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Now displaying: Category: Monster Movie Podcast
Nov 28, 2022

“Tetsuo is our friend. If anyone is going to kill him, it should be us.” That’s what friends are for, right? Join your faithful Grue-Crew – Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, Crystal Cleveland, and Jeff Mohr  – as they take on the Decades of Horror universe’s first anime in Katsuhiro Ôtomo’s Akira (1988).

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 220 – Akira (1988)

Join the Crew on the Gruesome Magazine YouTube channel!
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A secret military project endangers Neo-Tokyo when it turns a biker gang member into a rampaging psychic psychopath who can only be stopped by a teenager, his gang of biker friends, and a group of psychics.

 

Akira is Chad’s pick and it completely blew his mind as he watched it for the first time with his mouth hanging open. It’s not just the animation that still captures his attention. It’s also the excellent stories and characters, the relationships, and how it leaned into body horror during the confrontation between Kaneda and Tetsuo. There is so much going on that it’s a treat to sit down and watch it. Akira keeps getting better every time he experiences it.

Crystal also loves the characters and their relationships depicted in the oppressed society of Akira. Those psychic kids messed her up and the animation is great, but it’s really the story that makes it special. Bill prefers watching Akira in the original Japanese language with English subtitles, adding that this beautiful and influential film is an unrelenting and brutal bloodbath of a film in which no character is safe. Akira is the first anime Jeff’s seen with the exception of the original Astro Boy TV series (1963-1965) and he, too, is blown away. There seemed to be no top end as the story, color, and animation just kept ramping up. He’s so glad Chad chose this film.

In general, the 80s Grue Crew prefers the version with Japanese language and English subtitles, but it is difficult to take in the visual feast while reading subtitles. At the time of this writing, Akira is available to stream from Hulu, Funimation, and Tubi, and on physical media as a Blu-ray disc or 4K UHD from Funimation.

Every two weeks, Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1980s podcast will cover another horror film from the 1980s. The next episode’s film, chosen by Jeff, will be David Cronenberg’s Scanners (1981). You know… the one with the scene?

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans – so leave them a message or comment on the gruesome Magazine Youtube channel, on the website, or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Nov 14, 2022

“Eat shit and die, Ricky!” “Eat shit and live, Bill.” Yup. Sounds like your typical summer camp version of witty patter. Join your faithful Grue-Crew – Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, Crystal Cleveland, and Jeff Mohr  – as they finally cover the notorious Sleepaway Camp (1983).

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 219 – Sleepaway Camp (1983)

Join the Crew on the Gruesome Magazine YouTube channel!
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https://youtube.com/gruesomemagazine

Angela Baker, a shy, traumatized young girl, is sent to summer camp with her cousin. Shortly after her arrival, anyone with sinister or less-than-honorable intentions toward her gets their comeuppance.

 

Sleepaway Camp is one of Crystal’s favorite movies. In fact, she loves it right from the opening scene depicting a boating accident and describes the film as intentionally funny. She loves Desiree Gould as Angela’s Aunt Martha and the two camp snarks, Judy and Meg. She also issues the caveat that you shouldn’t watch it if you’re not open to some politically incorrect attempts at humor.

Chad differs from Crystal and does not think Sleepaway Camp is intended to be funny, but he does think it’s an okay slasher with good makeup effects. Bill went in with low expectations but was pleasantly surprised by Sleepaway Camp, calling it a slice of 80s cheese. Back in the day, Jeff heard the rumors about Sleepaway Camp and its shocking ending so he rented the video to verify it for himself, and indeed, the rumors were true. He was shocked. Now he enjoys the film, its appropriately juvenile humor, and its inventive kills.

It might go without saying but it will be said nonetheless. The 80s Grue Crew unanimously loves Felissa Rose. 

At the time of this writing, Sleepaway Camp can be streamed from Peacock and several ad-based services. A Blu-ray disc is available from Scream! Factory.

Every two weeks, Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1980s podcast will cover another horror film from the 1980s. The next episode’s film, chosen by Chad, will be Akira (1988), a “Japanese animated cyberpunk action film directed by Katsuhiro Otomo, … based on Otomo’s 1982 manga of the same name,” according to Wikipedia

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans – so leave them a message or comment on the gruesome Magazine Youtube channel, on the website, or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Oct 31, 2022

“Forget the cat, you hemorrhoid! Get the gun!” Yeah! Get your priorities straight! Join your faithful Grue-Crew – Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, Crystal Cleveland, and Jeff Mohr  – as they take in another portmanteau, especially for your Halloween viewing/listening pleasure, Stephen King’s Cat’s Eye (1985).

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 218 – Cat’s Eye (1985)

Join the Crew on the Gruesome Magazine YouTube channel!
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Synopsis: A stray cat attempting to find a little girl in trouble is the linking element of three tales of suspense and horror. In “Quitters, Inc.”: the cat is picked up by a shady New York City “doctor” who uses experimental techniques to get people to quit smoking. In “The Ledge”: the cat is picked up by a shady Atlantic City millionaire who forces his wife’s lover to participate in a terrifying bet. In “The General”: the cat arrives in Wilmington, North Carolina, where it is found by the young girl it has been sent to protect from an unbelievable threat.

 

If you’ve listened to even a few Decades of Horror 1980s episodes, you know that Bill is a very serious cat person, so it should come as no surprise that an anthology featuring a cat coming to the rescue is his choice for this episode. He liked Stephen King’s original short stories that makeup two of the three segments in Cat’s Eye, and as a mid-level Stephen King production, it holds up very well and he still enjoys it.

Crystal remembers loving Cat’s Eye as a kid and even looking up to Drew Barrymore. She remembers it being scarier through a kid’s eyes but in the end, it’s a feel-good movie with the cat finding his “forever home.” She agrees with Bill that the movie doesn’t seem dated at all and has held up very well. Jeff agrees with Crystal. To him, Cat’s Eye seems milder than he remembers, but he still enjoys it as an example of a well-shot movie with good storytelling and a great cast.

If you have a hankering to watch an anthology film, you won’t go wrong with Cat’s Eye. At the time of this writing, Cat’s Eye can be streamed from HBOmax, Tubi, and a host of PPV options. It is available on physical media as a Blu-ray from Warner Brothers.

For reviews of other Stephen King-based movies, check out these Decades of Horror podcasts:

Every two weeks, Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1980s podcast will cover another horror film from the 1980s. The next episode’s film, chosen by Crystal, will be Sleepaway Camp (1983). Yes, that one.

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans – so leave them a message or leave a comment on the gruesome Magazine Youtube channel, on the website, or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Oct 17, 2022

“I really liked your story, Frankie. I wish I was as weird as you.” You are. Trust us. Join your faithful Grue-Crew – Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, Crystal Cleveland, and Jeff Mohr  – as they travel to upstate New York on Halloween for this quirky independent ghost story, Lady in White (1988).

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 217 – Lady in White (1988)

Join the Crew on the Gruesome Magazine YouTube channel!
Subscribe today! And click the alert to get notified of new content!
https://youtube.com/gruesomemagazine

An author tells the story of how, as a young boy growing up in a 1960s small town, he was haunted after witnessing the murder of a little girl.

Lady in White is Jeff’s pick and he loves the family dynamics depicted in the film coupled with a ghost story that includes racism and a serial killer. Crystal sees traces of A Christmas Story (1983) in the use of a narrator and a young boy who sends away for a prized possession, this time a typewriter instead of a decoder ring. She also lauds future Oscar winner Russell Carpenter’s cinematography and the cast’s acting, singling out Lukas Haas for his cuteness factor. Finally, for her, the combination of child murders and racism coats Lady in White with a patina of sadness. 

Bill describes Lady in White as being good in a lot of ways but just missing the mark of being a great movie. Each element is fine by itself but the humor makes a weird mix in a film featuring a child-molesting serial killer. He also singles out Ernest Farino as a frequent provider of quality visual effects in independent films. It comes through, for Bill, that Lady in White is made by someone who loves the material and loves movies.

As of this writing, Lady in White is available to stream from Shudder. Unfortunately, the Scream Factory Blu-ray is currently out-of-print. 

Every two weeks, Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1980s podcast will cover another horror film from the 1980s. The next episode’s film, chosen by Bill, will be Stephen King’s Cat’s Eye (1985), an anthology film starring James Woods and Drew Barrymore, just in time for Halloween.

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans – so leave them a message or leave a comment on the gruesome Magazine Youtube channel, on the website, or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Oct 4, 2022

“It says here the body showed signs of cannibalism. … That’s what it says, Chief!” Exactly what are “signs of cannibalism,” Chief? Join your faithful Grue-Crew – Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, Crystal Cleveland, and Jeff Mohr  – as they investigate the “signs” in Antonio Margheriti’s Cannibal Apocalypse (1980), starring John Saxon.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 216 – Cannibal Apocalypse (1980)

Join the Crew on the Gruesome Magazine YouTube channel!
Subscribe today! And click the alert to get notified of new content!
https://youtube.com/gruesomemagazine

Mentally unstable Vietnam vets who were held captive by the Vietcong come back to America after being rescued carrying a dangerous virus that turns people into cannibals when bitten.

IMDb

 

Did you ever have one of those movies that you didn’t think you’d seen, but when you finally watched it, it turned out you already had? That’s the case for Chad and his pick for this episode, Cannibal Apocalypse, also known as Cannibals in the StreetsCannibal MassacreCannibals in the CityInvasion of the FleshhuntersSavage ApocalypseSavage SlaughterersThe SlaughterersApocalypse domani, and Asphalt-Kannibalen. With all those alternate titles, it’s easy to see how he might have been confused.

This time around, Chad points out that this allegory for Viet Nam veterans returning home has no one to root for. He’s a John Saxon fan and thinks he is the best thing about the movie, but he is perplexed by the film and the fact that it even exists.

Crystal loves John Saxon as well, especially his confused and shocked look when he sees his troops in the pit eating human flesh. The film is trying to be serious with a metaphor depicting PTSD as some type of contagious cannibalism but in the end, it doesn’t really know what it wants to be. And beware! There are triggers aplenty.

Bill generally appreciates director Margheriti’s work and can see why Quentin Tarantino likes him, but Cannibal Apocalypse feels to him like Margheriti wanted to make a Viet Nam movie but could only get money for a horror film and it turns out to be a bit of a mess. He does like the idea of war as a virus that comes home. Just because you’re no longer on the battlefield doesn’t mean you can escape it.

Margheriti’s The Long Hair of Death (1965) was covered in Decades of Horror: The Classic Era Episode 110 but Jeff sees few similarities between that and Cannibal Apocalypse. He loves Giannetto De Rossi’s special effects and of course, John Saxon’s performance, but also gives a trigger warning for several scenes.

At the time of this writing,  Cannibal Apocalypse is available to stream from Tubi and on physical media as a Blu-ray from Kino Lorber.

Every two weeks, Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1980s podcast will cover another horror film from the 1980s. The next episode’s film, chosen by Jeff, will be Lady in White (1988), a serial killer/ghost story starring Lukas Haas.

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the gruesome Magazine Youtube channel, on the website or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

 

Sep 19, 2022

“I am Ergo, the magnificent. Short in stature, tall in power, narrow of purpose, and wide of vision. And I do not travel with peasants and beggars. Goodbye!” No brag, just fact. Join your faithful Grue-Crew – Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, Crystal Cleveland, and Jeff Mohr  – as they check out the epic quest depicted in Krull (1983).

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 215 – Krull (1983)

Join the Crew on the Gruesome Magazine YouTube channel!
Subscribe today! And click the alert to get notified of new content!
https://youtube.com/gruesomemagazine

A prince and a fellowship of companions set out to rescue his bride from a fortress of alien invaders who have arrived on their home planet.

 

Crystal has always been a fan of fantasy and has loved Krull since her childhood so it’s not surprising that this is her pick. In fact, she always wanted to be Lyssa. She also loves the handsome and oh-so-precious lead and the costumes, and when she first saw the film, she was afraid of the Widow of the Web.

Steven Archer’s stop motion animation of the crystal spider is Bill’s favorite part of Krull. Well, that and the cyclops. He’s disappointed in the way the Beast is shot, especially after learning of all that went into its design. And, of course, you’ve got to love the glaive, a very stupid yet very cool weapon.

Chad is a big fan of sword and sorcery, and distinctive weapons so Krull is one of his favorites. He is particularly impressed with the cyclops, the beast, and some of the sets with their feel of German expressionism. He does, however, view it as being incohesive with a lot of the story that doesn’t make sense. Jeff describes Krull as a beautiful movie with its sets, locations, production design, and costumes, He also gives a special nod to Freddie Jones for the added gravitas he gives the film.

If you are hungering for some glaive-work or an 80s, sword and sorcery, quest movie with horrific elements (did we forget to mention the changelings?), Krull is just the ticket. At the time of this writing, Krull is available for streaming from HBOmax and various PPV options. As far as physical media, Krull is currently available as a Sony Pictures Home Entertainment Blu-ray.

Every two weeks, Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1980s podcast will cover another horror film from the 1980s. The next episode’s film, chosen by Chad, will be Cannibal Apocalypse (1983), directed by Antonio Margheriti and starring John Saxon! Or is it Cannibals in the Streets? Or Apocalypse domani? Or Invasion of the Fleshhunters? Or Cannibal Massacre? Or… well, you get the picture.

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the gruesome Magazine Youtube channel, on the website or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

Sep 5, 2022

‘Brundle stole my girl, your mother. Got her pregnant. Caused her death. Dissolved my hand and my foot with fly vomit! I had no love for the man. He “bugged” me!’ Doesn’t he know when life gives you lemons you should make lemonade? Sheesh. Join your faithful Grue-Crew – Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, Crystal Cleveland, and Jeff Mohr  – as they check out The Fly II (1989), the worthy sequel to David Cronenberg’s The Fly.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 214 – The Fly II (1989)

Join the Crew on the Gruesome Magazine YouTube channel!
Subscribe today! And click the alert to get notified of new content!
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The almost-human son of “Brundlefly” searches for a cure to his mutated genes while being monitored by a nefarious corporation that wishes to continue his father’s experiments.

IMDb

 

The Fly II ain’t no slouch, even when compared to David Cronenberg’s The Fly (1986). This one is Bill’s pick and to his mind, even though The Fly II doesn’t have Cronenberg, effects guru Chris Walas does an excellent job directing his first film. It has a number of high points, including a really monstrous monster.

Chad is glad they didn’t try to redo The Fly, taking The Fly II in a different direction and letting it tell its own story while carrying on themes from the first movie, thanks to writing from Frank Darabont. He loves the effects and the insane gore and almost always goes on to watch The Fly II whenever he watches The Fly.

Crystal likes The Fly II almost as much as The Fly because there are clear antagonists that get what they deserve. She loves the music and the crazy effects of this real and true sequel. She also identifies Eric Stoltz as a phenomenal actor. The Fly II is far better than Jeff remembers it being. He specifically calls out the cast, the story, the original creature, and the practical effects.

If you haven’t seen The Fly II in a while, it’s time to check it out again. While you’re at it, make it a double feature with The Fly and throw in another listen to THE FLY (1986) — Episode 91 — Decades Of Horror 1980s. At the time of this writing, The Fly II is available to stream from HBOmax and as physical media on one of five Blu-ray discs included in Scream Factory’s The Fly Collection. Also included in The Fly Collection are The Fly (1958), Return of the Fly (1959), Curse of the Fly (1965), and The Fly (1986).

Every two weeks, Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1980s podcast will cover another horror film from the 1980s. The next episode’s film, chosen by Crystal, will be Krull (1983)! You asked for it!

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the gruesome Magazine Youtube channel, on the website or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

Aug 22, 2022

“What… the eff was that?” That’s a very good question! Join your faithful Grue-Crew – Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr  – as they check out this legendary low-budget film with big-budget effects, The Deadly Spawn (1983).

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 213 – The Deadly Spawn (1983)

Join the Crew on the Gruesome Magazine YouTube channel!
Subscribe today! And click the alert to get notified of new content!
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Alien creatures invade a small town and four teenagers, along with a young boy, attempt to escape from them.

IMDb

 

The Deadly Spawn is Jeff’s pick by way of Doc Rotten. For him, this movie is balls out once the title characters appear. Charles, the film’s monster kid, saves the day while everyone else flounders. He loves the scene with the women’s group, the head removals, and the body thrown out the upstairs window.

Chad first heard of The Deadly Spawn in Fangoria, but it never seemed to be available for him to view it. He finally got it on DVD and holy cow, he loves this movie. The creature is absolutely bonkers and with characters that are interesting, the movie is a fun-as-hell, crazy romp. Crystal can’t believe how low-budget The Deadly Spawn is and how good the acting and the special effects are. Bill also first heard of The Deadly Spawn in Fangoria but assumed it would be one of those movies where the monster looked good in the stills but not so good in the movie. Instead, he found a really good, practically iconic creature feature. It’s hard to believe the budget is so low and yet the monster is better than those in some pictures from Holywood with much bigger budgets.

If you haven’t seen this legendary film, the 80s Grue-Crew command that you do. As of this writing, The Deadly Spawn is streaming from Shudder and is available on DVD from Synapse Films.

Every two weeks, Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1980s podcast will cover another horror film from the 1980s. The next episode’s film, chosen by Bill, will be The Fly II (1989) with Eric Stoltz and Daphne Zuniga and directed by Chris Walas.

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the gruesome Magazine Youtube channel, on the website or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

Aug 8, 2022

“You see my dear, immortality exacts a handsome price. Both for those who must claim it and those who must pave the way.” Seems like a simple equation. Join your faithful Grue-Crew – Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr  – as they check out Tom Savini as the ripper in this straight-to-video effort, The Ripper (1985).

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 212 – The Ripper (1985)

Join the Crew on the Gruesome Magazine YouTube channel!
Subscribe today! And click the alert to get notified of new content!
https://youtube.com/gruesomemagazine

An old antique ring turns a college professor into a homicidal maniac when he puts it on. The ring originally belonged to Jack the Ripper, and the Ripper’s spirit possesses whoever wears it.

The Ripper caught Chad’s eye as it had many times on the video rental store shelf, but this time he went for it. The verdict? He’s never seen such a long, drawn-out movie where entire scenes were of no use and were stretched out for no reason. He chose this movie for the 80s Grue Crew because of the presence of Tom Savini, who plays the title character, but he wasn’t enough to outweigh the bad.

Bill also loves Tom Savini, but not this film in which even the padding is padded and long dialogue scenes go nowhere. On the plus side, the effects work is fairly well done for lowbudget gore. Agreeing with Chad and Bill, Jeff describes the script as mundane with very bad jokes. He likes the general idea of the story but the execution needed to capitalize on that idea is missing from The Ripper.

If you’re a Savini completist or just want to see what the 80s Grue Crew is talking about, at the time of this writing, The Ripper can be streamed from Tubi and Screambox.

Every two weeks, Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1980s podcast will cover another horror film from the 1980s. The next episode’s film, chosen by Jeff, will be The Deadly Spawn (1983), filmed in artist Tim Hildebrandt’s house and featuring the effects of John Dods!

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the gruesome Magazine Youtube channel, on the website or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

Jul 25, 2022

“By pick, by axe, by sword, bye-bye!” They forgot by pitchfork, by gaff hook, and by pointy coat hooks. Join your faithful Grue-Crew – Chad Hunt, Crystal Cleveland, and Jeff Mohr  – as they check out the mutilations in The Mutilator (1984).

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 211 – The Mutilator (1984)

Join the Crew on the Gruesome Magazine YouTube channel!
Subscribe today! And click the alert to get notified of new content!
https://youtube.com/gruesomemagazine

A college student, who accidentally killed his mother as a child, decides to take his friends to his father’s fishing cabin during fall break, not knowing that his crazed father is stalking the place.

 

Crystal chose The Mutilator when she saw that a sequel had just wrapped filming and is scheduled for a September 2022 release. According to her, this is not a case of so-bad-it’s-good, it’s just bad. It’s strange and weird and there are no surprises in the story. On the plus side, there is some decent gore.

Chad views The Mutilator as a cross between a Mentos commercial and Growing Pains (TV Series, 1985-1992). In other words, it’s not good. He’s also puzzled by the lead not being bothered at all by the deaths of friends. However, it’s great to see some of Mark Shostrum’s early effects work and there are some creative kills. The actors in The Mutilator give it the old college try with their attempts at campy humor but they are not supported in their efforts by the script, according to Jeff. For him, the only positive is Mark Shostrum’s effects work.

To summarize, your 80s Grue-Crew is none too enamored with The Mutilator, but if you’re a Mark Shostrum fan or want to prepare for the sequel’s release, you might still want to check it out. As of this writing, The Mutilator is available to stream free with ads from Tubi and from multiple subscription services, including Shudder and Arrow. In terms of physical media, The Mutilator (2-Disc Special Edition) [Blu-ray + DVD ] is available from Arrow Video.

Every two weeks, Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1980s podcast will cover another horror film from the 1980s. The next episode’s film, chosen by Chad, will be The Ripper (1985) “starring” Tom Savini!

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the gruesome Magazine Youtube channel, on the website or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

Jul 11, 2022

“Release the Kraken!” Chad does his best impression of James Mason doing Laurence Olivier in recreating that iconic command. Join your faithful Grue-Crew – Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, Crystal Cleveland, and Jeff Mohr  – as they get pretty wound up discussing Ray Harryhausen’s last feature film, Clash of the Titans (1981).

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 210 – Clash of the Titans (1981)

Join the Crew on the Gruesome Magazine YouTube channel!
Subscribe today! And click the alert to get notified of new content!
https://youtube.com/gruesomemagazine

Perseus must battle Medusa and the Kraken to save Princess Andromeda.

 

Ray Harryhausen is the reason Bill is involved in filmmaking, so it makes sense that Clash of the Titans is his choice for the 80s Grue-Crew. He looks in wonder at the brilliant-in-every-way Medusa sequence and voices his appreciation for how producer Charles Schneer enabled Harryhausen to make the movies he did.

Chad was bored out of his mind during the first half of Clash of the Titans but it picked up for him once the journeys and quests begin. The scenes with Medusa are thick with tension, the witches and Calibos are amazing, and he always loves Burgess Meredith. Even though Clash of the Titans is pretty bad in some places, Crystal loves it wholeheartedly. She sees it as an awesome epic with just enough whimsy to balance the scares. And, oh yeah, Medusa! For Jeff, there are opportunities with the back and forth manipulations between the gods to energize the first half of Clash of the Titans, but they aren’t put to good use. He is all aboard with the Medusa appreciation, calling it one of the quintessential stop motion sequences in movies.

The 80s Grue-Crew are universally pleased that Harryhausen was able to go out on a high note with a bigger budget film. At the time of this writing, Clash of the Titans is available to stream from HBOmax and multiple PPV, and on physical media as a Warner Brothers Blu-ray. 

If you are interested in more of Ray Harryhausen’s work, check out the following Decades of horror episodes:

Every two weeks, Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1980s podcast will cover another horror film from the 1980s. The next episode’s film, chosen by Crystal, will be The Mutlilator (1984). Oh-oh.

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the gruesome Magazine Youtube channel, on the website or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

Jun 27, 2022

“Why do you keep telling me to go on with those pills? I feel fine. I never felt better! My nerves are fine the way they are!” If you moved into a house in the middle of a cemetery with an actual tomb inside the house, and it was the site of a murder-suicide, your nerves might be shot too. Join your faithful Grue-Crew – Bill Mulligan, Crystal Cleveland, and Jeff Mohr  – as they check out the final entry in Lucio Fulci’s Gates of Hell Trilogy, The House by the Cemetery (1981).

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 209 – The House by the Cemetery (1981)

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A New England home is terrorized by a series of murders, unbeknownst to the guests that a gruesome secret is hiding in the basement.

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The House by the Cemetery, aka Quella villa accanto al cimitero (original title), is Jeff’s pick and he loves it. Despite the weird voice dubbed for Bob, the young boy in the story, he digs the atmospheric music, the long-drawn-out kill scenes, and what turns out to be a fairly coherent story, at least for a Fulci film. Crystal also loves The House by the Cemetery. Besides having maggots, gruesome kills, a weird story, and a creepy kid, it’s very well shot. 

The little boy is not cute, according to Bill, and he too describes the horrible voice dubbing of said boy. Though The House by the Cemetery is not his favorite of the trilogy, he still thinks it’s pretty cool. Despite the frequent scenes of characters walking around the house calling out names, it is pretty to look at and really well made.

The Decades of Horror Grue Crews always have something to say about Lucio Fulci’s work. Here are the Decades of Horror episodes discussing Fulci’s work:

As of this writing, The House by the Cemetery is available to stream from Shudder. In terms of physical media, Blu-ray and 4K Ultra HD discs from Blue Underground are available.

Every two weeks, Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1980s podcast will cover another horror film from the 1980s. The next episode’s film, chosen by Bill, will be Clash of the Titans (1981) with a stellar cast and, of course, the magic of Ray Harryhausen!

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the gruesome Magazine Youtube channel, on the website or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

May 30, 2022

“You know, I mostly get your basic dorks around here. They seem to gravitate toward me… I don’t know why!” Hmmm. Guys go to a strip joint looking for a stripper and find vampires? May the dork be with you. Join your faithful Grue-Crew – Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, Crystal Cleveland, and Jeff Mohr  – as they check out the force of nature known as Grace Jones in Vamp (1986).

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 207 – Vamp (1986)

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Two fraternity pledges travel to a sleazy bar in search of a stripper for their college friends, unaware it is occupied by vampires.

 

Crystal is a big Grace Jones fan so it’s no surprise that Vamp is Crystal’s pick. She has such a good time laughing along with this movie that she enjoys it just as much, maybe more, watching as an adult.  She describes Grace Jones as a work of art in Vamp and gives Gedde Watanabe a big thumbs up for his performance.

Chad’s view of Vamp is that if you love cheesy, 80s horror, there’s not much to criticize. There’s a lot of silly 80s stuff, but it’s good silly 80s stuff. He loves Robert Rusler, Chris Makepeace, Grace Jones, and, of course, the vampires! Vamp is an odd little, very 80s film according to Bill and he likes the Nosferatu-like vampires. Grace Jones has such a [resence and her dance is iconic. Jeff is also in awe of the performance given by Grace Jones and is impressed with the effects work. To his surprise, he kind of got into the college-guy humor in Vamp.

The 80s Grue-Crew universally enjoys Vamp!  If you hear anything that sparks your interest, Vamp is currently available to stream from Tubi (free w/ads) as well as a variety of subscription and PPV options. If physical media is your thing, Vamp is available as a Special Edition [Blu-ray] from Arrow Video and as a Blu-ray from Image Entertainment. That’s all “as of this writing,” of course.

Every two weeks, Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1980s podcast will cover another horror film from the 1980s. The next episode’s film, chosen by Chad will be Evil Dead Trap (1988), a no-holds-barred journey into J-horror courtesy of Toshiharu Ikeda.

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the gruesome Magazine Youtube channel, on the website or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

May 16, 2022

“I mean, in a sense, we’re all vampires.” Everyone is draining the life out of everyone else in one way or another? Hmmm, that’s a dark take, but a fair point. Join your faithful Grue-Crew – Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, Crystal Cleveland, and Jeff Mohr  – as they drain everything possible from Tobe Hooper’s Lifeforce (1985).

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 206 – Lifeforce (1985) Join the Crew on the Gruesome Magazine YouTube channel!
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A race of space vampires arrives in London and infects the populace, beginning an apocalyptic descent into chaos.

Lifeforce is the first of three films Tobe Hooper made with Cannon, followed by Invaders From Mars (1986) and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986). As Bill’s pick, it’s a film he frequently revisits trying to understand the choices made during its making. He’s always liked the film, even while feeling a bit baffled. Chad first read about Lifeforce in Fangoria. He loved how crazy and wild it was when he first saw it and he still does. Chad’s never quite sure what he thinks of Steve Railsback’s performance because to him, he’ll always be the Charles Manson he portrayed in Helter Skelter (1976). The excellent practical and visual effects are what pull Jeff into this movie. 

All three of this episode’s Grue-Crew compare Lifeforce to the feel of Hammer’s Quatermass and the Pit (1967) and indeed, may have been a better picture if Hooper had gone full-Quatermass. And of course, they all agree that Mathilda May is phenomenal at portraying the female vampire with style and grace while spending nearly the entire film unabashedly nude.

For other Decades of Horror discussions of Tobe Hooper films (and Quatermass and the Pit to boot), checkout the following episodes:

If you so desire, at the time of this writing, you can stream Lifeforce from Tubi and PlutoTV with ads, or from various PPV streaming services. If physical media is what trips your trigger, Lifeforce (Collector’s Edition) (4K UHD) is scheduled for release May 24, 2022 from Scream Factory. And let’s face it, it’s always time to revisit Tobe Hooper’s films.

Every two weeks, Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1980s podcast will cover another horror film from the 1980s. The next episode’s film, chosen by Crystal will be Vamp (1986), featuring a speechless Grace Jones. 

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the gruesome Magazine Youtube channel, on the website or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

May 2, 2022
“He was my patient for fifteen years. He became an obsession with me until I realized that there was nothing within him, neither conscious nor reason that was… even remotely human. An hour ago, I stood up and fired six shots into him, and then, he just got up and walked away. ” He shot him! Six times! …or was it seven? Join your faithful Grue-Crew – Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, Crystal Cleveland, and Jeff Mohr  – as they count the shots The Shape takes from Dr. Loomis in Halloween II (1981).

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 205 – Halloween II (1981)

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While Dr. Loomis hunts for Michael Myers, a traumatized Laurie is rushed to Haddonfield Memorial Hospital, and The Shape is not far behind her.

Halloween II, the sometimes denigrated sequel to the original, is Jeff’s pick. The film picks up right where Halloween (1978) left off but with much more of an 80s slasher feel than the first entry in the franchise. Jeff laments the “apparent” loss of Dr. Loomis and thinks Laurie Strode is more of a target than an active participant. Crystal advises viewers that if they watch Halloween II without thinking too much, they’ll have a good time. She doesn’t care one way or the other about the reveal that Laurie is Michael’s sister and points out Michael’s move into the realm of the supernatural with his ability to survive umpteen point-blank gunshots.

Chad is glad Halloween II is different from the first entry in the franchise. To his mind, it would have failed if the filmmakers had tried to copy John Carpenter’s seminal work. He agrees that the filmmakers beefed up the gore and the violence to compete with early 80s slashers. He liked it coming out of the theater in 1981 and he still likes it. Though admittedly not fond of the Halloween franchise, Bill enjoys Halloween II more now than when he first saw it. He still doesn’t care for the Laurie-is-Michael’s-sister twist, pointing out that the idea doesn’t really go anywhere in this specific movie.

Collectively, your 1980s Grue-Crew enjoy Halloween II and though admitting it doesn’t reach the heights of its predecessor, give it a hearty recommendation. Hey! It’s Halloween! At the time of this writing, Halloween II can be streamed from Shudder and Tubi (w/ads) and is available on physical media as a SHOUT! Factory Collector’s Edition [4K UHD] and on Blu-ray as a stand-alone or in a variety of box set combinations from multiple companies.

For more Halloween franchise-related podcasts, check out these episodes from the Gruesome Magazine family of podcasts:

Every two weeks, Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1980s podcast will cover another horror film from the 1980s. The next episode’s film, chosen by Bill will be Tobe Hooper’s Lifeforce (1985). 

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the gruesome Magazine Youtube channel, on the website or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

Apr 20, 2022

“One tiny little hole in a fucking toe of his suit, man. No bigger than your dick. Yeah, the way the ocean came in, the pressure just crammed his whole body up into his helmet in a matter of seconds. We just buried his helmet.” Too much information? Yeah, thought so. Join your faithful Grue-Crew – Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, Crystal Cleveland, and Jeff Mohr  – as they take a deep sea dive with Leviathan (1989), one of the many underwater-monster-themed films released during 1989-90.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 204 – Leviathan (1989)

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Perched on the hull of a wrecked Soviet freighter, a team of deep-sea miners led by head oceanographer Steven Beck comes face to face with a mutant creature that’s the product of a failed genetic experiment.

IMDb

 

Chad is a natural-born monster kid from way back so it’s not surprising that Leviathan is his pick. Even though it’s obviously derivative of several other SF-horror films, he still enjoys it. He loves the comedic moments and doesn’t get enough of the nasty, icky, gooey, and creepy Stan Winston Studios-designed creature. 

Crystal liked Leviathan when she first saw it and she still likes it, for telling a compelling story that makes sense, for its effects work, and for its phenomenal cast, especially Peter Weller. On the other hand, Bill thinks Leviathan is a little too formulaic, holding very few surprises. Even though all the parts are there for an excellent movie — writers, directors, cast, cinematographer, and effects — it seems like there is something missing. Jeff had a fun time with Leviathan and he, too, loves the cast. He has no trouble believing they had spent six months together at 16,000 feet beneath the ocean’s surface. A dash of Alien, a pinch of The Thing, and a smidgen of The Fly all added to the fun for him.

If you’re pining for a sea monster movie, Leviathan is a fun ride. As of this writing,  Leviathan is currently available to stream free with ads from Tubi & PlutoTV and on a variety of subscription and PPV streaming services.

Every two weeks, Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1980s podcast will cover another horror film from the 1980s. The next episode’s film, chosen by Jeff will be Halloween II (1981). Spend mid-Halloween’s Eve with Laurie, Michael, Dr. “I shot him six times!” Loomis, and the gang for this fiery treat.

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the gruesome Magazine Youtube channel, on the website or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

Apr 6, 2022
“For it is written: the inhabitants of the Earth have been made drunk with her blood. …” Well, if it’s written, I guess it must be the real deal. Join your faithful Grue-Crew – Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, Crystal Cleveland, and Jeff Mohr  – as they boldly venture to the Dark Country to get a gander at Christopher Lee and Sybil Danning in Howling II: Your Sister Is a Werewolf (1985).

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 203 – Howling II: Your Sister Is a Werewolf (1985)

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A man discovers that his sister was a werewolf, and helps an investigator track down a gang of the monsters through the United States and eastern Europe.

 

Howling II: Your Sister is a Werewolf is Crystal’s pick so obviously, this movie is awesome! She gets a kick from the werewolf orgy and the hot girls, and, of course, Christopher Lee looks awesome in his new wave sunglasses and his clubbing outfit. She even finds herself frequently singing the theme song.

On the other hand, Chad hates Howling II, with the exception of Christopher Lee. He just can’t get past the beginning of the movie which presents itself as a direct story sequel to The Howling (1981). Otherwise, he might be able to appreciate it as a trashy B-movie. Bill doesn’t love it near as much as Chad does, describing Howling II as failing on every level. In his view, the street puppets are scarier than any of the werewolves. Jeff had managed to avoid Howling II… until now. He laments the lack of consistency in the look of the werewolves and hated the cheesy re-creation of Dee Wallace’s character’s death from The Howling.

If you’re a fan of Howling II: Your Sister is a Werewolf like Crystal is, rejoice! At the time of this writing, the film is available to stream with ads from Tubi and PPV from iTunes.

For more adventures in lycanthropy, check out these other Decades of Horror episodes:

Every two weeks, Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1980s podcast will cover another horror film from the 1980s. The next episode’s film, chosen by Chad, will be Leviathan (1989), starring Peter Weller, Richard Crenna, Amanda Pays, Daniel Stern, Lisa Eilbacher, Michael Carmine, Meg Foster, Ernie Hudson, and Hector Elizondo.

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the gruesome Magazine Youtube channel, on the website or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

Mar 24, 2022
“Mm, I see. So, Jane, what you do here, in effect, is count boners.” Will one hand be enough? You know. The fingers. Will the fingers on one hand be enough for counting? Join your faithful Grue-Crew – Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, Crystal Cleveland, and Jeff Mohr  – as they dream a little dream with you and the star-packed cast in Dreamscape (1984).

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 202 – Dreamscape (1984)

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A man who can enter and manipulate people’s dreams is recruited by a government agency to help cure the President of the United States of his nightmares about nuclear war but stumbles upon an assassination plot

Dreamscape is a Decades of Horror 1980s double-tap, first covered in episode 100 by Doc Rotten, Christopher G. Moore, and Thomas Mariani. This time around, Dreamscape is Bill’s pick and he was sucked in by the glowing nunchucks in ads. Although the cast is great, it doesn’t hold up as much as Bill wishes it did and it is far too obvious who the bad guys are.  Having said that, it is still a very 80s movie and he would like to see it remade.

Chad thought Dreamscape was great at the time and he still enjoys it even though not everything holds up. In his view, it was hard to pull off everything they were trying to incorporate with the budget they had to work with it. On the other hand, Crystal thinks Dreamscape holds up just fine and she rewatches frequently. Even so, she too would like to see it remade. Jeff still really, really likes it and loves the melding of stop motion animation and other practical effects. He doesn’t appreciate Dennis Quaid’s girl-killer smile but otherwise thinks the cast is incredible.

Regardless of whether or not you’re in the “holds up” or “doesn’t hold up” camps, Dreamscape is a fun 80s flick that tries hard to be a lot of things. At the time of this writing, it’s available to stream from Tubi and Kanopy, and on physical media as a Collector’s Edition Blu-ray from Shout Factory. 

Every two weeks, Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1980s podcast will cover another horror film from the 1980s. The next episode’s film, chosen by Crystal, will be Howling II: … Your Sister Is a Werewolf (1985), also known as Howling II: Stirba – Werewolf Bitch. Discussing this masterpiece should be howling good fun. …sorry.

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the gruesome Magazine Youtube channel, on the website or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

Mar 7, 2022

“It's not you, Ferdy. I'm just not used to being chased around a mall in the middle of the night by killer robots.” Don’t worry. It won’t last long. Join your faithful Grue-Crew - Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, Crystal Cleveland, and Jeff Mohr  - as they head right back to a very familiar mall in Chopping Mall (1986).

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 201 – Chopping Mall (1986)

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A group of young shopping mall employees stays behind for a late-night party in one of the stores. When the mall goes on lock-down before they can get out, the robot security system malfunctions, and goes on a killing spree.

IMDb

 

Jeff chose Chopping Mall based on connections to the 80s Grue-Crew’s last two episodes, namely Barbara Crampton, Kelli Maroney, Mary Woronov, and the Sherman Oaks Galleria. For him, the cast and the shout-outs to other horror movies are the best parts of Chopping Mall. Even though there’s no “chopping” taking place, it’s a fun flick.

Androids are more Crystal’s thing than killbots, but she still enjoys this entertaining movie. Does it go without saying that Barbara Crampton and Kelli Maroney are really cute in Chopping Mall? Yes, but it needs saying anyway and Crystal obliges. Chad likes the references and nods to other movies and the exploding head kill. In the end, he calls Chopping Mall pure Jim Wynorski cheese. Limburger cheese. After pausing for a discussion about Limburger cheese, Bill reveals that he doesn’t find the kind of robots found in Chopping Mall to be very scary. That being said, the film has a following and a lot of people have a kind of nostalgic fondness for it. And he loves the cameos by folks like Mary Woronov, Paul Bartel, Dick Miller, Mel Welles, and Gerrit Graham.

If you haven’t seen Chopping Mall for a while or you’re a big Chopping Mall fan, now might be a good time to make another trip to the mall. As of this writing, Chopping Mall is available to stream on Shudder and a variety of other subscription services or free streaming services with ads. It’s also available on physical media as a Collector’s Edition Blu-ray from Vestron/Lionsgate.

Every two weeks, Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1980s podcast will cover another horror film from the 1980s. The next episode’s film, chosen by Bill, will be Dreamscape (1984). Welcome to their nightmare!

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the gruesome Magazine Youtube channel, on the website or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

Feb 7, 2022

“Well, how about the hard-on I got? Is there a statistical correlation for that too?” Will you calculate the standard deviation while you’re at it? Join your faithful Grue-Crew - Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, Crystal Cleveland, and Jeff Mohr, along with special guest Ralph Miller - as they take a goo-filled trip to From Beyond (1986)!

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 199 – From Beyond (1986)

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A group of scientists have developed the Resonator, a machine which allows whoever is within range to see beyond normal perceptible reality. But when the experiment succeeds, they are immediately attacked by terrible life forms.

IMDb

 

From Beyond is Chad’s pick and the first time he saw it, he was flabbergasted by the special effects, the gore, and the goo! He still loves it today, adding that the pacing delivers one flabbergast right after another and the acting - Barbara Crampton, Jeffrey Combs, and Ken Foree - is great. Bill loves the great cast and the practical effects of From Beyond but laments how the color scheme hid some of the details of the monsters. In case you haven’t realized it by now, Crystal has a definite thing for Jeffrey Combs and Barbara Crampton. She also loves From Beyond’s memorable effects and the way the body horror progresses throughout the movie, becoming more and more gruesome. Jeff loves From Beyond too, agreeing with everyone on the excellence of the effects and the cast. Ralph, who worked on the “shrimp monster’s” animatronics for John Buechler’s MMI, loves Barabara Crampton’s impressive performance portraying her character’s arc. Ralph admits he’s a creature person and loves the creature designs as the special effects units do their best to materialize Lovecraft’s imaginings in From Beyond.  

Stuart Gordon, H.P. Lovecraft, Dennis Paoli, Brian Yuzna, Barbara Crampton, Jeffrey Combs, Ken Foree, Ted Sorel, and some of the best effects this side of The Thing! So what are you waiting for? As of this writing, From Beyond is available to stream from Tubi and PlutoTV and as PPV on Amazon and Vudu. 

This episode is a “double-tap” for From Beyond. Check out a previous 1980s Grue-Crew discussion on the film at Episode 129 of Decades Of Horror 1980s, 28 January 2018.

You can also check out our partial career overview of Ralph Miller’s special effects work in Episode 155 – Decades Of Horror 1980s, 7 May 2020

Every two weeks, Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1980s podcast will cover another horror film from the 1980s. Next up is the podcast's landmark 200th episode. The subject film has been chosen by our listeners and viewers in polls on Patreon, YouTube, and Facebook, and will be Night of the Comet (1984)! You won’t want to miss the Decades of Horror 1980s Grue-Crew’s discussion of the film whose working title was Teenage Mutant Horror Comet Zombies. What else could you ask for from an 80s horror flick?

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the gruesome Magazine Youtube channel, on the website or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

Jan 24, 2022

“It's almost time, kids. The clock is ticking. Be in front of your TV sets for the Horrorthon, followed by the Big Giveaway. Don't miss it. And don't forget to wear your masks. The clock is ticking. It's almost time.” Everybody sing! Three more days to Halloween, Halloween, Halloween … Join your faithful Grue-Crew - Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, Crystal Cleveland, and Jeff Mohr  - as they give evidence to their belief that every day is Halloween by covering Halloween III: Season of the Witch (1982) in January.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 198 – Halloween III: Season of the Witch (1982)

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Kids all over America want Silver Shamrock masks for Halloween. Doctor Daniel Challis seeks to uncover a plot by Silver Shamrock owner Conal Cochran.

IMDb

 

Halloween III: Season of the Witch is Crystal’s pick and it has always been her favorite of all of the followups to the original Halloween (1978) and loves it just as much today as the first time she saw it. Those who know Crystal know she has a thing for androids and that goes for Tom Atkins and Dan O’Herlihy as well. Chad is really into this “no Michael Myers” concept of Halloween III and an anthology-like series of Halloween movies. He loved H3 the first time he saw it and he loves it still. For Bill, there’s a huge dropoff in the sequels to Halloween (1978). As for H3, he had to get over the “no Michael Myers” hump, and even though the story makes no sense, he now enjoys it more each time he sees it. H3’s 14-time repetition of its famous jingle annoyed Jeff to no end when he first saw the movie. But like Bill, he now enjoys the film and even the jingle.

Halloween III: Season of the Witch gets a universal thumbs-up from your 1980s Grue-Crew! If you haven’t seen it for a while, or if it previously left a bad taste in your mouth, it might be time to check it out again. After all, it’s only 280 days to Halloween, Halloween, Halloween…

At the time of this writing, Halloween III: Season of the Witch is available for streaming on multiple PPV services and on physical media as a 4K UHD Collector’s Edition from Shout! Factory.

Every two weeks, Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1980s podcast will cover another horror film from the 1980s. The next episode’s film, chosen by Chad, will be From Beyond (1986). Lovecraft, Gordon, Crampton, and Combs for episode 199!

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the gruesome Magazine Youtube channel, on the website or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

Jan 10, 2022

“All we need is a little order around here.” And Jerry Blake is just the guy to make that happen! Join your faithful Grue-Crew - Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr along with Vanessa Thompson -  as they revel in Terry O’Quinn’s stellar performance in The Stepfather (1987).

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 197 – The Stepfather (1987)

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After murdering his entire family, a man marries a widow with a teenage daughter in another town and prepares to do it all over again.

 

The Stepfather is Bill’s pick and he is still super impressed by Terry O’Quinn’s performance in the title role, a character who is one step ahead of every other character in the film. What makes it even more chilling for Bill is that the story could really happen and indeed, it did. Chad is also wowed by O’Quinn’s performance which includes everything from subtle touches to all-out, over-the-top insanity. Crystal wasn’t available for this episode but Decades of Horror 1980s alumnus, Vanessa, stepped up to participate. She loves the opening scene and recognizes O’Quinn’s fantastic, unhinged performance as the driving force in The Stepfather, a film that is very uncomfortable to watch and puts the viewer on edge in a subtle way. Much to Jeff’s liking, The Stepfather puts its big reveal in the opening scene, leaving the audience in suspense while the other characters are unsuspecting of the potential violence and evil they are facing. Of course, he, too, loves the nuances and outright insanity of O’Quinn’s performance.

The Decades of Horror 1980s Grue-Crew are universally impressed with The Stepfather and highly recommend a watch, whether for the first time or a rewatch. As of this writing, The Stepfather is available for streaming from Shudder, Kanopy, and Peacock as well as other streaming services, and on physical media as a Blu-ray from Shout! Factory.

Every two weeks, Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1980s podcast will cover another horror film from the 1980s. The next episode’s film, chosen by Crystal, will be Halloween III: Season of the Witch (1982).  

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the gruesome Magazine Youtube channel, on the website or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

Dec 28, 2021

“I think this place is possessed by demonic demons.” “Your head's going to be possessed by the butt of this gun if you don't shut up.” Sounds like a typical conversation while hunting demonic scarecrows in the dark. Join your faithful Grue-Crew – Crystal Cleveland, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr – as they check out Scarecrows (1988), a movie that saw a limited theatrical release in one theater… in Des Moines, Iowa.

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 196 – Scarecrows (1988)

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Criminals hijack a plane and force the pilot and his daughter to fly them to Mexico. However, an unexpected landing finds them in a cemetery inhabited by killer scarecrows.

IMDb

 

Scarecrows is Jeff’s pick. He just couldn’t resist a movie released only in Des Moines and, as it turns out, he kind of likes it, especially the effects and the nighttime camera work. It’s better than Bill thought it was going to be even though there’s no real explanation for the supernatural occurrences except… occult! He describes Scarecrows as fairly well made and technically sound with good effects work. Chad, too, is pleasantly surprised with Scarecrows. He felt like he was transported back to a theater in the 80s watching a cheesy movie with outstanding makeup effects.

If you’re up for a trip out to the country for an encounter with a supernatural pickup and possessed scarecrows, as of this writing, Scarecrows is available to stream on Amazon Prime. Unfortunately, the 2015 Shout Factory Blu-ray is out-of-print.

Every two weeks, Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1980s podcast will cover another horror film from the 1980s. The next episode’s film, chosen by Bill, will be The Stepfather (1987) starring Terry O’Quinn. Nothing says psychotic family member like the holidays.

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the gruesome Magazine Youtube channel, on the website or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

Dec 13, 2021

“Now let me get this straight. You're telling me that these, these things are inside the Golden Gate Bridge, one. Two, that they only come out at night. And three, that they're responsible for the death of fifteen or more kids and three of my police officers? [breaks down laughing]” What’s so hard to believe about that? It is 80s horror, you know. Join your faithful Grue-Crew - Crystal Cleveland, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr -  as they journey to the Golden Gate Bridge to battle monsters who are inexplicably known as Neon Maniacs (1986).

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 195 – Neon Maniacs (1986)

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A group of teenagers in San Francisco discovers a nest of homicidal monsters living in a tower of the Golden Gate Bridge, but when they try to tell authorities, no one believes them.

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Neon Maniacs is Chad’s pick and he thinks it’s pretty cool. He loves the randomness of the story and let making sense be damned. Where do they come from? Why do monsters who can be destroyed by water live underneath a bridge? No one knows. Crystal loves Neon Maniacs, especially the music and the battle-of-the-bands sequence. Calling the story nearly nonexistent, she still thinks it’s awesome. Bill likens monsters vulnerable to water living under a bridge to vampires hiding in a garlic factory over a silver mine where they make crucifixes. According to Bill, Neon Maniacs is typical 80s horror with an ending that seems to be building up to something and then… fade to black and go home. Though the story is filled with huge holes and the police are more clueless than usual, Jeff had fun with Neon Maniacs, watching it with a big smile on his face.

Though Neon Maniacs is not a good movie by any measure, it is a fun watch. If you choose to do so, it is currently available to stream on Tubi and on YouTube, and on Blu-ray as Spanish or German imports.

Every two weeks, Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1980s podcast will cover another horror film from the 1980s. The next episode’s film, chosen by Jeff, will be Scarecrows (1988), mostly because its one-theater theatrical release was in Des Moines, Iowa. 

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the gruesome Magazine Youtube channel, on the website or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

Nov 29, 2021

“Oh, good! So you've taken to our local specialty. Pickled earthworms in aspic is not to everyone's taste, I can tell you.” By the way, aspic is a savory jelly made with meat stock, set in a mold, and used to contain pieces of meat, seafood, eggs, or, apparently, earthworms. Sound better now? Join your faithful Grue-Crew - Crystal Cleveland, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr -  as they take a trip into the bizarre world of Ken Russell’s The Lair of the White Worm (1988).

Decades of Horror 1980s
Episode 194 – The Lair of the White Worm (1988)

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When an archaeologist uncovers a strange skull in a foreign land, the residents of a nearby town begin to disappear, leading to further inexplicable occurrences.

IMDb

 

The Lair of the White Worm is Crystal’s pick, but alas, she was unavailable and we had to go ahead without her. Chad’s first impression is along the lines of, “It’s a Ken Russell movie alright.” It starts with finding a skull in the field and just keeps getting weirder and weirder and more phallic and weirder and more phallic and... Bill is a big fan of Russell’s Altered States (1980) and loves this weird, 1980s slice of Ken Russell with its neat, little take on the legend of the Lampton Worm (D’Ampton Worm, get it?). In his view, the best thing about The Lair of the White Worm is Amanda Donahoe. Sammi Davis’s performance was an unexpected treat for Jeff and he loved the commonsense approach to fighting the “snake people.” Rather than a high priest reading an incantation from a volume of forgotten lore, the film’s heroes resort to snake-charming with a bagpipe, followed by releasing a mongoose and throwing a hand grenade, both having been hidden in Angus’s (Peter Capaldi) sporran.

If you’re in the mood for some Ken Russell bizarre hallucinations/dream sequences, gratuitous nudity, and what-the-f***ery, The Lair of the White Worm should be just the ticket. At the time of this writing, The Lair of the White Worm is available to stream on Amazon Prime and a variety of other free-with-ads or PPV services, as well as on physical media as a Blu-ray from Vestron Video and Lionsgate.

Every two weeks, Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1980s podcast will cover another horror film from the 1980s. The next episode’s film, chosen by Chad, will be Neon Maniacs (1986). Here on Decades of Horror 1980s, we do love films with “maniac” in the title. 

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the gruesome Magazine Youtube channel, on the website or email the Decades of Horror 1980s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

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