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Decades of Horror / 1980's / 1970's / Horror News Radio / Monster Movie Podcast / Hannibal Fan Podcat / The Classic Era / American Horror Story Fan Podcast
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Now displaying: Category: Decades of Horror 1970s
Jul 20, 2021

“For a few coins I will hypnotize you and I will read your future in your sleepy eyes.” Sleepy eyes? Might there be a translation problem? Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they fight off the alien invasion with Count Waldemar Daninsky and the boys in Assignment Terror (1970).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 143 – Assignment Terror (1970)

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An alien scientist and his team are sent to earth from their dying planet to exterminate the human population by unleashing monsters like vampires, werewolves, and mummies in order to inherit the earth.

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Doc selected this return to the world of Paul Naschy’s Count Waldemar Daninsky. Bill describes Assignment Terror as a movie with a strong opening, a strong ending, and a long lag in the middle, although he does appreciate the film’s version of a mummy. Chad has a tough time making any sense out of the film and agrees with Bill that the mummy is great, adding that its versions of Frankenstein’s monster and Dracula are horrible. Assignment Terror can’t decide if it wants to be an alien invasion movie or a monster movie according to Jeff, who found it to be a quirky, crappy movie with interesting tidbits. Doc went for the movie with the poster that had the monsters on it and did not like the experience. Although he liked the monsters, he found the middle of Assignment Terror to be slow, boring, and dull.

Assignment Terror is available to stream from multiple sources but the 70s Grue-Crew is unanimous in their recommendation to make the effort to seek out the best quality source. The film is also available on physical media as a Scorpion Releasing Blu-ray from Ronin Flix.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be When a Stranger Calls (1979), chosen by Jeff. Be sure to join us for that one. 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Jul 11, 2021

“This will go far beyond every STRETCH of the imagination.” What if you don’t want your imagination STRETCHED in that direction? Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr, along with guest host Daphne Monary-Ernsdorff from the Classic Era - as they, maybe foolishly, push through the ordeal of watching and discussing Sardu, Ralphus, et al in Joel M. Reed’s Bloodsucking Freaks (1976).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 142 – Bloodsucking Freaks (1976)

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Sardu, master of the Theatre of the Macabre, and his assistant Ralphus run a show in which, under the guise of 'magic', they torture and murder people in front of their audience. But what the spectators see as a trick is actually real.

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Bloodsucking Freaks. What can they say? Well, Chad says it’s full of wanton destruction, gore, and misogyny, and is the epitome of 70s exploitation. On a similar note, Bill describes watching Bloodsucking Freaks as an ordeal consisting of a series of atrocious scenarios with bad special effects, emphasizing that he would not recommend the film to anyone he likes. Jeff agrees Bloodsucking Freaks has no redeeming value whatsoever, recommending that if you must watch it, choose the Last Drive-In with Joe Bob Briggs treatment. At least that way, you’re able to digest it in 15-minute doses interspersed with interesting and humorous stories about the filmmakers. Finally, repugnant, repulsive, and degenerate are the words Doc uses to describe Bloodsucking Freaks, adding that he was thinking at least we didn’t see anyone’s genitalia cut off, … oops, spoke too soon.

As of this writing, Bloodsucking Freaks is available to stream on Shudder and on physical media as a Blu-ray from Troma.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Assignment Terror (1970), a Paul Naschy film chosen by Doc! Be sure to join us for that one. 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the Gruesome Magazine YouTube channel, on the website or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

Jun 21, 2021

“Oh man, you're weird.” That ain’t the half of it! Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr, along with guest host Daphne Monary-Ernsdorff from the Classic Era - as they check out Gregory Peck, Laurence Olivier, James Mason, and Lilli Palmer in The Boys from Brazil (1978).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 141 – The Boys from Brazil (1978)

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A Nazi hunter in Paraguay discovers a sinister and bizarre plot to rekindle the Third Reich.

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The Boys from Brazil is Bill’s pick, but alas, busy summer schedules created conflicts that could not be resolved. Luckily, Daphne was able to join the 1970s Grue-Crew on short notice. However, she was disappointed in The Boys from Brazil, especially with its amazing cast and being based on an Ira Levin novel. Chad didn’t enjoy the film either, calling it boring. He just couldn’t believe the batshit-crazy ending and refers to The Boys from Brazil as an oddity. On the other hand, Jeff loves the film. Being an Ira Levin fan, and having recently seen Gregory Peck in The Omen (1976) and Laurence Olivier as a Nazi doctor in Marathon Man (1976), Jeff thinks he was predisposed to like The Boys from Brazil. Doc splits the difference by admitting he enjoyed the movie even though he didn’t like it. To be clear, Doc enjoyed The Boys from Brazil for the acting and the cast of great character actors, not for the story and the weird ending. He will probably watch it over and over again just for the cast and even though it “zoinks,” he somehow had fun with it.

The Boys from Brazil is currently available on a variety of streaming services and on a Blu-ray disk from Timeless Media.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Bloodsucking Freaks (1976), chosen by Chad! Be sure to join us for that one. 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment at the Gruesome Magazine YouTube channel, on the website, or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com. 

Jun 7, 2021

“Dead? Not dead. Look at me. Look at me! I am the one who is dead. All safe and dead. All safe and dead.” You certainly wouldn’t have to worry about being killed if that’s what you mean by being safe. Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr, along with guest host Daphne Monary-Ernsdorff from the Classic Era - as they check out The Haunting of Julia (1977), starring Mia Farrow, Tom Conti, and Keir Dullea.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 140 – The Haunting of Julia (1977)

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After her daughter's death, wealthy American homemaker Julia Lofting moves to London to restart her life. All seems well until she is haunted by the ghosts of other children while mourning for her own.

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The Haunting of Julia, aka Full Circle, is Jeff’s pick and he loves the gothic atmosphere and the surreal feel to the film. Bill identifies The Haunting of Julia as a slow burn, superficially reminiscent of Don’t Look Now (1973), with evidence of a cult following on the internet. Daphne got sucked into the “is-it-or-isn’t-it-supernatural” nature of the story, appreciates the dark place it goes, and loves Mia Farrow’s performance. Mrs. Fludd, the quirky seance conductor, is one of Chad’s favorite characters, and though he agrees The Haunting of Julia is a bit slow, he also thinks the last 15-20 minutes are well worth the wait. 

Though your Classic Era Grue-Crew is divided regarding some aspects of the film, they agree that Mia Farrow’s performance and the last act are the best parts of The Haunting of Julia, currently streaming VOD.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be The Boys from Brazil (1978), chosen by Bill! Be sure to join us for that one. 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

May 24, 2021

“In the future, you'll have my life of vice on your conscience and when I lay some delicious pig, I'll think that I'm laying the blame on your shoulders, buster, and that'll be my revenge, that's what.” So there! Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they bravely, or maybe foolishly, venture outside his “Blind Dead” series to discuss Amando de Ossorio’s Demon Witch Child (1975).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 139 – Demon Witch Child (1975)

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A young girl becomes possessed by a woman from a witch’s cult, who seeks vengeance, terror, and confusion around her family and the town folks.

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Your Decades of Horror 1970s Grue-Crew thought it was time to check out something from Amando de Ossorio other than a film in his infamous “Blind Dead” series, and that’s how they ended up covering Demon Witch Child (aka, The Possessed; aka, La endemoniada) on this episode. Despite loving Tombs of the Blind Dead, Doc quickly recognizes Demon Witch Child as a very poor attempt to cash in on the success of The Exorcist (1973). Despite it being a mess of a movie, he admits he has fun watching it. Chad is a little harsher, in fact, guaran-damn-teeing he will never watch Demon Witch Child again. The only positive thing about a low-budget movie like this, according to Bill, is that you get real-looking people in the roles, leading him to wonder what nightmare would result if the little boy from Burial Ground (1981) and the girl from this film had a child. Jeff thought the so-bad-it-was funny dubbing was hilarious, almost like a “Bad Lip Reading” video.

As you may have guessed, your 70s Grue-Crew can’t recommend Demon Witch Child, unless, of course, you are an Amando de Ossorio completist or your thang is bad dubbing. Seek it out at your own peril. 

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be The Haunting of Julia (1977), chosen by Jeff. Be sure to join them for that one. 

They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

May 10, 2021

“Let me make it very clear to you, Mrs. Jacquard. I am boss cocky in this hospital.” Hmm. Is boss cocky an Australian thing? At any rate, join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they attempt to determine how the title character’s powers work in Patrick (1978).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 138 – Patrick (1978)

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A comatose hospital patient harasses and kills using his powers of telekinesis to claim his private nurse as his own.

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Chad enjoys Patrick even though he is generally not a big fan of telekinesis movies. It got to him when the supposedly comatose Patrick finally turns his head and looks at a nurse. He is also impressed with Susan Penhaligon’s performance as Kathie Jacquard. Bill enjoyed the movie’s weird quirkiness and finds the idea of a monster that doesn’t move throughout the film to be an interesting concept. He also notes that the matron and doctor are the kind of characters you love to hate. The amount of attention given to character development impressed Jeff and he too is a fan of Susan Haligon’s performance. When Doc first saw Patrick as a teenager, he thought it was boring. This time around, however, he finds it to be a mature horror film that delves into its characters. 

Patrick is one of the first Ozploitation films to achieve a wide international release and success. Your Decades of Horror 1970s Grue-Crew thinks you ought to give it a watch or a rewatch, whatever the case may be. As of this writing, Patrick is available to stream on Shudder and Amazon Prime and as physical media on a Blu-ray from Severin.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Amando de Ossorio’s Demon Witch Child (1975), chosen by Doc. Be sure to join us for that one. It should be, shall we say, interesting.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

Apr 26, 2021

"Death is the keeper of secrets.” In other words, three can keep a secret if two are dead? Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they check out exactly how many secrets are kept in Torso (1973), Sergio Martino’s giallo all’italiana.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 137 – Torso (1973)

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A string of appalling lust murders shocks the University of Perugia as a sadistic serial killer strangles to death beautiful college girls with a red and black scarf.

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Jeff sees several giallo tropes present in Torso and thinks the first hour seemed a bit pedestrian. During the last half-hour, however, the tension really ramped up. Though not a big giallo fan in general, Chad also thinks the first hour is a tough slog, but the third act more than makes up for it. The trailer for Torso is one of Bill’s favorites and he agrees the film’s tone flips about an hour into it. He also gives it credit for being pretty stylistic, especially for the time in which it is released. Doc, however, found himself rather surprised that he likes Torso as much as he does, citing its brutality, the switch in the main character, and the abundance of suspects as reasons why.

The Decades of Horror 1970s Grue-Crew appreciate Torso, some more than others, but they all agree it is worth a watch, especially if you're a fan of giallo films. As of this writing, Torso is available to stream from Shudder and on physical media as a Special Edition Blu-ray from Arrow Video.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Patrick (1978), chosen by Chad! Be sure to join us for that one. 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com. 

Apr 12, 2021

"Welcome to Starlight Hotel. Your room is reserved...Check-in...But never check out!” Well, they better have free breakfast and wi-fi. Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - and as they check out the dwindling number of lodgers at the cut-rate hotel in Tobe Hooper’s Eaten Alive (1976).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 136 – Eaten Alive (1976)

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A psychotic redneck, who owns a dilapidated hotel in rural East Texas, kills various people who upset him or his business, and he feeds their bodies to a large crocodile that he keeps as a pet in the swamp beside his hotel.

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Eaten Alive is not one of Tobe Hooper’s better films. Even so, the cast is filled with horror-cred: Marilyn Burns, William Finley, Robert Englund, Carolyn Jones, and Kyle Richards. Jeff loved the cast and is a big fan of Neville Brand’s work, but the crocodile was, at best, suspect. Chad really hated the film. Eaten Alive should be a good film but he wonders if big ideas and available resources were confined by the budget leaving the film with characters being weird for the sake of being weird. Bill reminds us that Tobe Hooper left before production ended and goes on to describe the story as having no narrative, William Finley as being off the wall, and the crocodile as terrible. Having said that, however, he also describes Eaten Alive as interesting in that some of the scenes are beautifully shot. Doc agrees with Chad that there seems to be a vision buried in this movie that doesn’t materialize, making it hard to watch as ideas fail to gel and in the end, it doesn’t work.

Check this puppy out if you are a Tobe Hooper completist or if you want to see Neville Brand chew some scenery and see William Finley chew even more scenery. Eaten Alive is currently available to stream VOD and as physical media on Blu-ray discs from Arrow Video (2-disc Special Edition).

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Torso (1973), chosen by Bill! Be sure to join us for that one. 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Mar 29, 2021

"No! The Beast has no brother! Don't call me your brother!” What a mean thing to say to your brother! … er, cousin. … er, the antichrist? On second thought, maybe it’s not that mean. Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they catch up with The Omen's Damien and find out what the incorrigible teen has been up to in Damien: Omen II (1978).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 135 – Damien: Omen II (1978)

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Damien, the Antichrist, now about to turn thirteen years old, finally learns of his destiny under the guidance of an unholy disciple of Satan. Meanwhile, dark forces begin to eliminate all those who suspect the child's true identity.

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Damien: Omen II followed its predecessor, The Omen, by only two years but did not perform near as well at the box office. For Chad, the tone was completely different from The Omen, not having near the dangerous vibe, but it was still a fun watch with great kills. Bill found it to be better than he remembered and though it certainly doesn’t have the memorable imagery from the first one, it does have a great cast and some interesting political manipulations. Jeff also thinks Damien: Omen II is missing something found in The Omen and thought the music, though still by Jerry Goldsmith, fell short of setting the necessary mood.  Damien: Omen II is Doc’s pick and he loves this movie! For him, the joy is in the preposterous kills and the excellent cast but he laments that you do not feel the presence of the Antichrist.

As of this writing, Damien: Omen II is available to stream on Hulu and on Blu-ray as part of various packagings of The Omen Collection.

The 1970s Grue-Crew (The Black Saint, Doc, and Jeff) covered The Omen (1976) in May 2017 on episode 50. You can check it out here: The Omen (1976) — Episode 50 — Decades Of Horror 1970s

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Tobe Hooper’s Eaten Alive (1976), chosen by Jeff! Be sure to join us for that one. 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Mar 15, 2021

"When the red moon sets and the sun rises in the West, two monsters will appear to save the people.” But first, you have to listen to the song. Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - and as they try to keep the aliens, monsters, and good guys straight, while learning a few wrestling moves on the side, in the kaiju romp from Toho known as Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla (1974).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 134 – Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla (1974)

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Ape-like aliens build a robotic Godzilla to destroy Japan, and the true Godzilla may not be powerful enough to destroy it.

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It’s Chad’s pick this episode and he first learned of Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla from a trailer he saw while watching Sanford and Son and he immediately knew he had to see it, even if he had to walk uphill both ways the three miles to the theater. He is a big fan of The Six Million Dollar Man and thought Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla was the best thing he’d ever seen. Even now, he had a blast watching the movie despite its cheese factor. Bill, a huge kaiju fan, has always liked Mechagodzilla and its Swiss Army knife arsenal of weaponry. As always, Jeff is playing catch up with the rest of the 70s Grue-Crew when it comes to kaiju, but he loved the explosions! They “blowed” up stuff real good! Doc is also a lover of kaiju and monster films and was gaga over the four monsters in this one - the title characters, Anguirus, and King Shisa - and the wrestling moves the monsters utilize. 

Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla gets a big thumbs up from the 70s Grue-Crew! (Don’t they all?) The film is currently available for streaming on HBOmax and The Criterion Channel, and on Blu-ray disc in the Godzilla: The Showa-Era Films, 1954–1975 Box Set from Criterion.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Damien: Omen II (1978), chosen by Doc! Be sure to join us for that one. 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com. 

Mar 1, 2021

"Marco!” How many of you responded with, “Polo?” Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they have a nice visit with Mario Bava and Daria Nicolodi in Shock (1977), where nobody says, “Polo.”

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 133 – Shock (1977)

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A couple is terrorized in their new house haunted by the vengeful ghost of the woman's former husband, who possesses their young son.

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This one is Bill’s pick and even though he is a super Bava-fan, it slipped by him for a while due to the title change from Shock to Beyond the Door II. When he eventually viewed it, he realized it was missing Bava’s bold use of colors but still contained impressive small touches that identified the film as his, even with a minuscule budget and a small cast. Chad enjoyed Shock, especially the Bava moments, but laments it being his last film, wishing the director had gone out on a higher note. For Jeff, this is definitely Daria Nicolodi’s film and the last 15-20 minutes of bizarreness made it all worthwhile. Doc, while pointing out its unevenness, goes on to say Shock is definitely for Bava fans and fans of drive-in movies with the film playing like the third movie on a drive-in bill. 

You Bava completists and 70s drive-in movie fans out there need to check out Shock. At the time of this writing, the film is available for streaming from Shudder and Amazon Prime.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla (1974), chosen by Chad! Be sure to join us for some Kaiju fun. 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Feb 15, 2021

"You come to me with a hospital I can't find and a doctor that nobody knows and a kidnapped girl who doesn't exist. Go get Aladdin's lamp and make your three wishes come true. Then we can talk.” Uhh, does that make sense to you? Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they add another William Girdler notch to their belts as they take on his first movie, Asylum of Satan (1972).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 132 – Asylum of Satan (1972)

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A young woman finds herself held against her will in an eerie mental asylum by the sinister "Dr. Specter" and his masculine-looking assistant, Martine. She begins to suspect that the visions of horror she experiences are not nightmares and that she is due to be sacrificed to The Evil One.

IMDb

 

William Girdler’s Asylum of Satan is truly a sight to behold. When Chad finally got to the end and saw the devil, he thought it was just one of the cult leaders wearing a rubber mask. Even so, some of the effects were unsettling enough to give him the creeps despite the film’s low budget. Asylum of Satan is a really, really, rough movie that is poorly written and poorly acted according to Jeff, but you can still see the promise of an eye for creating disturbing shots. Bill confirms that it is not a good movie but he did like Charles Kissinger’s double, nay, triple role which at first, he was unable to spot. Doc is all aboard the it’s-a-bad-movie train but for him, it feels like quintessential, 70s, drive-in movie fare and he found a kind of charm to Asylum of Satan

In the final analysis, the 70s Grue-Crew says, hey, Asylum of Satan is William Girdler’s first film!! You know you want to, even must, watch it, Grue-Believers! The Power of The Black Saint Compels You! 

At the time of this writing, Asylum of Satan is available to stream on Amazon Prime so head on over and check it out. You can also check out these episodes of the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast on other William Girdler films:

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Shock (1972), Mario Bava’s last film and starring Daria Nicolodi. Be sure to join the Decades of Horror 1970s Grue-Crew for that one! 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Feb 1, 2021

"Gargoyles are a scientific fact. And they're no more dangerous than a high school dropout on a motorcycle.” Well, maybe they’re a little more dangerous than a high school dropout on a motorcycle. Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they learn from Uncle Willie that there were real-life models for all of those stone sculptures perched on buildings and known as Gargoyles (1972).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 131 – Gargoyles (1972)

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An anthropologist/paleontologist and his daughter, while traveling through the southwestern U.S., stumble upon a colony of living, breathing gargoyles.

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Gargoyles premiered November 21, 1972, on CBS and is one of a handful of TV-movie, horror gems that were broadcast in the 1970s. Jeff is impressed with how well laid out the story is and loves that all the gargoyles look different. Bill loves the cast and thinks the gargoyle costumes are amazing, especially considering the budget and that it’s Stan Winston’s first film credit. For Chad, the true test is that it still gives him the same feels as when he first watched it as a kid.  Doc recounts how the jumping, leaping creatures made a huge impression and he is really impressed at how good Gargoyles is.

At the time of this writing, Gargoyles is available to stream on Amazon Prime and as physical media on a German import DVD. If you haven’t seen this one for a while, the time might be right for you to rectify that condition. The 1970s Grue-Crew give Gargoyles an enthusiastic thumbs up!

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Asylum of Satan (1972), directed by none other than William Girdler. Be sure to join the Decades of Horror 1970s Grue-Crew for that one! 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Jan 18, 2021

"What unit are you with? Why are you here? Why are you doing this to us?” That’s stuff you’d want to know if the military showed up to take over your town, right? Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they take some time off from today’s world of crazies to visit the world of George A. Romero’s The Crazies (1973).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 130 – The Crazies (1973)

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The military attempts to contain a manmade combat virus that causes death and permanent insanity in those infected, as it overtakes a small Pennsylvania town.

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Though not one of Romero’s best films, The Crazies has plenty to offer. Back in the day, Chad thought it was a strange movie for Romero to make but does like some of the ideas presented and finds it interesting. Bill loves the scene with the knitting lady and thinks of The Crazies as a stopgap between Night of the Living Dead (1968) and Dawn of the Dead. For Jeff, The Crazies is one of those movies that has a lot more to offer on the second and third viewings. This is the first watch for Doc and he thinks that with all the messages and opinions within The Crazies, it must be watched with an eye on when it was made. 

So, yeah, it has its faults, but your Decades of Horror 1970s Grue-Crew say, “Hey! It’s Romero! The Crazies is required viewing!” At the time of this writing, The Crazies is available to stream on The Criterion Channel and Amazon Prime and as physical media on a Blu-ray disc from Arrow Video.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be the classic 1972 CBS TV-movie Gargoyles, starring Cornell Wilde, Jennifer Salt, and Bernie Casey, featuring special effects work by Stan Winston in his first credit. 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Jan 4, 2021

"I'm not afraid... I even left my crucifix upstairs.” Oh-oh. Big mistake. Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they go vampire hunting and find one in Grave of the Vampire (1972).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 129 – Grave of the Vampire (1972)

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Kroft, a legendary vampire, returns from sleep. Kroft attacks a couple in a graveyard, raping the woman. The child born feeds only on blood from his mother's breast.

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Grave of the Vampire is a lesser-known vampire film from the 1970s with aspects that make it worth a watch. Bill identifies Michael Pataki’s character as the most sleazy and detestable vampire ever, even making the vampire in Vampire Circus look like a debonair man about town. Chad hated Grave of the Vampire when he saw it back in the day and he still hates it, wearing out the 10-second fast forward button while he was watching. Agreeing that the movie lacks execution in many areas, Jeff also points out the violence and the number of kills. Doc didn’t care much for it when he saw Grave of the Vampire in the 1970s, but the film is now one of the many 70s horror films he classifies as guilty pleasures.

If you skipped Grave of the Vampire in the past due to the poor visual quality, you might want to think about giving it another shot based on the improved look of current versions. As of this writing, the movie is available on physical media as a Blu-ray from Scream Factory and can be viewed streaming on Amazon Prime and Epix.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be George Romero’s The Crazies (1973), chosen by Chad. 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Dec 21, 2020

"There was no body because there was no murder!" Of course, if you say it often enough, it becomes a bit hypnotizing. Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they try to keep their eyes on the aforementioned body in Brian De Palma’s Sisters (1972).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 128 – Sisters (1972)

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A small-time reporter tries to convince the police she saw a murder in the apartment across from hers.

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Your Decades of Horror 1970s Grue-Crew take on their fourth film directed by Brian De Palma after having first covered The Fury (1978, Ep 35), Phantom of the Paradise (1974, Ep 40), and Carrie (1976, Ep 42). This time, their topic is De Palma's Sisters (1972). Jeff picked this one and reveals that it plays to his fear of being committed to a psychiatric facility and not being able to get out. Chad recognizes some Hitchcock influences and enjoys seeing Margot Kidder give a well-played performance. De Palma’s use of split screens catches Bill’s attention as he points out how in Sisters, the technique makes a lot of sense and adds to the telling of the story. Doc finds Sisters to be a very competent first thriller from De Palma, and even though he is not a fan of hers, he thinks she does a good job here. Of course, you can’t forget Bernard Herrmann’s score either.

If you haven’t seen Sisters, it is definitely worth your time. At this writing, it is available to stream on HBOmax and The Criterion Channel and on physical media as a Blu-ray disc from Criterion.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. The film for their next episode, chosen by Bill, is Grave of the Vampire (1972), starring William Smith and written by David Chase.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Dec 7, 2020

"Spewed from intergalactic space to clutch the planet earth in its ... terror tentacles!” Surely you’re speaking of a giant kisslip cuttlefish! Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they sail to a mystical atoll in the Pacific that is under attack by the Space Amoeba (1970), aka Yog: Monster of Space!

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 127 – Space Amoeba (1970, Yog: Monster from Space)

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A space probe is infiltrated by alien beings and then crashes on a remote Pacific atoll. A group planning to build a resort hotel land on the island and discover it to be inhabited by giant mutant monsters created by the aliens in an attempt to conquer the world.

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For your Decades of Horror 1970s Grue-Crew, the operative word for Space Amoeba is “fun!” Chad, Bill, and Doc are big Kaiju fans, while in comparison, Jeff is relatively inexperienced. Even so, their comments are pretty universal regarding Yog: Monster from Space. Chad says the sillier the better and if you want silly, you got it with Space Amoeba. According to Bill, it’s not great, but how can you not have fun with big rubber monsters slapping each other. Doc wonders aloud if it is good and then answers his own question: technically no, but it sure is a lot of fun. Jeff agrees with the rest of the crew on how fun Space Amoeba is and he manages to learn something as well as Bill schools him on the difference between amphibians and reptiles.

As long as you’re not looking for a Godzilla (1954) type kaiju film and are out for some good clean fun, your 70s Grue-Crew recommends Space Amoeba. At the time of this writing, the film is available for streaming on Amazon Prime.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Brian De Palma’s Sisters (1988), chosen by Jeff. 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Nov 23, 2020

"We have to convince the little housewife out there that the tomato that ate the family pet is not dangerous!” So you’re saying it’s a marketing problem? Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they wade through the tomato pulp & schlock that is Attack of the Killer Tomatoes (1978).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 126 – Attack of the Killer Tomatoes! (1978)

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A group of scientists band together to save the world from mutated killer tomatoes.

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You knew your Decades of Horror 1970s Grue-Crew was going to get to Attack of the Killer Tomatoes sooner or later, and Chad made sure it was sooner. Chad was told it was a horror comedy and discovered it was neither a horror film or a comedy. Despite it being idiotic and dumb, it still holds a special place in his heart. For Jeff, Attack of the Killer Tomatoes is a dish best eaten in small servings. The theme song is the best part for Bill. Otherwise, he uses words like terrible, lame, and cringy to describe the film. Doc hated Attack of the Killer Tomatoes and still does and thinks ultimately, it can only be appreciated in its complete cult classic-ness.

The Grue-Crew is understandably divided on this episode’s film, but for lovers of Attack of the Killer Tomatoes or maybe just the cult-film-curious, as of this writing, it can be streamed on Amazon Prime or as physical media on Blu-ray fro MVD Rewind.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Pumpkinhead (1988), chosen by Crystal. 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Nov 9, 2020

"Sleep on, my sweet Victoria, for regal claws of noble birds guard well your place of rest. For those poor fools that dare intrude, the penalty is death.” Even so, intrude they shall. Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they take the resurrection train to see Dr. Phibes Rises Again (1972).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 125 – Dr. Phibes Rises Again (1972)

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The vengeful doctor rises again, seeking the Scrolls of Life in an attempt to resurrect his deceased wife.

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Dr, Phibes Rises Again is director Robert Fuest’s follow-up to The Abominable Dr. Phibes and some think it is an example of that rare sequel that is better than its predecessor. Bill saw Dr. Phibes Rises Again first and favors it over the first Phibes film, saying it was Saw before Saw came along. Chad dubs himself a big Phibes Fan and points out the personal tension evident between Vincent Price and Robert Quarry in the movie. The original Phibes movie is Jeff’s favorite but he loves the comic interplay between Superintendent Waverly and Inspector Trout in this one. Doc first saw both Phibes films as a double feature and he digs Dr. Phibes Rises Again best and thinks the kills are a little more fun. In the end, he likes them best as a pair.

Of course, the 70s Grue-Crew highly recommends Dr. Phibes Rises Again. At this writing, it is available to stream on Amazon Prime and on Blu-ray disc in The Vincent Price Collection II from Scream Factory.

Be sure to check out Decades of Horror 1970s Episode 39 The Abominable Dr. Phibes.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Attack of the Killer Tomatoes (1978). 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Oct 26, 2020

"If you knew what was in that book, you'd turn to jelly! It's not meant for worms like you!” Doesn’t that make you want to read it even more? Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they give their unforced perspective on the legendary film, Equinox (1970).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 124 – Equinox (1970)

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Four friends are attacked by a demon while on a picnic, due to possession of a tome of mystic information. Told in flashbacks by the sole survivor.

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A group of people with little or no experience decided to make a movie and they called it Equinox. What they did know how to do were special effects and stop motion animation. The people who worked on it became some of the most legendary special effects artists in movies and had shelves of Oscars to prove it. Bill even calls it one of the greatest movies ever made, professing it changed his life. Jeff gets into the differences between the original cut and the longer theatrical version with the additional footage that was shot. The whole idea of a book opening the door into the unknown intrigued Chad and he loves Equinox! Doc was not impressed the first time he saw the film but came to really respect the forced perspective and the stop motion animation elements. 

The more the 70s Grue-Crew talks about Equinox, the more they are rendered dumbstruck by the cutting edge nature of the special and visual effects and they give it their highest recommendation. If you haven’t seen it, please do so now! 

As of this writing, it is currently available to stream on HBOmax, the Criterion Channel, and Kanopy. Equinox is also currently available on physical media from Criterion.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Dr. Phibes Rises Again (1972). 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Oct 12, 2020

"The hand crawls... the hand threatens... the hand LIVES!!” The next thing you’ll tell us is the hand has blood on its hands. Wait. Does that sound right? Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they wander through the crawling-hand world of And Now the Screaming Starts! (1973).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 123 – And Now the Screaming Starts! (1973)

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England, 1795: the young Catherine has just married Charles Fengriffen and moves into his castle. She becomes the victim of an old curse that lays on the family. On her wedding night, she is raped by a ghost and gets pregnant.

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Despite the immortal cricket living in Jeff’s basement, chirping along throughout the episode, the 1970s Grue-Crew have fun with the Amicus Production of And Now the Screaming Starts! Bill loves the cast, especially Ian Ogilvy and Stephanie Beacham, and bemoans the late entry of Peter Cushing and the even later entry of Herbert Lom. Despite the disembodied crawling hand showing up in the first ten minutes, Chad made it all the way through the film and like Bill, thinks it’s an “okay” film. Jeff kind of likes this film; despite its inconsistencies, he does get some frights. Of course, Doc always appreciates a Peter Cushing film and swears he forgot it was a “hand” film.

Your Decades of Horror 1970s Grue-Crew thinks this is worth the watch for the cast if for nothing else. At this writing, And Now the Screaming Starts! Is available to stream on Amazon and on Blu-ray disc from Severin. (Jeff is ordering the Blu-ray.)

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be the infamous Equinox (1970). 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Sep 28, 2020

"I'm telling you, and I'm telling everybody at this table that that's a shark! And I know what a shark looks like because I've seen one up close. And you'd better do something about this one because I don't intend to go through that hell again!” It must not be safe to go back in the water. Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they foolishly go back in the water anyway for Jaws 2 (1978).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 122 – Jaws 2 (1978)

Police chief Brody must protect the citizens of Amity after a second monstrous shark begins terrorizing the waters.

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The Decades of Horror 1970s Grue-Crew has a mixed reaction to Jaws 2. Chad really missed the Matt Hooper character but loved Roy Schieder’s performance and enjoys the film tremendously. On the other hand, Bill thinks Jaws 2 creates the template for disappointing sequels but having said that, points out that it is the best Jaws sequel and is still entertaining. Jeff enjoyed the film but had problems with the logic of some of its stories. The urgency of the original was missing in Jaws 2, according to Doc, and he was horribly disappointed with it.

The Grue-Crew is a bit split on Jaws 2 but, hey, it’s still the best Jaws sequel. At this writing, it is available on Blu-ray in a variety of packaging and is streaming on HBO max.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be And Now the Screaming Starts! (1974), directed by Roy Ward Baker and starring Peter Cushing, Stephanie Beachem, Ian Ogilvy, Patrick Magee, and Herbert Lom.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Sep 14, 2020

"She eats unmarried young girls. It is the only time she can wear her wedding gown.” Cool! Sounds like a great place to spend your summer vacation. Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they ride the bus to Auntie’s and try to avoid the cat with the laser eyes in House (1977).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 121 – House (Hausu, 1977)

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A schoolgirl and six of her classmates travel to her aunt's country home, which turns out to be haunted.

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Nobuhiko Ôbayashi’s House is an infamous Toho film. According to Bill, if you do an internet search for “weird Japanese movies,” House turns up number one on every list. Chad calls it the strangest movie they’ve ever removed. The 45-minute documentary on the Criterion Blu-ray edition is well worth the cost in Jeff’s opinion, especially in giving the viewer a vague idea of what House is all about. Doc, on the other hand, says don’t even bother trying to follow the narrative, but if you pay attention to what’s going on in the background, you might just see a talking watermelon puppet.

House (Hausu, original title) is without a doubt a unique and stunning film, one everyone should see at least once. Jeff has already recommended the Blu-ray from Criterion and currently, House is available to stream on HBOmax and the Criterion Channel. Your loyal Grue-Crew says check it out!

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror 2-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be And Now the Screaming Starts! (1973), another Amicus Productions film starring Peter Cushing, Stephanie Beacham, Ian Ogilvy, Herbert Lom, and Patrick Magee.

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

Aug 31, 2020

"One of our guests is a werewolf, I know it.” Maybe they need a “werewolf break” to figure it out? Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they play “werewolf, werewolf, who can the werewolf be?” in The Beast Must Die (1974).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 120 – The Beast Must Die (1974)

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Eight people have been invited to an island estate for the weekend. One of them is a werewolf. Can you guess which one?

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The Beast Must Die, the last horror film produced by Amicus Productions, is famous for it’s “werewolf break,” a gimmick in which the film is paused just prior to the werewolf reveal, giving the audience time to guess which character is the werewolf. 

Chad has fun trying to find clues that aren’t there and is thankful for the 10-second advance button on Amazon Prime to help get him through the car chase. Jeff again notices the prevalence of a 1970s, detective-series, funk score and admits The Beast Must Die is kind of a fun movie. The TV-movie feel of The Beast Must Die is a little much for Bill, signaling the beginning of the end for Amicus. Doc points out the pedigree of the actors appearing in the film (and of course, Peter Cushing} and bemoans the complete lack of clues to the identity of the werewolf. 

Though the 70s Grue-Crew admits this isn’t one of the best Amicus films, they still have fun with it. As of this posting, The Beast Must Die is available on Blu-ray from Severin and can be streamed on Amazon Prime.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror 2-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be House (1977), aka Hausu (original title).

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: 190s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

Aug 17, 2020

"Don't you know this house is cursed? You are cursed, and Edward's cursed, and everybody's cursed.” Sounds like Oprah’s curse-giveaway show. Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they try to find the banshee (or is it a sidhe?) in Cry of the Banshee (1970).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 119 – Cry of the Banshee (1970)

Join the Crew on the Gruesome Magazine YouTube channel!
Subscribe today! And click the alert to get notified of new content!
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A team of researchers discovers a strange mutation of man and octopus who proceeds to terrorize them.

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None of the 70s Grue-Crew had seen Cry of the Banshee until now, but American International Pictures and Vincent Price! What could go wrong? Well, Bill can’t find anyone to root for and he is not a fan of director Gordon Hessler with the exception of The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973). Jeff points out there is no banshee in Cry of the Banshee. Doc is disappointed in the overall meanness of the movie and Chad can’t find any redemption or satisfaction with the ending. On the other hand, they can all agree on Vincent Price’s all-in performance and Terry Gilliam’s introduction credits animation sequence. 

If for any reason, after hearing or watching the Grue-Crew’s discussion, you still find it necessary to watch Cry of the Banshee, either again or for the first time, at this writing it’s available to stream on Amazon Prime and on Blu-ray in Scream Factory’s Vincent Price Collection III.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror 2-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be The Beast Must Die (1974), the film with a Werewolf Break when viewers are asked to answer the question, “Who is the Werewolf?”

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

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