Mainly Bub as one of the stand out zombie characters of all time. Better than any of the zombies in Diary at any rate.

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

If you're in the Atlanta area during Labor Day Weekend (Sept 1-4), make sure to visit us at Dragon*Con Horror Track!

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Next Episode

Pet Semetary (1989)

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