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Now displaying: Category: Monster Movie Podcast
Aug 2, 2017

"Uh oh, Brian. Now you're REALLY losing your mind." The mysterious creature Alymer (John Zacherle) is giving Brian (Rick Hearst) a pretty hard time. Acting like a real parasite on the back, you could say. Thus, the premise of Brain Damage comes to life. Just your average 80s "Say No To Drugs" special. You got it all; the young relatable protagonist, a drug pushing worm monster, and hallucinations that combine every drug imaginable. Frank Henenlotter's anti-drug masterpiece has gone underappreciated for nearly 30 years. But on Decades of Horror, we don't forget. We never forget.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 113 - Brain Damage (1988)

Brain Damage is one weird movie. Then again, a low budget flick from Frank Henenlotter (Frankenhooker, Basket Case) is bound t. The story of a young man getting addicted to drugs via a brain sucking parasite is pretty messed up. Especially when you become a vehicle to murder. Brain Damage has everything. Brains being sucked out of heads. Bizarro acting. An oral sex scene that turns into A Nightmare on Elm Street. It's a startling combination of Little Shop of Horrors and Reefer Madness that has to be seen to be believed.

Here to see and believe are Thomas Mariani and his guests Santos Ellin Jr and... his own pride and joy Mariana?! Yes, The Black Saint has brought his spawn to talk Brain Damage. Both go over their family bonding over a brain sucking slug. Thomas, on the other hand, is new to this one. He has plenty to say about the Reagan era drug film subversions and Zacherle's underrated voice acting. They're all so excited, they just need a drop of Almyer's juice. Just one to tide us over, man!

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Next Episode

Day of the Dead (1985)

 

Jul 17, 2017

"I'd buy that for a dollar!" Despite 30 years of time passing, Robocop has satire that's pretty on point. The innocuous entertainment. Tonally disproportionate news items. Commercials that hawk consumer products that do nothing for their customers. All of it speaks to the world we currently live in. Luckily, Paul Verhoeven manages to slip in some ultra violence, amazing special effects and strong character work in between to make us a bit less depressed. Robocop may not be a horror film, but it speaks to many of the modern horrors we face today. Plus, that weird sewage mutant monster scene.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 112 – Robocop (1987)

Our titular Robocop is Alex Murphy (Peter Weller), a good cop stuck in the decaying streets of Detroit. He loves his family and is a cop of extreme dutiful spirit. Even after the police force becomes controlled by the corporation Omni Consumer Products, Murphy still goes by the book to help people. Even at the cost of his life at the hands of Clarence Boddecker (Kurtwood Smith). Little does Murphy know that Clarence also works for OCP's Dick Jones (Ronny Cox), a man who lives up to his name. Trying to spearhead his initiative on ED-209, a faulty robot defense system that he wants to ship out for the millions it will bring. Luckily, Murphy is reborn as a cyborg cop thanks to young OCP executive Bob Morton. Yet, our heroic cop is haunted by dreams of his former life and struggles to rekindle his humanity with the help a young cop he met on his death day Anne Lewis (Nancy Allen).

To discuss Robocop, Thomas Mariani and Christopher G. Moore are in need of help. Doc Rotten is out and Adam Thomas & Mike Imboden are in to pick up the slack. The four discuss what makes this work for a horror show like ours. Sure, there's plenty of science fiction and action. But the gore and psychologically disturbing nature of Murphy is pretty terrifying in general. They all praise the performances of this incredible cast, namely Peter Weller in that suit. There's even a fair amount of talk about the Robocop franchise... and how it shouldn't have been a franchise. The sequels, cartoons, TV shows and remake couldn't capture an ounce of what made Robocop what it was. A horrific yet incredibly smart genre exercise.

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Next Episode

Brain Damage (1988)

 

Jul 3, 2017

"Every nightmare has a beginning... This one never ends." The dream logic of Dressed to Kill is ever present. Director Brian De Palma isn't nearly as interested in a coherent story as he is the visuals. So many elaborate split diopter shots. More than a few split screens. That weird soft focus that was a thing in the 1970s. But none of this answers the question. Is Dressed to Kill more than just a technical exercise? Tune in to find out!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 111 – Dressed to Kill (1980)

Dressed to Kill has a pretty familiar story. Stop me if you've heard this one before. Kate Miller (Angie Dickinson) is distant from her partner. While in an enclosed space, she is killed by a person dressed as a woman very early in the movie. Thus, our protagonist is gone and the rest of the film follows the investigation into her death. Yup, that's pretty much the structure of Psycho. Shocking that De Palma would ape Alfred Hitchcock, I know. Yet, there are a few details that are different. Our protagonist isn't committing a crime, but cheating on her distant husband. That enclosed space is an elevator, not a shower. And that killer is explicitly transsexual, but who could be the one Dressed to Kill? How can our new protagonist (Nancy Allen) live with seeing that murder? Is she going pork Kate's teenage son Pete (Keith Gordon)? And what does the other most prominent character Dr. Elliott (Michael Caine) have to do with this?

To uncover the mystery, Doc Rotten, Christopher G. Moore and Thomas Mariani debate the effectiveness of Dressed to Kill. Christopher admires the style over substance that made De Palma famous. Doc is conflicted about the film as a whole once Dickinson exits. Thomas just wants to know how the hell Dennis Franz lost all that hair! The trio bicker, but definitely agree that De Palma shoots Dressed to Kill with his usual expert visual eye. One that gives us plenty to examine... even if the story doesn't really try. Nor does Nancy Allen.

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Next Episode

Robocop (1987)

Jun 20, 2017

"Whoa, whoa. You better watch what you say about my car. She's real sensitive." Arnie Cunningham (Keith Gordon) is rather protective of his 1957 Plymouth Fury named Christine. He worked hard to restore it, pretty much rebuilding it from the ground up. Arnie doesn't appreciate when people mince words in front of her. Or worse, lay an unprovoked finger on her person. Then again, Arnie doesn't need to do a thing. Christine speaks for herself. And her words are deadly.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 110 – Christine (1983)

After a prologue set in 1957 showing the deadly origins of Christine, we flash forward to our main action set in 1978. Arnie is a stock nerd archetype, to the point of cramping the new found coolness of his best friend Dennis (John Stockwell). He's on the football team while Arnie is playing Scrabble with his parents. After getting beaten up by the school bullies, Arnie finally catches a break when he finds Christine. While initially a junkpile, Arnie manages to restore this junked up car to its former glory. Mainly thanks to the generosity of junk yard owner Will Darnell (Robert Prosky). As Arnie spends more time restoring his new car, he slowly becomes more confident and cool. He even manages to bag the most popular girl in school Leigh (Alexandra Paul). But that confidence grows into aggressiveness, showing that the car might have an influence over Arnie. The charm works both ways however, as the now sentient Christine is hell bent on destroying the bullies that came between her and her man.

Doc Rotten, Christopher G. Moore and Thomas Mariani have plenty to weigh on with this early Stephen King adaptation. While not the most popular film from director John Carpenter, the three praise his ability to turn a job-for-hire into an efficient horror film. There's praise for the soundtrack selection that gives the car a personality. A few varying opinions on whether or not Keith Gordon's transformation feels earned. Even a mutual distaste for the rather flat performance by Alexandra Paul. There are also plenty of burning questions about Christine. Does serve as a prequel to Pixar's Cars? How did Carpenter's team pull off those car effects shots? Would a modern day Arnie be explicitly sexually attracted to his car? All of these are answered to the best of these three's knowledge this episode!

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Jun 7, 2017

"Welcome to Fright Night. For Real!" Jerry Dandridge (Chris Sarandon) welcomes a few guests into his home. Shame they welcomed him into their own. Fright Night is one of the more beloved examples of vampire films in the 1980s. Respecting the older examples while adding more than a few hallmarks that entered vampire lexicon in the years that followed. Fright Night was an auspicious debut for director/writer Tom Holland. How does this film-of-its-era hold up to modern scrutiny? There's only one way to find out... via your ear-holes!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 109 – Fright Night (1985)

Fright Night has a love for the classics. Then again, that's a given with it's lead Charley Brewster (William Ragsdale) being such a fan of old school horror. He loves watching Peter Vincent (Roddy McDowall) hosting the nighly edition of Fright Night. To the point of ignoring his girlfriend Amy's (Amanda Bearse) advances. However, it may seem like Charley's love for the macabre may be getting the best of him when he sees his new neight Jerry feasting on young flesh. The entire neighborhood doesn't believe him, except for his clingy overexcited friend Evil Ed (Stephen Geoffreys). Things become abundantly more clear as Peter Vincent becomes involved, realizing that Jerry doesn't even have a reflection! What a Fright Night indeed.

Joining Doc Rotten, Christopher and Thomas this time is Gruesome Magazine writer Joey Fittos, who puts Fright Night in his own top 10 films of all time. The four discuss the various aspects that keep Fright Night relevant to this day. The effects work lives up to modern scrutiny. Any moment of dated 80s cheese works to the thematics at play. Even the subtextual queer elements are up for grabs, given this is a story of people trying to belong. It's a packed discussion that shows just how varied and wonderful Fright Night truly is as a film! After all, no matter how annoying Evil Ed may get, he still thinks Brewster is "so cool!"

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

 

May 23, 2017

"See you in the movies!" Eric Binford (Dennis Christopher) loves movies. The classic black and white films of old. Gangsters. Dashing cowboys. Universal Monsters. All are welcome in his escapist fantasies of the theater or his own memorability filled room to hide from reality. Sound a bit familiar? Yes, the protagonist of Fade to Black is a bit too close to home in certain ways to the average movie buff. But there's one line of his we haven't crossed yet... hopefully: Murder! But at least he has some cosplay appropriate attire to do it in.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 108 – Fade to Black (1980)

Fade to Black is a rather obscure footnote in horror film history. Released in 1980 to little fanfare, Fade to Black hasn't had a home video release since 1999, due to the endless licenses that would have to be approved. Showing clips from Creature from the Black LagoonWhite Heat and The Public Enemy, the legalities are pretty tied up. Not to mention some of the likenesses involved, like Marilyn Monroe look-alike Marilyn O'Conner (Linda Kerridge). She's the object of Eric's desires. The only non-movie related thought that gets him through being harassed by his Aunt Stella (Eve Brent), his boss Marty Berger (Norman Burton) and his beefy co-worker Richie (a fresh-faced Mickey Rourke). Eric is on edge and ready to snap at any moment. Luckily, he has plenty of elaborate costumes to show off his metaphorical Fade to Black.

Doc Rotten, Thomas Mariani and Christopher G. Moore managed to see this diamond in the rough thanks to Amazon Prime. While Doc enjoyed revisiting it, Thomas and Christopher viewed it for the first time. One found Fade to Black to be a tragically fascinating gem ahead of its time in predicting the type of obsession culture of the Internet age. One... wasn't as impressed. The results may shock you. The trio discusses the film references, Dennis Christopher's tragic performance, and that weird cop subplot. Yeah, they're not even sure why it's there. Still, Fade to Black is one to check out... while you still can!

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

May 9, 2017

"Obey me! Or I will return you to the diseased state I found you in... and then I will slay BOTH of you!" Radu Molasar (Michael Carter) warns Dr. Theodore Cuza (Ian McKellan) not to question his judgement. Or else! Why he's suggesting he's going to return him to his earlier state and then kill him instead of just doing the latter is up for debate. One of many things that will make you scratch your head in The Keep. With a troubled production and relative obscurity, The Keep isn't that fondly looked upon. In fact, there's only one true fan of The Keep... and he's on this podcast.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 106 – Poltergeist (1982)

The Keep came out in 1983 to little fanfare. It had a troubled production. This included excessive reshoots, the lead special effects designer dying and director/writer Michael Mann's vision being compromised from a three and a half hour cut to just ninety six minutes. The results are a rather convoluted mess of storylines. At the centered are a group of Nazis (lead by Jürgen Prochnow) overtaking a citadel in Romania known as The Keep. These Nazis take a Jewish historian (McKellan) out of a concentration camp to decipher ancient writings, who discovers a golem-like creature the citadel is keeping at bay. Meanwhile, some dude named Glaeken (Scott Glenn) has laser eyes and wants to destroy the golem... because. That's about as much plot as can be described for The Keep. The choppy editing and awful VHS quality transfer for the only copy available on streaming platforms (and not on DVD or Blu-Ray) can hardly be determined.

So in order to make any sense out of The Keep, Doc Rotten, Christopher G. Moore and Thomas Mariani seek the guidance of Santos Ellin Jr. He's been a fan of Michael Mann's film since he first saw it in a not-so-crowded theater. He describes the mastery of Mann's direction, the unique production design and just how awesome that Tangerine Dream score was. At least, in the original form, since it's not available on the crappy transfer due to music rights. Everyone else isn't quite as impressed. Thomas appreciates the vision, but thinks the only version that's available doesn't do it justice. Christopher thinks it should be imprisoned for all time in a citadel all its own. Doc is just flat out confused. It's an elaborate discussion that makes us wonder about what could have been. Is The Keep a keeper or should it be locked away? Listen to find out for sure!

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Apr 25, 2017

"They're Here." Carol Anne Freeling (Heather O'Rourke) becomes an iconic character in the history of horror. Poltergeist sent shockwaves through audiences when it premiered 35 years ago. Taking the traditional suburban landscape and sending ghosts through it. Giving a whole generation fears of trees, TV sets and clowns. The nightmare fuel is palpable to this day, as Poltergeist still has the type of imagery that resonates. Now, Poltergeist is getting the Decades of Horror treatment, as the show celebrates its one-year anniversary with another Tobe Hooper film. Well... whether or not it's that is up for debate.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 106 – Poltergeist (1982)

Poltergeist has a pretty solid pedigree. Written and produced by Steven Spielberg, the 1982 ghost story was made concurrently with Spielberg's directorial effort E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial. To the point where Drew Barrymore got her role in the latter by auditioning for the former. Then again, who could possibly see Poltergeist without Heather O'Rourke as the adorable Carol Anne? Or Craig T. Nelson and Jobeth Williams as the endearing heads of The Freeling family? The entire cast makes for an incredibly convincing family unit, one whose struggles with the paranormal are made all the more terrifying by finding them investing. Even the paranormal investigative crew manages to have emotional resonance. Beatrice Straight grounds the investigation with a quiet sense of wonder and Zelda Rubinstein gives an authentic sense of authority that proves "size matters not."

This Poltergeist episode also means the first year anniversary for Decades of Horror 1980s! A year ago, Doc Rotten, Christopher G. Moore and Thomas Mariani covered Tobe Hooper's Texas Chainsaw Massacre II. Now, they're debating if Mr. Hooper even had anything to do with this one! There's definitely plenty of Spielbergian touches, but Hooper occasionally peeks his head in for the more technical aspects of the haunts. Yet, Hooper doesn't seem as capable of capturing the afterlife's sense of wonder as Spielberg. Or the tight nit grounded family dynamic. Or the suburban solidarity that gets torn apart by the titular spectres. Whoever did end up directing, the results can't be denied. Poltergeist is still one of the most popular films of the decade and no amount of sequels, TV shows or remakes can recapture the unique blend of the original.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Apr 11, 2017

"Damn! Come back from the grave and ran out of ammunition." Big Ben (Richard Moll) laments his inability to hunt down prey. Specifically, the curly locks of Roger Cobb (William Katt). A successful writer trying to get past his recent divorce, missing child and Vietnam PTSD. Where could he possibly seek refuge from his inner demons? Why, in the House where his aunt killed herself, of course! Nothing too ominous or spooky about that. The Decades of Horror Crew only has one question; is there a guest room they could record in?

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 105 – House (1986)

House, the 1986 horror comedy from Steve Miner (Friday the 13th 3-DLake Placid) is an odd beast. A goofy comedy with rather serious horrific trappings, House sought to balance the silly with the starkly darkest subjects. The goofy ghosts that cause mischief are followed up with disturbing flashbacks to Vietnam and lost children. It's distinctly 80s, including a really out of place synth score and a break up song scored body disposing montage. Something that the kids are definitely not gonna get in their modern blockbusters. They also won't get Norm from Cheers himself George Wendt as a lovable neighbor forever in search of a beer and movie night with his new neighbor. Ah, the things we miss from the 80s.

To reminisce about all of this, Christopher G. Moore and Thomas Mariani welcome back Doc Rotten from his hiatus! Plus, Adam Thomas is along for the ride! Three in a row! The four have varying opinions on House. Some love the tonal whiplash. Others find it jarring. It's a lively discussion full of questions of tone and purpose. Doc is full of insights into the production. Christopher relates the VHS wear and tear he put into his copy. Adam is curious as to how the physics of any of this works. Thomas just wants to know how the hell House II: The Second Story fits into the continuity. Still, one thing all of these gentlemen can agree on: William Katt's shirtless v-neck sweater is 80s fashion at its finest.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com. We also want to be sure to thank Neon Devils for their killer track “Bone Chillin’” which we use for the intro and outro of this show.

Mar 29, 2017

"You wanna see something really scary?" Submitted for your approval, a podcast looking back at an anthology film that's a remake of a classic TV show. Four segments. Four directors. Analyzed by four men. Attempting to figure out which is better. What caused the infamous tragedy on the film's set? Which one makes the most lasting impression? Who can possibly remember that Bill Mumy isn't Ron Howard? All these questions lay linger... in The Twilight Zone... The Movie... the topic of this edition of the podcast.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 104 – Twilight Zone: The Movie (1983)

Twilight Zone: The Movie is a film obviously marred by tragedy. The deaths of Vic Morrow, Renee Chen, and My-ca Dinh Le during an infamous helicopter accident still loom over the film. Yet, aside from that, there's still a lot to enjoy about this anthology. Four directors - two at the height of their fame (John Landis & Steven Spielberg) and two others still up and coming (Joe Dante and George Miller) - were tasked to adapt four different episodes of the iconic anthology show into a segment. The results are eclectic, to say the least. There's a supernatural adventure about bigotry, a sepia toned character piece about old age, a darkly comedic fantasy about a child with God-like powers and a paranoia sweat soaked horror about a fear of flying. Oh, and there's also a prologue with Albert Brooks and Dan Aykroyd. Mix in a diverse cast that also includes Al Leong, Scatman Crothers, Kevin McCarthy, John Lithgow, Kathleen Quinlan and Twilight Zone veteran Burgess Meredith & it's a rather interesting time.

Thomas Mariani and Christopher G. Moore are both out a Doc once again (don't worry, he'll be back next time), so they've recruited Gruesome writer Adam Thomas and filmmaker Bill Mulligan to talk about Twilight Zone The Movie. They talk the industry changing aspects of the tragic accident, contextualize the careers of all these directors from this specific time and compare the adaptations of the episodes to their television counterparts. In ranking all the segments, the results are far more varied than one might expect. Some prefer the heartwarming sugariness of Spielberg. Others prefer the canted angles of Miller. Even some prefer Landis' ability to turn a tragedy into a cohesive short story. It's a passionate discussion that'll show you something really scary.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com. We also want to be sure to thank Neon Devils for their killer track “Bone Chillin’” which we use for the intro and outro of this show.

Mar 14, 2017

"I have come here to chew bubblegum and kick ass... and I'm all out of bubblegum." Nada (Rowdy Roddy Piper) comes out of his consumer coma and is ready to blow some aliens away. The satirical sci-fi actioner from horror master John Carpenter is a schlocky example of 80s cheese... with an actual brain behind it?

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 103 – They Live (1988)

They Live is a bit of a departure for Decades of Horror, given the bigger emphasis on sci-fi and action. Yet, what's more horrifying than realizing you live in a dystopian world ruled by cruel uncaring overlords that trick you in a commercialized sense of ignorance? Well... actually living in that world on a daily basis. Yes, Carpenter's jab at Reagan-era politics still permeates our culture. After all, how many celebrities have been turned into a They Live-style alien to indicate the media obsessed world we live in is all consuming? Unfortunately, we don't have a Rowdy Roddy Piper to suplex the corporate overlords into submission. But hopefully this and many generations to come can be inspired by Piper's lack of hesitation in taking out those that stand in the way of American progress. Or at the very least admire the stamina it takes for him to kick the crap out of Fred Armitage (Keith David) in order to see the truth via his sunglasses.

Luckily, three people here are in awe of Roddy's prowess. Thomas and Christopher G. Moore return to gush about this 1988 John Carpenter film, but are unfortunately short a Doc Rotten to help them out. Luckily, a nomadic drifter has decided to take his place around the fiery trashcan. That is Gruesome Magazine's own Adam Thomas, a man who knows his wrestling as much as he knows his horror and genre filmmaking. Together, these three gush about the infamous fight scene between David & Piper, spotlight the vulnerability under Piper's performance and marvel with disturbed regret at They Live's lasting political relevance. It's a damn good time that's pretty contemplative when you look past the brute force and one liners.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com. We also want to be sure to thank Neon Devils for their killer track “Bone Chillin’” which we use for the intro and outro of this show.

Feb 27, 2017

"This is it, Jennifer: your big break in TV. Welcome to prime time, bitch!" Freddy Krueger (Robert Englund) literally breaks Jennifer (Penelope Sudrow) through the fourth wall. Signaling Kruger's break away hit into pop culture icon status. What better way to celebrate its 30th anniversary than with a whole Decades of Horror 1980s episode dedicated to it?

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 102 – A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors (1987)

After his much celebrated introduction and decried detour of a second chapter, Freddy Krueger returned to terrify teens and adults alike with a bit more comedic flair in Dream Warriors. After young Kristen Parker (Patricia Arquette) has a near suicidal panic during a nightmarish visit from Freddy, her mother sends her off to an institution to work out her waking torment. Under the care of Dr. Neil Gordon (Craig Wasson), Kristen meets several other teens with similar sleeping disorders. Among them, the drug addled Taryn White (Jennifer Rubin); the aggressive shit talker Roland Kincaid (Ken Sagoes); and paralyzed nerd Will Stanton (Ira Heiden). They all share visions of Freddy Krueger and need help getting him out of their dreams. But Dr. Gordon doesn't seem to believe their shared boogeyman... until a mysterious new intern Nancy Thompson (Heather Lagenkamp) reveals her own past with a sweater wearing demon of her nightmares.

While 1984's A Nightmare on Elm Street gave us our introduction to Freddy, Dream Warriors gave us the Freddy we all ended up loving for so many years. The jokes, the elaborate dream sequences and the formula for each teen's descent into the nightmare world all came to light with this third entry. Doc Rotten, Thomas and Christopher G. Moore talk all about it here. The murders, the dream sequences and the... character investment? That's right, our trio dives deep into what separates this from the repetitive sequels that followed and tried very hard to recapture the same energy Dream Warriors pulls off so effortlessly. It helps that people like Wes Craven, Chuck Russell and Frank Darabont were all there to flesh out the Freddy universe without dragging out the details. Or putting too much emphasis on the jokes and cameos, as later entries would do. It's a mutual admiration society meeting for this underrated "meat in the Nightmare on Elm Street sandwich." What the hell does that mean? Listen to find out!

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com. We also want to be sure to thank Neon Devils for their killer track “Bone Chillin'” which we use for the intro and outro of this show.

Feb 11, 2017

"Roses are red, violets are blue, one is dead, and so are you." - The killer from My Bloody Valentine leaves a colorful limerick for Mabel - before throwing her into a dryer set on extra-dead. The Grue-Crew revisit the Canadian slasher film from 1981. Let the fun begin! Thomas Mariani, Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore tackle another gruesome horror film from the 1980s.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 101 – My Bloody Valentine (1981)

During the height of the slasher craze, Canadian film makers dropped a few slasher classics into horror fans laps. One of the better ones is My Bloody Valentine (1981) - director Quentin Tarantino lists the movie as his all-time favorite slasher film. George Mihalka directs the film from a script by John Beaird and a story by Stephen A. Miller. The plot revolves around a small mining town where years ago miners were trapped in the mine while the town celebrated Valentine's Day. The next year, the lone survivor, Harry Warden, went on a murderous rampage killing those who left him and his friends to die. Years later, the town is revisited once again by a killer dressed up in miner garb killing townsfolk leaving their hearts in a valentine's box. It's gruesome, gory gold!

Just in time for the holiday, Thomas, Christopher, and Doc share the love by taking a look at the classic slasher with Christopher and Doc seeing for the first time since 1981 while Thomas is seeing for the first time ever. The Grue-crew review both the original - heavily cut - theatrical version and the restored uncensored version with much of the 9 minutes put back into place. The film holds up tremendously well with some fun characters, great gory gags, and a surprising sense of humor. The uncut version holds a number of gruesome surprises.

We want to hear from you - the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com. We also want to be sure to thank Neon Devils for their killer track "Bone Chillin'" which we use for the intro and outro of this show.

Jan 30, 2017

"A woman died, Tommy." - Dennis Quaid scolds David Patrick Kelly midway through Dreamscape (1984) who replies with dry wit, "Everybody dies..." Dude, that's cold. The Grue-Crew dive into one of three films in just over a year to explore the horrors surrounding entering peoples dreams...and nightmares. Let the fun begin! Thomas Mariani, Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore tackle another gruesome horror film from the 1980s.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 100 – Dreamscape (1984)

The cast alone is worth giving Dreamscape a chance. Dennis Quaid (as Alex Gardner) stars opposite Kate Capshaw as his love interest, Jane DeVries, and David Patrick Kelly as his adversary in exploring the dreamscape, Tommy Ray Glatman. The supporting cast is even more nuts. Max von Sydow may be on Alex's side as Dr. Paul Novotny. Christopher Plummer is duplious as ever as the villainous government official Bob Blair. Eddie Albert suffers from nightmares that only Alex can save him from as The President. And, George Wendt warns Alex of the conspiracies abound as Charlie Prince, a horror author who has stumbled onto the truth behind Dreamscape. Charlie Prince, Stephen King, uh...see what they did there?

Doc and Christopher revisit Dreamscape, not having seen the film in a few decades while Thomas catches the film for the first time. Does the film hold up after three plus decades? How about the special effects and the make-up? The film is directed by Joseph Ruben and the effects are provided by Greg Cannom and David B. Miller among others. The film features a number of green screen effects that hinder the overall tone of the film while the make-up effects for the Nightmare Snake remain thrilling and creepy, especially when in mid-transformation. Look closely and you may catch some stop motion effects too. Regardless of all the debate, one thing stands out and that is fan-favorite David Patrick Kelly between his role in The Warriors and those in Twin Peaks and The Crow - always a winner.

Jan 30, 2017

"A woman died, Tommy." - Dennis Quaid scolds David Patrick Kelly midway through Dreamscape (1984) who replies with dry wit, "Everybody dies..." Dude, that's cold. The Grue-Crew dive into one of three films in just over a year to explore the horrors surrounding entering peoples dreams...and nightmares. Let the fun begin! Thomas Mariani, Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore tackle another gruesome horror film from the 1980s.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 100 – Dreamscape (1984)

The cast alone is worth giving Dreamscape a chance. Dennis Quaid (as Alex Gardner) stars opposite Kate Capshaw as his love interest, Jane DeVries, and David Patrick Kelly as his adversary in exploring the dreamscape, Tommy Ray Glatman. The supporting cast is even more nuts. Max von Sydow may be on Alex's side as Dr. Paul Novotny. Christopher Plummer is duplious as ever as the villainous government official Bob Blair. Eddie Albert suffers from nightmares that only Alex can save him from as The President. And, George Wendt warns Alex of the conspiracies abound as Charlie Prince, a horror author who has stumbled onto the truth behind Dreamscape. Charlie Prince, Stephen King, uh...see what they did there?

Doc and Christopher revisit Dreamscape, not having seen the film in a few decades while Thomas catches the film for the first time. Does the film hold up after three plus decades? How about the special effects and the make-up? The film is directed by Joseph Ruben and the effects are provided by Greg Cannom and David B. Miller among others. The film features a number of green screen effects that hinder the overall tone of the film while the make-up effects for the Nightmare Snake remain thrilling and creepy, especially when in mid-transformation. Look closely and you may catch some stop motion effects too. Regardless of all the debate, one thing stands out and that is fan-favorite David Patrick Kelly between his role in The Warriors and those in Twin Peaks and The Crow - always a winner.

Jan 16, 2017

"He thinks that's funny. He thinks that's a funny thing he's doing." - Crispen Glover cracks wise in Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter as one of the teens in peril as Jason slaughters his way through the night. Meanwhile, Corey Feldman shaves his head and sharpens his machette to give Mrs. Voorhees' favorite son a deep cut. Let the fun begin! Thomas Mariani, Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore tackle another gruesome horror film from the 1980s.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 99 – Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter (1984)

Despite being followed by eight more films (and counting, supposedly), the fourth installment subtitles itself, the Final Chapter. The Godfather of Gore, Tom Savini, returns to do special effects and does his best to bury Jason forever. Paramount's Frank Mancuso, Jr. strives hard to end Jason's reign as well. But, money is money. Savini crafts a barrage of deadly and crimson deaths but saves the best - and most graphic - demise for Jason himself. Writers Barry Cohen and Bruce Hidemi Sakow, along with director Jospeh Zito, provide the series with its hero in Tommy Jarvis (played by a young Corey Feldman) who would appear in the next two films as well.

Christopher G. Moore, Doc Rotten and Thomas Mariani revisit the franchise classic, discussing what makes it stand out among the others. While Roger Ebert described the film as "an immoral and reprehensible piece of trash" in his 1982 review of the film, the Grue-Crew strongly disagree, suggesting it is one of the best slasher films. The film has a distinct pace, creative use of lighting and a gruesome reveal of Jason Voorhees in an ending that rivals the original 1980 classic. And, where else do you get such wonderful Crispen Glover Eighties dance moves? Ch Ch Ch Ah Ah Ah!

We want to hear from you - the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com. We also want to be sure to thank Neon Devils for their killer track "Bone Chillin'" which we use for the intro and outro of this show.

Dec 17, 2016

"Excuse me, I couldn't help noticing that strange and interesting plant. What is it?" The question on the minds of every patron that walks into Mushnik's Flower Shop. The Audrey II is all the rage thanks to Seymour Krelborn (Rick Moranis) and his secret gardening tips. Those tips just so happen to involve blood coming from the tips of his fingers. Pricked from the tips, to be exact. It's all blood, puppetry and high musical notes as Doc, Thomas and Christopher come together to discuss Little Shop of Horrors in honor of the film's 30th anniversary.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 98 – Little Shop of Horrors (1986)

Based on the Off-Broadway musical that was itself based on the 1960 Roger Corman B-Feature, Little Shop of Horrors (1960) takes the Mean Green Mother from Outer Space into the stratosphere. Directed by Muppeteer and Yoda himself Frank Oz, Little Shop of Horrors manages to balance the heavy musical heft of songs written by Alan Menken and Howard Ashman (known for their early 1990s era Disney work on Beauty & the Beast and The Little Mermaid) and the demanding special effects needs of the Audrey II puppet seamlessly. This Faustian tale of poor schmuck Seymour trying to impress the gorgeous girl he works with and respects Audrey (Ellen Greene) by feeding this plant (voiced by Levi Stubbs of the Four Tops) human blood is oddly relatable. Sure, there's a raving mad dentist (Steve Martin) and a Greek chorus of Mo-Town back up singers, but that doesn't stop this rousing story of love, death and foliage from making even the most cynical heart melt as it's fed to a giant plant monster.

Doc, Christopher and Thomas are here to talk the laughs, the horror and the music on this one. It's a mutual lovefest. Doc admits his initial shame from enjoying it among his circle of friends. Christopher regals us with tales of how he played the dentist role in his days as an actor. Thomas in particular is excited because Little Shop of Horrors is his most admitted favorite film of all time. That's right. Favorite. Film. Of. All. Time. Naturally, Thomas takes the reins to guide Doc & Christopher through Skid Row. The discussion ranges from the origin point of the original Roger Corman film to the special effects wizardry that got Frank Oz, Lyle Conway and his team to bring Audrey II to life, creating what Thomas argues is the best special effects creation of all time.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com. We also want to be sure to thank Neon Devils for their killer track “Bone Chillin'” which we use for the intro and outro of this show.

Nov 29, 2016

"You can't tame what's meant to be wild, Doc. It just ain't natural." - John Carradine sets the cast straight with his witty and biting dialog provided by writer John Sayles for Joe Dante's horror classic The Howling. Yes, the "other" werewolf film from 1981 - a bit unfair comparison, certainly, because this film truly stands on its own. Rob Bottin brings his own unique approach to the transformation scene rivaling all other wolf-man films. Let the fun begin! Thomas Mariani, Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore tackle another gruesome horror film from the 1980s.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 97 – The Howling (1981)

The Howling is the first to give us a memorable bipedal wolf-man that looks more wolf-like than human thanks to the talents of Rob Bottin and his team. While most films previously would go for the Larry Talbot variety and An American Werewolf In London would favor the beast on all fours approach, Eddie Quist and friends would stand tall over the less furry cast, with a mouth full of fangs, a body full of fur and ears a foot tall at least. The year 1981 is a monumental year for werewolf films, revolutionizing the sub-genre transforming it as extreme as the men would into wolf. Joe Dante brings his signature satiric look with the film, but, admittedly, not as much as some of his later films would do. The cast is phenomenal featuring Dee Wallace and Christopher Stone in the leading roles with Carradine joined by Dennis Dugan , Belinda Balaski , Patrick Macnee , Kevin McCarthy , Slim Pickens , Elisabeth Brooks, Robert Picardo in supporting roles. Honestly, if you desire werewolves in your werewolf film, look no further than The Howling.

Doc, Christopher and Thomas take a look into the cast and crew behind The Howling, sharing their first viewing of the film and their favorite & most memorable scenes. The dive into the career of Joe Dante and share love for the inevitable cameo from Dick Miller - perhaps this being one of his best. They share some interesting facts and tidbits about the making of the film such as Robert Picardo improvising the line "I want to give you a piece of my mind" before pulling out a bullet from his head. The appreciation of the film is strong but not without a few critical comments about the film. In the end, The Howling remains a remarkable film and accomplishment with its solid direction and terrific practical effects, holding up today just as well as it did when it premiered 35 years ago.

We want to hear from you - the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com. We also want to be sure to thank Neon Devils for their killer track "Bone Chillin'" which we use for the intro and outro of this show.

Nov 15, 2016

"It is in your nature to do one thing correctly: Tremble." - It's the first adaptation of a Thomas Harris novel featuring Hannibal Lecter, known in the screenplay as Lecktor. Manhunter brings Red Dragon to life. For Hannibal fans, both the TV show and the Silence of the Lambs series, Brian Cox is Hannibal the Cannibal in 1986. Let the fun begin! Thomas Mariani, Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore tackle another gruesome horror film from the 1980s.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 96 – Manhunter (1986)

Even since the end of the hit and masterful Hannibal TV series featuring Mads Mikkelsen as Hannibal and Hugh Dancy as Will Graham, the Grue-crew from the Hannibal Fan Podcast have been teasing heading back to the films to review. Well, now Thomas Mariani, Christopher G. Moore and Doc Rotten take the opportunity on Decades of Horror to cover Michael Mann's adaptation of Thomas Harris' acclaimed novel Red Dragon. Given the film title Manhunter, the film celebrates its thirty year anniversary. Brian Cox is Hannibal, William Petersen is Will Graham and Tom Noonan is Francis Dollarhyde. Just as the mystery played out on the final episodes of the NBC TV series, the Tooth Fairy evolves into the Red Dragon with Reba McClane's (Joan Allen) life on the line. "Have you ever seen blood in the moonlight, Will? It appears quite black." - Hannibal to Will.

While Anthony Hopkins is by far the more well-known actor to portray Hannibal Lecter with Mads Mikkelsen still fresh in fans' eyes from the recent TV series, Brian Cox is no slouch in the role either. The Grue-crew banter back and forth about his interpretation of the killer along with Petersen's Will Graham and Dennis Farina's Jack Crawford. A young Stephen (Avatar, Don't Breathe) Lang is nearly unrecognizable as reporter Freddy Lounds and Tom Noonan is creepy as hell as Dolarhyde. There's plenty of comparisons to other films and the TV show as well as a long discussion about director Michael Mann. Ah! Hannibal, how we have missed you.

Oct 31, 2016

"It takes all kinds of critters to make Farmer Vincent fritters." - Rory Calhoun's in Motel Hell dialog is to die for. The design of the killer in a pig mask holding a chainsaw - as seen on the cover of an early issue of Fangoria - is as memorable as any feature from 1980. Yet, the film itself never gets the love and respect it deserves - or, does it? Let the fun begin! Thomas Mariani, Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore tackle another gruesome horror film from the 1980s.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 95 – Motel Hell (1980)

Kevin Conner, the director behind The Land That Time Forgot, Warlords of the Deep, and Arabian Adventure, steps behind the camera once again to deliver a horror film called Motel Hell. Starring Rory Calhoun, Nancy Parsons, Paul Linke, and Nina Axlrod, the slasher flick with a meal plan featuring victims buried up to their heads in a garden of evil, a couple making beef jerky that will make the Sawyer family jealous, and a killer who wears a pig head while doing dangerous battles with a chainsaw. Good times! Recently available on Blu-ray from Scream Factory, the 1980 classic is now available for a new generation of horror fans. The grue-crew dive into the deep end to see if there is anything in the recipe worth devouring. Maybe. Maybe not.

Thomas Mariani is joined by Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore to take a look at the fourth selection for this month's special look at the top horror films of the decade. For this selection it is up the listeners to decide what we review for episode 95. The choices were mostly iconic horror films of the decade: The Shining, A Nightmare on Elm Street, and Fright Night to name a few. The winner was the dark horse of the list, Motel Hell. To champion the film, Gruesome Magazine contributor Jeff Mohr steps in to share the positives for a film the the rest of the grue-crew have a difficult time appreciating. "Meat's meat, a man's gotta eat."

Oct 25, 2016

"You're a regular barnyard exhibit. Sheep's eyes, chicken guts, piggy friends... and SHIT for BRAINS!" - who doesn't enjoy Adrienne Barbeau as Wilma Northrup giving Hal Holbrook as her husband Henry some shit in the delicious anthology entry The Crate? It's classic, really. It also leads to the rewarding comeuppance coming her way. Inspired by EC comics, creating by the decades hottest writing and directing talents, and designed by the Godfather of Gore,  Creepshow (1982) is as good today as it was the day it was first released. Let the fun begin! Thomas Mariani, Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore tackle another gruesome horror film from the 1980s.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 94 – Creepshow (1982)

The third official selection in Decades of Horror 2016 October Selection, CREEPSHOW (1982) is one of the best examples of anthology films. It also features the historic pairing of George Romero and Stephen King. It also has Tom Savini creating the special effects. It is the horror film fan's dream team, especially for the early Eighties. Hell, even today, it's hard to deny this stellar, killer combination of talent. The cast is equally astonishing. Alongside the aforementioned Barbeau and Holbrook, the film stars Leslie Nielsen, E.G. Marshall, Viveca Lindfors, Ed Harris, Ted Danson, Gaylen Ross, Fritz Weaver and John Amplas. Hell, even Stephen King and Tom Savini have roles in the film. Each segments is crafted with an appreciation for the source material and inspirations as well as the fans of the horror genre. The definition of a classic.

Thomas Mariani is joined by Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore to take a look at the third selection for this month's special look at the top horror films of the decade. The grue-crew go from segment to segment sharing their love for the film and the stories. The film begins with Father's Day, setting the tone of the film. It continues with Lonesome Death of Jordy Verrill, giving King the chance to chew the scenery. Something to Tide You Over solidifies the EC comics inspiration while The Crate has fun with the material. They're Creeping Up On You buries its unsuspecting audience under 250,000 cockroaches. Yuck! The prologue/epilogue story reminds the crew why Tom Atkins is a fan favorite. And, C'mon, "Meteor shit!" Does it get any better?

Oct 17, 2016

"I know you gentlemen have been through a lot, but when you find the time, I'd rather not spend the rest of this winter tied to this fucking couch!" - Gary (Donald Moffat) protests mightily after MacReady violently completes the blood test on the trapped survivors in the Antarctic Station! This shocking segment is just one of the many gruesome scenes in John Carpenter's classic sci-fi/horror The Thing (1982). Let the fun begin! Thomas Mariani, Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore tackle another gruesome horror film from the 1980s.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 93 – John Carpenter's The Thing (1982)

The second official selection in Decades of Horror 2016 October Selection, JOHN CARPENTER'S THE THING (1982) is one of the best examples of practical effects in film...ever. Sadly, the film flopped at the box office when it was released in the States on June 25, 1982 - thanks to, in no small part, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. Yet, the film has continued on to become one of the most recognizable and cherished films of the decade. Many claim it is John Carpenter's best film above other horror, genre classics such as Halloween (1978) and Escape from New York (1981). At only 22, effects artist Rob Bottin creates some of the most iconic and enduring effects, holding up today as easily as they amazed horror fans in 1982. The Eighties would not be the same with out this film.

Thomas Mariani is joined by Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore to take a look at the second selection for this month's special look at the top horror films of the decade. Just one year after John Carpenter reinvented Kurt Russell as an action hero as Snake Plissken in Escape from New York (1981), he provides his favorite star with a role that would challenge him ever more than ever before: R.J. MacReady. Set in the Antarctic, John Carpenter's  The Thing follows a group of researches who face the unknown when they are invaded by a creature that can become anything it wants to, including any one of them. Paranoia sets in as the body count rises. No one is safe, everyone is suspect and the audience is treated to sights they've never seen before and will never see again - not even close. The grue-crew look back at the classic horror film from 1982, The Thing.

Oct 10, 2016

"We are the things that were and shall be again! Ahahahaha! Spirits of the book! We want what is yours! LIFE! Dead by dawn! Dead by dawn!" - The Deadites are back to terrorize Ash Williams once again with Sam Raimi's super sick sequel EVIL DEAD II. Groovy! Let the fun begin! Thomas Mariani, Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore tackle another gruesome horror film from the 1980s.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 92 – Evil Dead II (1987)

The first official selection in Decades of Horror 2016 October Selection, EVIL DEAD II is one of the fiercest, funniest classics of the age cementing director Sam Raimi, Bruce Campbell and the lead character Ash as horror icons. The film is full of practical effects lead by Mark Shostrom and supported by the beginnings of KNB, Robert Kurtzman, Greg Nicotero and Howard Berger. The effects are phenomenon, the direction is revolutionary and chaotic, and Bruce Campbell is brilliant as poor, abused Ash. The Eighties would not be the same with out this film.

Thomas Mariani is joined by Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore to take a look at Christopher's selection for this month's special look at the top horror films of the decade. Christopher reveals what the film means to him and how it influenced his love for horror film and his directorial career. Doc shares catching the film when it was released and the reaction it garnered in its NC17 theatrical run. Thomas round out the affection for this film sharing how he caught the film at a young age. Evil Dead II is one of the most influential and magical horror films of the decade. "Then let's head on down into that cellar and carve ourselves a witch." - Ash Williams.

Oct 3, 2016

"Be afraid! Be very afraid!" - one of horror's most famous lines, imitated many times over, originated from tonight's film, David Cronenberg's classic body horror exercise in terror The Fly (1986). A very different film than the original 1956 Vincent Price classic, the terrifying fate of Seth Brundle is a much more horrific and groteque look at what happens when a man is spliced with the DNA of a common house fly. Look out for...Brundlefly. Let the fun begin! Thomas Mariani, Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore tackle another gruesome horror film from the 1980s.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 91 – The Fly (1986)

Coming off his classics Scanners, Videodrome and The Dead Zone, director David Cronenberg crafts his most accessible and more disgusting masterpieces with The Fly (1986). With Seth Brundle, he takes his obsession with body horror to new heights as Brundle's body slowly rejects his human body and becomes half-man, half-fly. The man becomes Brundlefly! Jeff Goldblum stars as Brundle giving the character a lonely, driven pathos that starkly contrasts to the personality - and vitality - the fly-infused version exhibits. The result is fascinating...to the audience. To his love interest reporter Veronica Quaife (Geena Davis), it is terrifying! John Getz rounds out the cast as Stathis Borans, the editor of the magazine Veronica works for, his character is obsessed with exposing Brundle until he fears for Veronica's life and steps into Brundle's path of horror. Oh, and did we say the film was gory. Yeah, it is gory.

Thomas Mariani is joined by Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore to take a look on of the best remakes of a horror film ever made. The grue-crew examine the performances, the direction and the effects as they discuss Seth's journey from Brundle to Brundlefly. They marvel at Jeff Goldblum's terrific performance in the lead role, wondering how did he get overlooked at the Oscars that year. Geena Davis makes an impressive debut providing the line of warning from this article's introduction. But it's the effects that astonish, amaze and nauseate the crew as they look at the transformation and the methods of dissolving Brudlefly's food. Then the discussion turns to whether The Fly is Cronenberg's best film of his entire career.

We want to hear from you - the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com. We also want to be sure to thank Neon Devils for their killer track "Bone Chillin'" which we use for the intro and outro of this show.

Sep 27, 2016

"Something is alive in the funhouse...something that, tonight, will turn the funhouse into a carnival of terror!" - the tagline for Toby Hooper's THE FUNHOUSE promises a nightmare of horror and delivers, mostly, featuring "Gunther" make-up designed by Rick Baker and executed by Craig Reardon. Let the fun begin! Thomas Mariani, Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore tackle another gruesome horror film from the 1980s.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 90 – The Funhouse (1981)

Tobe Hooper returns to the director's chair for the latest horror classic examined by the Grue-crew for Decades of Horror 1980s. This film leads his career directly into Poltergeist where he would flirt with becoming a "Hollywood" director. The Funhouse is a low budget slasher-esque film that has a group of teens sneaking into the traveling carnival's funhouse for the night. While peaking through the floor boards, they witness the mysterious man in the Frankenstein mask strangle the frisky fortune teller to death with his bare hands. Add in some sticky fingers and a curmudgeon carney with a penchant for violence and a horror film is born. The kids try to escape the funhouse with their lives. This is a Hooper film so we know that doesn't go terribly well for these misfit kids. Eh?

Thomas, Christopher, and Doc debate back and forth on the merits of this particular Toby Hooper entry. Some like the setting, some like the make-up while others despise the kids and have a huge issue with the motivation of "The Monster" and the kids as they witness his inability to make good decisions. Let's just say he has trouble understanding the value of money. The make-up is impressively designed but does not have enough articulation to make its onscreen appearances entirely successful. Yes, Hooper shows off his talent in a number of key scenes, most notably when Lis is trapped in a ventilation shaft with the fan behind her and the monster approaching.

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