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Now displaying: Page 6
Dec 17, 2017

In this episode of Groovy Gorey Gruesome Gold, Paul Cardullo goes back to the mid-1970s for the Blaxploitation classic J.D.’s Revenge (1976). In the 1940s, gangster J.D. Walker (David McKnight) witnesses the murder of his sister (Alice Jubert) and then is gunned down by her murderer. Flash forward to 1976 . . .  Isaac, played by Glynn Turman (Cooley High [1976], Gremlins [1984]), is a law student who drives a cab to make ends meet. After being hypnotized during a nightclub act, Isaac’s personality begins to change as he is slowly taken over by J.D.’s spirit. J.D. is seeking revenge on the men involved in his murder, former-gangster-turned-preacher Reverand Elija Bliss (Louis Gossett Jr.) and his brother Theotis (Fred Pinkard). Directed by Arthur Marks and written by Jaison Starkes, the film is refreshingly good and sports a top-notch cast, in spite of the fact that Turman’s portrayal of the possessed version of Isaac can seem a little over-the-top at times. Even though the viewer thinks they know where the story is going, Starkes’ script has J.D.’s actual revenge take a slightly different form than one would expect, giving the film a bit more depth than the usual exploitation fare. Give a listen below and hear why Paul says that this is one for which views should keep an eye out.

Dec 15, 2017

Dancing between found footage, video blogging, and conventional film, The Follower (2017) makes the most out of its concept of a ghost hunting Youtube celebrity, David Baker (Nicolas Shake) encountering a supposed haunting that is far more than he anticipated. The interaction between David and the homeowner Carol (Chloe Dumas) drives much of the first half of the narrative. While the film presents evidence of a haunting, David is convinced that Carol is the problem and leaves. At this point, The Follower begins anew as David discovers something may have followed him home. Nicolas Shake admirably carries most of the film as the lead, David Baker, making a strong impression while Chloe Dumas has fun with the zanier side of Carol. The chemistry between the two is awkward but interesting. An entertaining and solid but gruesomely lightweight effort from director Kévin Mendiboure, The Follower is a perfect film to catch and chill.

Dec 15, 2017

Hope for the best, expect the worst! That's The Grue Crew's motto as Horror News Radio dives head first into The Worst Horror Films of 2017 with special guest Joey Fittos. Each panelist has a fair share of dreck to wade through. There's talk of Tom Cruise battling wrapped up Egyptians, the latest return to the Amityville House and... whatever the hell Kuso was. What other films made the list? Listen and find out! The Grue Crew also discusses Better Watch Out, the yuletide home invasion thriller. It's Home Alone with a twist... but maybe not the one you're thinking of. Plus, there's still plenty of Horror News of the Week to gab about. Mainly involving the trailer for Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, AMC's historical horror mini-series The Terror and a remake of Romero's Day of the Dead. What is this world coming to?

As always, the HNR Grue-Crew would love to hear from you, the listeners, the fans. You can always reach out via email at feedback(AT)horrornewsradio(DOT)com or find us on Twitter: Doc Rotten | Dave Dreher | Thomas Mariani. Also, like us on Facebook and join the Horror News Radio Facebook Group.

Horror News Radio
Episode 245 – The Worst Horror Films of 2017 – Better Watch Out
Subscribe – iTunes – Facebook – Stitcher

INTRO [00:00:39]

HORROR NEWS OF THE WEEK [00:02:50]

FEATURE REVIEW: BETTER WATCH OUT [00:24:10]

  •  Better Watch Out (2017)
  • director: Chris Peckover
  • cast: Olivia DeJonge, Levi Miller, Ed Oxenbould

ANNOUNCEMENTS [00:52:08]

  • It’s December and 2017 is coming to a close. In the coming weeks, we will be doing our popular “Best and Worst of the Year” episodes. We want to hear from you. Head over to here to share your favorite … and not so favorite… films of 2017.
  • In February, we will be working with the Nevermore Film Festival in Durham, NC to present THE MANITOU on the Big Screen in honor of Santos Ellin Jr. / the Black Saint. Anyone who can make it to the Festival the weekend of February 23 – 25, 20i18. We will have more details as we get closer to the dates. Head over to gruesomemagazine.com/manitou to keep up with this event.

WHAT HAVE YOU BEEN WATCHING: The Worst Films of 2017 [00:53:18]

FEEDBACK/SUPPORT HNR [01:35:03]

  • Patrons who donate as low as $1 can now vote for an upcoming Decades of Horror 1970s on our Patreon Page. Voting ends December 22nd.
  • Thanks to Tear Out the Heart and Victory Records for use of the song Undead Anthem for the intro and outro of the HNR podcast

HNR LINKS:

Dec 13, 2017

"EUREKA! This year, Christmas will be OURS!" Jack Skellington (Chris Sarandon/Danny Elfman) makes his proclamation to the citizens of Halloweentown. The holiday he just discovered will be his to mold and reshape into something spooky. The Nightmare Before Christmas is a holiday classic for every horror fan. Director Tim Bur-er, I mean Henry Selick gives this stop-motion world a chance to breathe and live for the limited run time. It was a movie Disney didn't believe in upon initial release, yet it's become a massive merchandising bonanza. How? Well, Decades of Horror 1990s and Beyond is gonna do the best it can to explain that.

Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond
Episode 32 – The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993)

Nightmare Before Christmas - based on the poem written by Tim Burton during his days as a Disney animator - follows Jack, The Pumpkin King. Leader of Halloweentown and the symbol all others judge themselves against, Jack feels empty inside. The annual Halloween celebration has turned him into a depressed skeleton man who wanders into the alternate world of Christmas Town. Inspired by the unique holiday qualities, Jack decides to take Santa's place for Christmas. All while the patchwork girl Sally (Catherine O'Hara) tries to stop him. It's all done in a musical stop-motion animation style so gorgeous it got the film a Best Special Effects Oscar nomination.

All this is discussed 24 audio frames at a time by Thomas Mariani and his guests Christopher G. Moore, Caitlin Turner and Scott Johnson. All are here to discuss Nightmare Before Christmas as a highly influential watermark for animation in general. Henry Selick's visuals would bring us the films of LAIKA. Pixar is credited for the computer effects. Tim Burton has ripped this off with Corpse Bride. There's also plenty of big questions asked. Is this a Halloween or Christmas movie? What is the relationship between Sally and Dr. Finkelstein (William Hickey)? Would Hot Topic survive without Nightmare Before Christmas? Listen to find out!

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or tweet Thomas @NotTheWhosTommy. Also, make sure to give us some love via iTunes reviews and ratings. Helps us get more notice along the way.

The intro and outro is “Suck City” by Black Math. Look for more of their music via Free Music Archive.

Next Episode

Dog Soldiers (2002)

 

Dec 13, 2017

While the IMDb suggests that Blood Harvest (2017) is "Onus meets the Texas Chainsaw Massacre," the film is something else entirely. It is a beautiful, silly, little film - lush, green, and vibrant with its Irish countryside locations. However, the film is full of alien vampires who have committed 36 murders that the local police are keeping hidden. Thankfully for horror fans, the killers provide the film with plenty of blood and gore. Blood Harvest is from writer/director George Clarke and features Alan Crawford, Racheal Galloway, and Griffin Madill. Filled with wacky one-liners and tonally bouncing between monster film and torture port, the film is all over the place and tough to follow. Catch the full review below.

Dec 13, 2017

“You have nothing to lose but your mind.” One of the final Amicus anthology films is prepared to drive you insane as Dr. Martin (Robert Powell) interviews the patients of a mental asylum searching for the head doctor who recently lost his mind in Asylum (1972). Roy Ward Baker directs from a script by Robert Block featuring Peter Cushing, Britt Ekland, and Hebert Lom. Doc Rotten and Jeff Mohr are joined by Chad Hunt and Bill Mulligan along with special guest-host Eli Mohr.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 64 – Asylum (1972)

With titles like Dr. Terror's House of Horrors, Tales from the Crypt, and Torture Garden, Amicus Films threatened to give Hammer Films a run for their money...but never quite reached that goal. By the time they caught up with the studio that gave us Horror of Dracula and Curse of Frankenstein, the horror genre was maturing into its modern era as films like Night of the Living Dead, Rosemary's Baby, and The Exorcist captured the audience's attention. Asylum is one of the final films in their series of portmanteau films - and quite possibly one of its forgotten best. The wrap around story is woven into the film's fourth tale "Mannikins of Horror" featuring a murdering toy robot while Peter Cushing stars alongside Barry Morse in a tragic tale called "The Weird Tailor". Britt Ekland guides Charlotte Rampling down a sordid path in "Lucy Comes to Stay" while Richard Todd faces his slain wife's revenge in "Frozen Fear". A terrific film that has the Grue-Crew enjoying every frame.

"See what the author of 'Psycho' is up to now!" - the poster tagline pimps the fact that the screenwriter, Robert Bloch, is the man responsible for Alfred Hitchcock's beloved horror classic.

The Grue-Crew are thrilled to welcome Jeff's grandson Eli onto the show to review Asylum. A new experience for the lad, Eli starts off things noticing how the music in the first segment, Frozen Short, uses unusual cues to signal the various terrors that threaten Richard Todd in his basement. The Crew agrees with him about the acting as well, as each of the cast - especially Peter Cushing - give the film their all, providing the film with a bit more class that may be expected. Chad shares his own terrifying tale of facing a mannequin in his grandmother's attic when he was young, a fear that he would have to face in the "Mannikins of Horror" segment. Except for Eli, who recently caught the film for this podcast, the rest of the crew remember catching the film when it was originally released - or, in the case of Doc, re-released under the title House of Crazies.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Dec 10, 2017

In this edition of Groovy Gory Gruesome Gold, Paul Cardullo gets his first taste of 1970s Turkish Action Cinema with the funky classic The Sword and The Claw (aka Kiliç Aslan and Lionman) (1975). The film is an unusual mix of Tarzan and a sword-and-sandal epic. While Tarzan is raised by apes, Süleyman (Turkish megastar Cüneyt Arkin), the hero of The Sword and The Claw, is raised by lions. This helps him to develop his fighting technique, which mostly consists of slashing as his opponent's faces with his hands. This "Turkish Tarzan" is the long-lost son of King Solomon, who was murdered by an evil prince. Now, Süleyman must team with the resistance to overcome the usurper. Words almost cannot do justice the whacked-out action in this film, which features much acrobatic work choreographed to the repeated strains of the Adagio from Aram Khachaturian's classical ballet Spartacus. There is fun action throughout, but the highlight is the true wackadoodle ten-minute finale wherein good guys and bad guys go flying through the air, presumably propelled by unseen trampolines, and much blood is spilled. Is it a good film? Probably not. Is it an entertaining film? Most definitely. Paul has a ball relating to Doc the experience of watching The Sword and The Claw which is being released on January 23, 2018,  by American Genre Film Archive (AGFA) in a new 4K restoration on Blu-ray made from the only surviving 35-millimeter printListen to his review below and see why you too just may become a fan of 1970s Turkish Action Cinema.

Dec 9, 2017

They made Another Wolfcop? Yes, time to grab your liquor donuts and favorite Canadian brew of choice for the second lycan officer horror comedy adventure on Horror News Radio. It's an abbreviated episode of the show, but luckily Doc Rotten and Thomas Mariani have guest Vanessa there to help out. All three are here to to fight off lizard beings and snort some moon rocks. Before all that, our Grue Crew has Horror News of the Week to talk about. Stories include Sabrina The Teenage Witch going satanic, American Gods showrunner shake-ups and the mysteries of what a Guillermo Del Toro run Dark Universe could be. Oh well. A horror fan can dream.

As always, the HNR Grue-Crew would love to hear from you, the listeners, the fans. You can always reach out via email at feedback(AT)horrornewsradio(DOT)com or find us on Twitter: Doc Rotten | Dave Dreher | Thomas Mariani. Also, like us on Facebook and join the Horror News Radio Facebook Group.

Horror News Radio
Episode 244 – Another WolfCop
Subscribe – iTunes – Facebook – Stitcher

INTRO [00:00:39]

HORROR NEWS OF THE WEEK [00:03:52]

ANNOUNCEMENTS [00:29:50]

  • It's December and 2017 is coming to a close. In the coming weeks, we will be doing our popular "Best and Worst of the Year" episodes. We want to hear from you. Head over to here to share your favorite ... and not so favorite... films of 2017.
  • In February, we will be working with the Nevermore Film Festival in Durham, NC to present THE MANITOU on the Big Screen in honor of Santos Ellin Jr. / the Black Saint. Anyone who can make it to the Festival the weekend of February 23 - 25, 20i18. We will have more details as we get closer to the dates. Head over to gruesomemagazine.com/manitou to keep up with this event.

FEATURE REVIEW: ANOTHER WOLFCOP [00:32:54]

  •  Another WolfCop (2017)
  • director: Lowell Dean
  • cast: Leo Fafard, Amy Matysio, Jonathan Cherry, Yannick Bisson, Serena Miller

FEEDBACK/SUPPORT HNR [01:06:49]

  • Patrons who donate as low as $1 can now vote for an exclusive episode of HNR on our Patreon Page. Voting ends December 14th.
  • Thanks to Tear Out the Heart and Victory Records for use of the song Undead Anthem for the intro and outro of the HNR podcast

HNR LINKS:

Dec 9, 2017

The anthology film Monster Pool: Seven Deadly Sins (2017) explores each of the deadly sins with a series of unique twists and turns. A trio of directors unites to deliver the horror feature, Kyle Martellacci, Randy Smith, and Vincent Valentino. The cast includes Jennifer Allanson, Matt Armstrong, and Troy Arsenian. Gluttony wins the grossest award with its grisly scenes. while Lust wins the favorite trophy. The shorts creatively mix horror and Twilight-Zone inspired stories and tales of terror.

[powerpress]

Dec 7, 2017

“For all they’ve tried, the Mexicans haven’t been able to destroy it,” says the electronic voice of the Venusian’s computer when describing Mexico in The Ship of Monsters (1960), aka La Nave de los Monstruos. Our very own Joseph Perry was so enamored with “Tiki Brain Guy” and Cyclops in Santo and Blue Demon Against the Monsters (Episode 19), he decided to take us back in time to 1960 to experience their earlier roles as Tagual and Uk, respectively. Ride along as this episode’s Grue Crew - Joseph Perry, Chad Hunt, Jeff Mohr, and special guest host Kieran Fisher - take an interplanetary voyage on The Ship of Monsters!

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 23 – The Ship of Monsters (1960)

In The Ship of Monsters, the female population of Venus is in desperate need of men for the purposes of procreation and the survival of their race, To that end, the Venusians organize a mission whereby a rocketship and its crew will embark on a voyage to various planets to retrieve the best men from each and bring them back to repopulate Venus. The ship’s crew, Gamma (Ana Bertha Lepe) and Beta (Lorena Velázquez), start their mission suitably clothed for space travel in their one-piece swimsuits.

By the time they get to Earth, they’ve acquired several male specimens: Tagual, Prince of Mars; Uk, a slobbering cyclops from the Red Planet; Utirr, a half-tick, half-spider creature with telescoping appendages from the fire planet; Zok, a sabre-toothed primate skeleton creature; and Tor, a robot from a barren planet whose population had long gone extinct. They are, indeed, a ship of monsters when they land on Earth and encounter the best male Earth has to offer, Lauriano (Eulalio González, aka Piporro), a tall-tale-telling cowboy with a decidedly comedic bent. Throw in an incognito vampire’s plot to take over Earth and an interspecies love story or two and you have the ridiculous, but hilarious tale told in The Ship of Monsters.

This Mexican production is directed by Rogelio A. González and and the very smart script is written by José María Fernández Unsáin and Alfredo Varela. Don’t let the cheap monster suits fool you! The filmmakers successfully skewer the alien invasion film genre as well as racism, colonialism, and a few other -isms in a way that will have you laughing out loud. The members of this episode’s Grue Crew each give The Ship of Monsters a very strong thumbs up!

Listen and you’ll be able to tell which of us made these comments regarding The Ship of Monsters:

  • “I think that was maybe the underlying message for the film with all this weird interspecies shenanigans.”
  • “Beta, she’s a naughty one.”
  • “You’re asking how blown was your mind when you really thought about it? I tried not to really think about it because I kept throwing up in my mouth a little bit.”
  • “I’ve seen Humanoids of the Deep like a thousand times so I’m not bothered by that stuff any more.”
  • “They had me at, ‘This is an atom.’”

We plan to release a new episode every other week. The next episode in our very flexible schedule is Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956), selected and hosted by Jeff Mohr.

Please let us know what you think of Decades of Horror: The Classic Era and what films you’d like to hear us cover! We want to hear from you! After all, without you, we’re just four nutjobs talking about the films we love. Send us an email  (chadhunt@gruesomemagazine.com, erinmiskell@gruesomemagazine.com, jeffmohr@gruesomemagazine.com, or josephperry@gruesomemagazine.com) or leave us a message, a review, or a comment at GruesomeMagazine.com, iTunes, Stitcher, the Horror News Radio App, or the Horror News Radio Facebook group.

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you for listening!

 

 

 

 

Dec 6, 2017

Gruesome's coverage of Blood in the Snow Film Festival continues with a fantasy, sci-fi thriller Darken (2017). Audrey Cummings directs from a script by RJ Lackie with a cast lead by Olunike Adeliyi, Paul Amos, and Rob Archer. In the story, Eve steps through a door into an alternate world where the denizens worship a woman named Mother Darken who hasn't been seen in many years. In her absence, Clarity rules with an iron fist. The film grows in interest as the mystery begins to unfold but the ambitious film's reach exceeds its grasp. The scope of the film feels better suited for an episodic television show than a single movie.

Dec 6, 2017

"Great party, isn't it?" The ghosts are all calling this party a big success. Congrats to Jack Torrance (Jack Nicholson) for being pull it off. Especially with his wife Wendy (Shelley Duvall) and son Danny (Danny Lloyd) constantly nagging him about "please don't kill us." Pfft. Family, am I right? The Shining is a pretty big example of Stephen King adaptations, one commonly derided for not being too close to the book. Did Stanley Kubrick's lack of faithfulness stop it from being covered on the show? You're damn right it didn't!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 125 – The Shining (1980)

Based on the massive best seller from Stephen King, The Shining isn't too faithful to its source material. While the book heavily relies on knowing the madness behind Jack Torrance, Stanley Kubrick's film is more external. It shows the madness for what it is. Presenting the irrational haunts in a rational fashion. This dichotomy is what creates the conflicts of the Torrance family as they fall apart. The Shining isn't subtle, but the scares are just as big as Nicholson's wails of "DANNY!" Plus, Kubrick helped revolutionized the steadicam, creating smooth movements that revolutionized what cinema could be.

To celebrate all of this, Thomas, Doc Rotten and Christopher G. Moore attend the Overlook Hotel's July 4th Ball in the middle of winter. Now, some people on this crew admit they weren't huge fans of Kubrick's vision initially. Yet, it seems like there's a few converts to The Shining here. There's praise all around for Kubrick's direction, Nicholson's performance and the terrifying ghosts. However, there's also some crucial questions being asked. Could Chevy Chase have made a good Jack Torrance? Does Jack have "The Shine" like Danny? Wasn't Scatman Crothers also Hong Kong Phooey? All these and more are answered, folks!

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Next Episode

The Blob (1988)

Dec 6, 2017

Part fairy tale, part horror movie, The Gatehouse (2017) from director  Martin Gooch delivers the goods. Scarlett Rayner, Simeon Willis, Linal Haft, Paul Freeman, Hannah Waddingham, Alix Wilton Regan, and Melissa Knatchbull star. Lead Rayner is exceptional, sucking you into her plights of dealing with the loss of her mom and facing the horrors of the forest nearby, including a fantastic practical effect creature. The gore is fun but the CGI is a little rough. Gooch provides a solid script as well. Well worth your time when you come across The Gatehouse.

Dec 5, 2017

Cody Calahan directs Let Her Out (2017) featuring  Alanna LeVierge, Nina Kiri, and Adam Christie. The story finds Helen (LeVierge) discovering that she has a tumor that appears to be the byproduct of a "phantom twin" that was absorbed in utero. Part body horror, part supernatural, part "possession" story, Let Her Out provides plenty of cringe-worthy story and effects that will delight horror fans and Gruesome listeners. LeVierge is spectacular in the lead and Calahan steers the cast and crew through a promising tale of thrilling terror.

Dec 4, 2017

Doc Rotten reins in another found footage film for Gruesome Magazine, this time from our good friends a POV Horror and Found Footage Files. The film is called The Last Witch (2017) from director Carlos Almón Muñoz. Following a trio of friends investigating a local legend about a witch that was killed along with her entire cover but her body was never recovered. Since then, even now hundreds of years later, the rumors persist that she still haunts the local village. Feeling very much in the vein of Blair Witch Project, The Last Witch struggles to strike its own mark but involves its characters into the mythology far more than other similar films.

Dec 1, 2017

The Grue Crew needs some rubbing alcohol after Nails digged into them. Horror News Radio tackles this Irish horror film about a hospital bound woman (Shauna MacDonald of The Descent) haunted by a ghost. Thomas and guest Chad Hunt then celebrate the release of Coco, Pixar's latest film focused around Dia de Los Muertos and talking skeletons singing their rib cages out. Muy Bueno! Dave and Doc Rotten even manage to sneak in a few bites at Attack of the Killer Donuts! Before all of that though, Dave's got Horror News of the Week to unveil. Including stories about KISS teaming up with Ash to slay Deadites, Jason Voorhees hunting down Cheech & Chong and a new Children of the Corn film that we totally needed!

As always, the HNR Grue-Crew would love to hear from you, the listeners, the fans. You can always reach out via email at feedback(AT)horrornewsradio(DOT)com or find us on Twitter: Doc Rotten | Dave Dreher | Thomas Mariani. Also, like us on Facebook and join the Horror News Radio Facebook Group.

Horror News Radio
Episode 243 – Nails - Coco
Subscribe – iTunes – Facebook – Stitcher

INTRO [00:00:37]

HORROR NEWS OF THE WEEK [00:03:14]

FEATURE REVIEW: NAILS [00:26:04]

  • Nails (2017)
  • director: Dennis Bartok (w/ Tom Abrams)
  • cast: Shauna Macdonald, Ross Noble, Leah McNamara, Richard Foster-King

CONTEST: COMET TV TEEN WOLF PACK WINNER! [00:51:23]

  • CONTEST: Comet TV Teen Wolf Swag Bag Giveaway
    • Winner: Ashley Kolpak
    • Teen Wolf, Wolfcop, American Werewolf in London, Howling, House of Frankenstein, Dog Soldiers

WHAT HAVE YOU BEEN WATCHING: COCO (2017) [00:52:23]

  • Coco (2017)
  • director: Lee Unkrich, Adrian Molina
  • cast: Anthony Gonzalez, Gael Garcia Bernal, Benjamin Bratt

FEEDBACK/SUPPORT HNR [01:13:10]

  • Patrons who donate as low as $1 have until November 29th to vote for the last Decades of Horror 1990s and Beyond episode on the Gruesome Magazine Patreon Page.
  • Thanks to Tear Out the Heart and Victory Records for use of the song Undead Anthem for the intro and outro of the HNR podcast

WHAT HAVE YOU BEEN WATCHING: ATTACK OF THE KILLER DONUTS (2017) [01:15:10]

  • Attack of the Killer Donuts (2017)
  • director: Scott Wheeler
  • cast: Justin Ray, Kassandra Voyagis, Michael Swan, C. Thomas Howell

HNR LINKS:

Nov 30, 2017

"A ghost is me." Dr. Casares (Federico Luppi) finally comes to terms with what he has become. As we all must do when facing The Devil's Backbone. Following the infamous production problems of Mimic, writer/director Guillermo Del Toro left Hollywood for a moment to collect himself. The film spawned from this - The Devil's Backbone - is a fascinating look at isolation, loss and destitution as a group of orphans try to fight for their lives. All while a mysterious spectre lurks in the basement. Thomas and his co-hosts are here to taste test that weird fetus juice as they dive into Del Toro in honor of his upcoming film The Shape of Water.

Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond
Episode 31 – The Devil's Backbone (2001)

While considered an older sibling to Guillermo Del Toro's big Oscar nomination heavy splash Pan's LabyrinthThe Devil's Backbone often feels left alone in the dust. Much like young Carlos (Fernando Tielve) is at the orphanage of Dr. Casares and his wife Carmen (Marisa Paredes). Carlos often gets picked on by the other orphans, particularly as Jaimie (Inigo Garces) picks on him. He eventually starts seeing some mysterious shapes and shadows, only to find out that this orphanage is haunted by the ghost of a young boy named Santi (Junio Valverde). Is this ghost out to kill or to protect the children?

Well, Thomas and his guests Caitlin Turner, Adam Thomas and Christopher G. Moore are here to answer such a crucial question. The Devil's Backbone is discussed at length by these four. All of them wonder why it isn't as well appreciated as other Del Toro films. Christopher G. Moore dishes out some intriguing trivia. Caitlin appreciates the more female gaze perspective. Adam is still frozen with tension at that door scene. Thomas just wants to know why the hell that one lady trying putting out a gas fire with a blanket. All this and more is revealed as they dive directly into The Devil's Backbone.

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1990s And Beyond podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or tweet Thomas @NotTheWhosTommy. Also, make sure to give us some love via iTunes reviews and ratings. Helps us get more notice along the way.

The intro and outro is “Suck City” by Black Math. Look for more of their music via Free Music Archive.

Next Episode

The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993)

Nov 29, 2017

Indie horror icon Todd Sheets gets behind the camera once again to bring us an old school werewolf flick, Bonehill Road (2017).  Proudly touting a CGI free film, Todd pays homage to the classic werewolf films of our youth and brings scream queen Linnea Quigley along to raise the decibel level. And a bloody pack of werewolves to satisfy every werewolf fan.  Blood flows, teeth tear and hair sprouts in all its low budget indie spectacle.  Join Dave as he harkens back to the good old days of straight-to-VHS horror gruesome greatness.

Nov 29, 2017

Straight from the Blood in the Snow Canadian Film Festival held November 23 through November 26, 2017, in Toronto comes the holiday gorrific gem Once Upon a Time at Christmas (2017). Doc shares his reactions with Jeff Mohr praising the structure, the jolly villains, and the super splendid splatter. Simon Phillips and Sayla de Goede (credited as Sayla Vee) makes an entertaining pair of murderous misfits dressed as Santa Claus and Mrs. Claus. The film gives holiday favorites Silent Night Deadly Night and Christmas Evil a run for the money. A favorite from the festival, Once Upon a Time a Christmas from director Paul Tanter arrives just in time for some gruesome holiday cheer.

Nov 26, 2017

“Maybe you two kids are on a trip or something. I don't know and I don't care.” Sheriff Jones (Richard Webb) has little patience for Bobby Hartford (Robert Walker Jr) and Lisa Clark (Gwynne Gilford) as they describe being attacked by a monstrous man-eating blob in Beware! The Blob (1972). Jeff Mohr, Chad Hunt, and Bill Mulligan are ready to pounce on Doc Rotten for suggesting this disastrous "treat" of a goofy horror film from director Larry Hagman - yeah, J.R. Ewing from the Dallas TV show (and Major Anthony Nelson from I Dream of Jeanie decades earlier). Oh, boy, this is going to get ripe.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 63 – Beware! the Blob (1972)

On a minuscule $150,000 budget shot almost entirely using friends and neighbors, Larry Hagman and Anthony Harris would craft a horror comedy sequel to Jack Harris' 50's monster movie classic The Blob (1958). Sadly, Beware! The Blob comes nowhere near as iconic or thrilling (or professional) as the film that inspired it. The supporting cast would include a who's who of TV actors of the Sixties and Seventies: Godfrey Cambridge, Richard Stahl, Carol Lynley, Marlene Clark, Gerrit Graham, Dick Van Patten, Del Close, Cindy Williams, Tiger Joe Marsh, and Burgess Meredith. While most everything about the film is subpar, on a curiosity level, the film is mildly entertaining. Beware this movie!

"It's loose again eating everyone!" - the poster tagline promises far more than the film delivers.

Being good spirits, the Grue-crew desperately try to find good things about the film. Mostly, they get distracted by all the cameos. The dialog, rumored to be mostly improvised, has the crew plugging their ears instead of covering their eyes. Still, there are some silly moments that give the film some gas but the effects are shotty and the direction is...worse. It is not difficult to see that this is Larry Hagman's sole cinematic directorial effort. Bill Mulligan wins the trivia award of the week for pointing out that Del Close, who has a cameo in this picture, is featured prominently in the 1988 remake from Chuck Russell. Go, team!

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Nov 24, 2017

Playing at the Screamfest Film Festival this past October and the Atlanta Horror Film Festival, Ruin Me (2017) took home the "Best Feature Film" award at the latter event. Doc Rotten takes a seat to take a look at what all the buzz is about and confirms that Atlanta got this one right. Ruin Me from director Prestin DeFrancis and written by Trysta A. Bissett & Preston DeFrancis is an undeniable treat for all horror fans. It features an extreme sleep over campaign called Slasher Sleepout, an unreliable narrator, and a possible escaped convict picking off our cast one-by-one - serious, what is not to love! The film also has a great cast with Marcienne Dwyer in the lead supported by Matt Dellapina, Chris Hill, Eva Hamilton, John Odom, Cameron Gordon, and Sam Ashdown. Doc is excited to give this his seal of approval, check out the review to find out why.

Nov 22, 2017

 

Justice League lands with a 93 Million dollar thud. But the Grue-Crew find plenty to enjoy with the League while questioning some of the forced humor, vanishing mustaches, and the (yet again) terrible villain. What is happening with the superhero films? Dave Dreher is here to provide some news about George Romero's rare cut of NOTLD, Steven Soderbergh's new horror film, and The Rock's adventures in the Rampage game-to-movie adaptation. Also, Doc and Thomas share their misadventures with a Patreon Livestream Q&A.

As always, the HNR Grue-Crew would love to hear from you, the listeners, the fans. You can always reach out via email at feedback(AT)horrornewsradio(DOT)com or find us on Twitter: Doc Rotten | Dave Dreher | Thomas Mariani. Also, like us on Facebook and join the Horror News Radio Facebook Group.

Horror News Radio
Episode 242 – Justice League
Subscribe – iTunes – Facebook – Stitcher

 

INTRO [00:00:39]

HORROR NEWS OF THE WEEK [00:02:14]

FEATURE REVIEW: Justice League [00:22:21]

  • Justice League (2017)
  • director: Zack Snyder w/ Joss Whedon and Chris Terrio
  • cast: Ben Affleck, Gal Gadot, Henry Cavill, Ezra Miller, Ray Fisher, Jason Momoa, Amy Adams, Jeremy Irons, Diane Lane, Connie Nielsen, J.K. Simmons, Joe Morton, Ciaran Hinds, Amber Heard

CONTEST: COMET TV TEEN WOLF PACK! [01:37:27]

  • CONTEST: Comet TV Teen Wolf Swag Bag Giveaway

FEEDBACK/SUPPORT HNR [01:38:38]

  • Patrons who donate as low as $1 have until November 29th to vote for the last Decades of Horror 1990s and Beyond episode on the Gruesome Magazine Patreon Page.
  • Thanks to Tear Out the Heart and Victory Records for use of the song Undead Anthem for the intro and outro of the HNR podcast

HNR LINKS:

 

Nov 21, 2017

“Have a potato.” So said Horace Femm (Ernest Thesiger), one of our hosts as we all sat down to dinner. Join this episode’s Grue Crew as we seek shelter from the storm in The Old Dark House (1932). It seemed like a swell idea at the time. Erin Miskell was not able to join us on this one, so Chad Hunt, Joseph Perry, and Jeff Mohr had to do all the heavy lifting themselves. (They all shouted in their best impersonation of Joey Starrett in Shane,“Come back, Erin!”)

Decades of Horror: The Classic Era
Episode 22 – The Old Dark House (1932)

The story of The Old Dark House begins with five weary travelers caught between avalanches on a stormy night and searching for a place to spend the night. The first to arrive are the Wavertons - Philip (Raymond Massey) and Margaret (Gloria Stuart) - and their travel companion, a light-hearted chap named Penderel (Melvyn Douglas). They are joined a short time later by Sir William Porterhouse (Charles Laughton) and his travel companion Gladys (Lilian Bond). Both groups of travelers are greeted at the door by Morgan (Boris Karloff), the owners’ mute and intimidating butler. They are soon joined by Horace Femm (Ernest Thesiger) and his sister Emma (Eva Moore). Eventually, the Femms’ guests learn of the third Femm sibling, the insane and dangerous Saul (Brember Wills), and meet his 102-year-old, bedridden father, Sir Roderick Femm (Elspeth Dudgeon). Many high jinx ensue in tandem with seriously dreadful and life threatening encounters.

The second of director James Whale’s four entries in the Universal horror pantheon, The Old Dark House is rife with the director’s signature shadow play, comedic overtones, and attention to detail.  The entire film takes place during the clichéd dark and stormy night lit only by flickering candlelight, oil lamplight, and fireplace flame, but cinematographer Arthur Edeson still delivers clear but menacing depictions of the the goings-on in The Old Dark House. Boris Karloff receives star billing in contrast to his “hidden” credit in Frankenstein (1931), but still is not given a single line of dialogue to utter.

Chad and Jeff (he does go on) enthusiastically recommend repeated viewings of The Old Dark House. Joseph also recommends the film and promises repeated viewings in the future.

We plan to release a new episode every other week. The next episode in our very flexible schedule is The Ship of Monsters (1960) aka La Nave de los Monstruos, selected and hosted by Joseph Perry.

Please let us know what you think of Decades of Horror: The Classic Era and what films you’d like to hear us cover! We want to hear from you! After all, without you, we’re just four nutjobs talking about the films we love. Send us an email  (chadhunt@gruesomemagazine.com, erinmiskell@gruesomemagazine.com, jeffmohr@gruesomemagazine.com, or josephperry@gruesomemagazine.com) or leave us a message, a review, or a comment at GruesomeMagazine.com, iTunes, Stitcher, the Horror News Radio App, or the Horror News Radio Facebook group.

To each of you from each of us, “Thank you for listening!

 

 

 

 

 

Nov 21, 2017

"Who the hell is going to believe a ritual sacrificial murder in 1982?!" Sgt Powell (Richard Roundtree) asking the question on everyone's mind. Yet - in a film with a flying lizard creature, cop drama and an interpersonal struggle of an ex-junkie - a ritual sacrifice is the bottom barrel in the list of weird crap in Q The Winged Serpent. Our Patreon picked episode! Do we owe our friends a skyscraper roof sunbathing session? Or are we hoping they get covered in poop? Listen to find out!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 124 – Q The Winged Serpent (1982)

Q The Winged Serpent is a hodgepodge of so many film tropes. There's the giant flying monster eating people, which is one we're all more than familiar with. Leading to a buddy cop drama where Sgt. Powell and his partner Detective Sheppard (David Carradine) investigate the string of ritual sacrificial murders in the wake of this creature. Meanwhile, an ex-junkie turned thief (Michael Moriarty) becomes seduced by the power of the titular bird and holds leverage over the city while arguing with his girlfriend (Candy Clark). Needless to say, it's all over the place.

To decipher all the plots, Christopher G. Moore, Thomas Mariani and Doc Rotten sit down to discuss Q The Winged Serpent in detail. Christopher is baffled by Michael Moriarty's crazed performance. Thomas praises the barrage of influences that crafted a pretty unique package. Doc really wants to know what happened to all the poop. Regardless, they're all very happy that the folks at Patreon gave them an interesting film to discuss. After all, how many monster flicks have improvised jazz piano? Exactly!

Contact Us

We want to hear from you – the coolest, most gruesome fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at thomasmariani@decadesofhorror.com or docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Special thanks to Neon Devils for their awesome song Bone Chillin!

Next Episode

The Shining (1980)

Nov 19, 2017

Paul Cardullo sits down with Doc Rotten to review one of the unsung classics found in the George A. Romero collection from Arrow Video, Between Night and Dawn. The film is Season of the Witch (1972) originally called Jack's Wife and released under the title Hungry Wives. Paul shares the strange and unusual history of Romero's "witchcraft" offering. He praises actress Jan White who plays the lead and encourages horror fans - especially Romero fans - to hold out until the third act which pays off this early Romero film. Check out the review for more.

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