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Now displaying: Category: Decades of Horror 1970s
Nov 23, 2020

"We have to convince the little housewife out there that the tomato that ate the family pet is not dangerous!” So you’re saying it’s a marketing problem? Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they wade through the tomato pulp & schlock that is Attack of the Killer Tomatoes (1978).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 126 – Attack of the Killer Tomatoes! (1978)

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A group of scientists band together to save the world from mutated killer tomatoes.

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You knew your Decades of Horror 1970s Grue-Crew was going to get to Attack of the Killer Tomatoes sooner or later, and Chad made sure it was sooner. Chad was told it was a horror comedy and discovered it was neither a horror film or a comedy. Despite it being idiotic and dumb, it still holds a special place in his heart. For Jeff, Attack of the Killer Tomatoes is a dish best eaten in small servings. The theme song is the best part for Bill. Otherwise, he uses words like terrible, lame, and cringy to describe the film. Doc hated Attack of the Killer Tomatoes and still does and thinks ultimately, it can only be appreciated in its complete cult classic-ness.

The Grue-Crew is understandably divided on this episode’s film, but for lovers of Attack of the Killer Tomatoes or maybe just the cult-film-curious, as of this writing, it can be streamed on Amazon Prime or as physical media on Blu-ray fro MVD Rewind.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Pumpkinhead (1988), chosen by Crystal. 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Nov 9, 2020

"Sleep on, my sweet Victoria, for regal claws of noble birds guard well your place of rest. For those poor fools that dare intrude, the penalty is death.” Even so, intrude they shall. Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they take the resurrection train to see Dr. Phibes Rises Again (1972).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 125 – Dr. Phibes Rises Again (1972)

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The vengeful doctor rises again, seeking the Scrolls of Life in an attempt to resurrect his deceased wife.

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Dr, Phibes Rises Again is director Robert Fuest’s follow-up to The Abominable Dr. Phibes and some think it is an example of that rare sequel that is better than its predecessor. Bill saw Dr. Phibes Rises Again first and favors it over the first Phibes film, saying it was Saw before Saw came along. Chad dubs himself a big Phibes Fan and points out the personal tension evident between Vincent Price and Robert Quarry in the movie. The original Phibes movie is Jeff’s favorite but he loves the comic interplay between Superintendent Waverly and Inspector Trout in this one. Doc first saw both Phibes films as a double feature and he digs Dr. Phibes Rises Again best and thinks the kills are a little more fun. In the end, he likes them best as a pair.

Of course, the 70s Grue-Crew highly recommends Dr. Phibes Rises Again. At this writing, it is available to stream on Amazon Prime and on Blu-ray disc in The Vincent Price Collection II from Scream Factory.

Be sure to check out Decades of Horror 1970s Episode 39 The Abominable Dr. Phibes.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Attack of the Killer Tomatoes (1978). 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Oct 26, 2020

"If you knew what was in that book, you'd turn to jelly! It's not meant for worms like you!” Doesn’t that make you want to read it even more? Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they give their unforced perspective on the legendary film, Equinox (1970).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 124 – Equinox (1970)

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Four friends are attacked by a demon while on a picnic, due to possession of a tome of mystic information. Told in flashbacks by the sole survivor.

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A group of people with little or no experience decided to make a movie and they called it Equinox. What they did know how to do were special effects and stop motion animation. The people who worked on it became some of the most legendary special effects artists in movies and had shelves of Oscars to prove it. Bill even calls it one of the greatest movies ever made, professing it changed his life. Jeff gets into the differences between the original cut and the longer theatrical version with the additional footage that was shot. The whole idea of a book opening the door into the unknown intrigued Chad and he loves Equinox! Doc was not impressed the first time he saw the film but came to really respect the forced perspective and the stop motion animation elements. 

The more the 70s Grue-Crew talks about Equinox, the more they are rendered dumbstruck by the cutting edge nature of the special and visual effects and they give it their highest recommendation. If you haven’t seen it, please do so now! 

As of this writing, it is currently available to stream on HBOmax, the Criterion Channel, and Kanopy. Equinox is also currently available on physical media from Criterion.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Dr. Phibes Rises Again (1972). 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Oct 12, 2020

"The hand crawls... the hand threatens... the hand LIVES!!” The next thing you’ll tell us is the hand has blood on its hands. Wait. Does that sound right? Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they wander through the crawling-hand world of And Now the Screaming Starts! (1973).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 123 – And Now the Screaming Starts! (1973)

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England, 1795: the young Catherine has just married Charles Fengriffen and moves into his castle. She becomes the victim of an old curse that lays on the family. On her wedding night, she is raped by a ghost and gets pregnant.

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Despite the immortal cricket living in Jeff’s basement, chirping along throughout the episode, the 1970s Grue-Crew have fun with the Amicus Production of And Now the Screaming Starts! Bill loves the cast, especially Ian Ogilvy and Stephanie Beacham, and bemoans the late entry of Peter Cushing and the even later entry of Herbert Lom. Despite the disembodied crawling hand showing up in the first ten minutes, Chad made it all the way through the film and like Bill, thinks it’s an “okay” film. Jeff kind of likes this film; despite its inconsistencies, he does get some frights. Of course, Doc always appreciates a Peter Cushing film and swears he forgot it was a “hand” film.

Your Decades of Horror 1970s Grue-Crew thinks this is worth the watch for the cast if for nothing else. At this writing, And Now the Screaming Starts! Is available to stream on Amazon and on Blu-ray disc from Severin. (Jeff is ordering the Blu-ray.)

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be the infamous Equinox (1970). 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Sep 28, 2020

"I'm telling you, and I'm telling everybody at this table that that's a shark! And I know what a shark looks like because I've seen one up close. And you'd better do something about this one because I don't intend to go through that hell again!” It must not be safe to go back in the water. Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they foolishly go back in the water anyway for Jaws 2 (1978).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 122 – Jaws 2 (1978)

Police chief Brody must protect the citizens of Amity after a second monstrous shark begins terrorizing the waters.

IMDb

 

The Decades of Horror 1970s Grue-Crew has a mixed reaction to Jaws 2. Chad really missed the Matt Hooper character but loved Roy Schieder’s performance and enjoys the film tremendously. On the other hand, Bill thinks Jaws 2 creates the template for disappointing sequels but having said that, points out that it is the best Jaws sequel and is still entertaining. Jeff enjoyed the film but had problems with the logic of some of its stories. The urgency of the original was missing in Jaws 2, according to Doc, and he was horribly disappointed with it.

The Grue-Crew is a bit split on Jaws 2 but, hey, it’s still the best Jaws sequel. At this writing, it is available on Blu-ray in a variety of packaging and is streaming on HBO max.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be And Now the Screaming Starts! (1974), directed by Roy Ward Baker and starring Peter Cushing, Stephanie Beachem, Ian Ogilvy, Patrick Magee, and Herbert Lom.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Sep 14, 2020

"She eats unmarried young girls. It is the only time she can wear her wedding gown.” Cool! Sounds like a great place to spend your summer vacation. Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they ride the bus to Auntie’s and try to avoid the cat with the laser eyes in House (1977).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 121 – House (Hausu, 1977)

Join the Crew on the Gruesome Magazine YouTube channel!
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A schoolgirl and six of her classmates travel to her aunt's country home, which turns out to be haunted.

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Nobuhiko Ôbayashi’s House is an infamous Toho film. According to Bill, if you do an internet search for “weird Japanese movies,” House turns up number one on every list. Chad calls it the strangest movie they’ve ever removed. The 45-minute documentary on the Criterion Blu-ray edition is well worth the cost in Jeff’s opinion, especially in giving the viewer a vague idea of what House is all about. Doc, on the other hand, says don’t even bother trying to follow the narrative, but if you pay attention to what’s going on in the background, you might just see a talking watermelon puppet.

House (Hausu, original title) is without a doubt a unique and stunning film, one everyone should see at least once. Jeff has already recommended the Blu-ray from Criterion and currently, House is available to stream on HBOmax and the Criterion Channel. Your loyal Grue-Crew says check it out!

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror 2-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be And Now the Screaming Starts! (1973), another Amicus Productions film starring Peter Cushing, Stephanie Beacham, Ian Ogilvy, Herbert Lom, and Patrick Magee.

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

Aug 31, 2020

"One of our guests is a werewolf, I know it.” Maybe they need a “werewolf break” to figure it out? Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they play “werewolf, werewolf, who can the werewolf be?” in The Beast Must Die (1974).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 120 – The Beast Must Die (1974)

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Eight people have been invited to an island estate for the weekend. One of them is a werewolf. Can you guess which one?

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The Beast Must Die, the last horror film produced by Amicus Productions, is famous for it’s “werewolf break,” a gimmick in which the film is paused just prior to the werewolf reveal, giving the audience time to guess which character is the werewolf. 

Chad has fun trying to find clues that aren’t there and is thankful for the 10-second advance button on Amazon Prime to help get him through the car chase. Jeff again notices the prevalence of a 1970s, detective-series, funk score and admits The Beast Must Die is kind of a fun movie. The TV-movie feel of The Beast Must Die is a little much for Bill, signaling the beginning of the end for Amicus. Doc points out the pedigree of the actors appearing in the film (and of course, Peter Cushing} and bemoans the complete lack of clues to the identity of the werewolf. 

Though the 70s Grue-Crew admits this isn’t one of the best Amicus films, they still have fun with it. As of this posting, The Beast Must Die is available on Blu-ray from Severin and can be streamed on Amazon Prime.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror 2-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be House (1977), aka Hausu (original title).

Please let them know how they’re doing! They want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: leave them a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror: 190s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com

Aug 17, 2020

"Don't you know this house is cursed? You are cursed, and Edward's cursed, and everybody's cursed.” Sounds like Oprah’s curse-giveaway show. Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they try to find the banshee (or is it a sidhe?) in Cry of the Banshee (1970).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 119 – Cry of the Banshee (1970)

Join the Crew on the Gruesome Magazine YouTube channel!
Subscribe today! And click the alert to get notified of new content!
https://youtube.com/gruesomemagazine

A team of researchers discovers a strange mutation of man and octopus who proceeds to terrorize them.

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None of the 70s Grue-Crew had seen Cry of the Banshee until now, but American International Pictures and Vincent Price! What could go wrong? Well, Bill can’t find anyone to root for and he is not a fan of director Gordon Hessler with the exception of The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973). Jeff points out there is no banshee in Cry of the Banshee. Doc is disappointed in the overall meanness of the movie and Chad can’t find any redemption or satisfaction with the ending. On the other hand, they can all agree on Vincent Price’s all-in performance and Terry Gilliam’s introduction credits animation sequence. 

If for any reason, after hearing or watching the Grue-Crew’s discussion, you still find it necessary to watch Cry of the Banshee, either again or for the first time, at this writing it’s available to stream on Amazon Prime and on Blu-ray in Scream Factory’s Vincent Price Collection III.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror 2-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be The Beast Must Die (1974), the film with a Werewolf Break when viewers are asked to answer the question, “Who is the Werewolf?”

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Aug 3, 2020

"The octopus is the most intelligent species in the ocean.” And yet, an anthropomorphic version of an octopus saw fit to appear in this film. Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they try to figure out exactly what the filmmakers were going for in Octaman (1971).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 118 – Octaman (1971)

Join the Crew on the Gruesome Magazine YouTube channel!
Subscribe today! And click the alert to get notified of new content!
https://youtube.com/gruesomemagazine

Synopsis: A team of researchers discovers a strange mutation of man and octopus who proceeds to terrorize them.

IMDb

 

What does Octaman have going for it, you might ask? It is special effects maestro Rick Baker’s first film credit and it is written, directed, and produced by Harry Essex. 

Jeff points out that Essex also wrote The Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954), It Came from Outer Space (1953), Man Made Monster (1941), and even The Sons of Katie Elder (1965) but he can’t figure out where things went off the rails with Octaman. Doc sees an obvious connection to The Creature from the Black Lagoon and Bill affirms that the suit is the best part of Octaman but with some strong caveats. Doug Beswick’s involvement is emphasized by Chad. And they all wonder, what were they thinking?

Your decades of Horror 1970s Grue-Crew gives a cautious recommendation to Octaman for lovers of schlocky horror films and possibly to Rick Baker or Doug Beswick completists. 

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror 2-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Cry of the Banshee (1970) with the great Vincent Price.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Jul 22, 2020

"I prefer ghosts to vampires, though. They're so much more human; they have a tradition to live up to. Somehow they manage to keep all the horror in without spilling any blood." So much easier to clean up; that is if you’re worried about that kind of thing. Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they try to figure out exactly what is going on in Mario Bava’s Lisa and the Devil (1973).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 117 – Lisa and the Devil (1973)

A tourist spends the night in a derelict Spanish villa seemingly held in the supernatural grip of an eccentric butler, who resembles a depiction of the Devil she had seen on an ancient fresco.

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Of course, Lisa and the Devil was chosen by Bill, the Grue-Crew’s very own, registered, Bava fanatic. Even Bill admits to not knowing exactly what the story is about, but Bava! And Elke Sommer! And Telly Savalas! Your 1980s Grue-Crew universally agrees with Bill regarding Bava, Sommer, and Savalas. Chad is a little more hesitant but plans to watch the film again. The beauty of Bava’s imagery is what captures Jeff’s attention, but he is obviously just as confused by the story as everyone else.

The crewmates even get into The House of Exorcism (1975), a later version of Lisa and the Devil, recut with additional footage in a marketing ploy intended to take advantage of the success of The Exorcist (1973). Bill screams, “No, no, no, no, no!” On the other hand, Doc kind of likes The House of Exorcism, much to Bill’s dismay.

Your Decades of Horror 1970s Grue-Crew recommend Lisa and the Devil. It can be viewed, as of this writing, VOD and as a Kino Lorber Blu-ray double feature which includes Lisa and the Devil and The House of Exorcism.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Jul 7, 2020

"Ay, customers, come in, come in. I'm sure I have the very thing to tempt you. Lots of bargains. All tastes catered to. Oh... and a big novelty surprise goes with every purchase. Do come in... any time. I'm always open." Oh boy! A novelty surprise? Wait. Is this a trick? Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they meet the proprietor of Temptations Ltd., the sinister shop found in From Beyond the Grave (1974).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 116 – From Beyond the Grave (1974)

An anthology of four short horror stories revolving around a British antique shop and its mysterious owner.

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From Beyond the Grave is the last of the Amicus horror anthologies, or portmanteaus if you will, and Decades of Horror has covered six of seven such films. Jeff is predisposed to like  From Beyond the Grave because it is directed by Kevin Conner, the same man that directed Motel Hell, one of his favorite films. Doc is impressed by cinematographer Alan Hume’s work and goes into some of his other credits. The penalties doled out by the proprietor of Temptations Ltd. seem a bit severe for the sins committed in Bill’s view, but he still has fun with From Beyond the Grave. Chad loves Margaret Leighton’s portrayal of Madame Orloff and the other members of the Grue-Crew adamantly agree. 

Possibly the least familiar of the Amicus horror portmanteaus, From Beyond the Grave still receives a high recommendation from the Decades of Horror 1970s Grue-Crew. It might be the last, but in their opinion, it is not the least.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror 3-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In three weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Lisa and the Devil (1973), a Mario Bava film.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Jun 29, 2020

"Who is this irresistible creature who has an insatiable love for the dead?" Wait. Do you have to be dead for the insatiable love part? Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they meet the insatiable creature with the insatiable love for the dead known as Lady Frankenstein (1971).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 115 – Lady Frankenstein (1971)

When Dr. Frankenstein is killed by a monster he created, his daughter and his lab assistant Marshall continue his experiments. The two fall in love and attempt to transplant Marshall's brain into the muscular body of the servant Stephen in order to prolong the aging Marshall's life. Meanwhile, the first monster seeks revenge on the grave robbers who sold the body parts used in its creation to Dr. Frankenstein. Soon it comes after Marshall and the doctor's daughter.

IMDb

 

The first thing the Decades of Horror 1970s Grue-Crew discovered is the plethora of different cuts of Lady Frankenstein that exist in the stream-o-verse. The second thing they discovered is they had no idea who the “Stephen” in the synopsis is. Oh well. Forging ahead, Lady Frankenstein is Doc’s pick; he loves him some Frankenstein flicks. Chad favors Karloff’s monster to the one depicted in this film but thinks Joseph Cotten performs admirably in this low-budget Italian fare. Bill marvels at Cotten’s career and the number of highly regarded films in which he played. The ending seems abrupt to Jeff and, of course, they all get in on a discussion about Lady Frankenstein’s director, Mel Welles.

The Grue-Crew’s general consensus is that Lady Frankenstein is a bad film but can be a bad-film fun-watch. Various cuts are currently available for streaming from several sources. There is also a region B, Blu ray out there that includes a diverse set of extras.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror 3-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In three weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be From Beyond the Grave (1974), the last of the seven Amicus portmanteau horror films.
We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

May 31, 2020

"If you and daddy die in a plane crash, could I have a cat then?" It seems like a fair trade, right? Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they get a dose of feline terror in The Uncanny (1977), an anthology film starring Peter Cushing.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 114 – The Uncanny (1977)

Wilbur Gray has stumbled upon a terrible secret, that cats are supernatural creatures who really call the shots. In a desperate attempt to get others to believe him, Wilbur spews three tales of feline horror.

IMDb

 

The Uncanny, a lesser-known Canadian anthology film, is not an Amicus production, even though it is produced by Amicus co-founder Milton Subotsky. The Decades of Horror Grue-Crews love portmanteaus and this one is no exception. Driven by Peter Cushing’s powerful performance opposite Ray Milland in the connecting story, The Uncanny is a worthy, if flawed, addition. Three fairly strong stories of feline mayhem are topped off with the final tale starring Donald Pleasance, Samantha Eggar, and John Vernon obviously having great fun with their roles.

The 1970s Grue-Crew wander through this episode’s discussion like cats looking for something to push off the table. Doc tries to keep them on track but you know what they say about herding cats. The discussion frequently strays off-topic and inevitably goes to the familiar “cats vs. dogs” argument. In case you’re interested, Doc and Bill are cat-people while Chad and Jeff are dog-men.

At any rate, The Uncanny is currently streaming on Amazon Prime and is recommended by your faithful Grue-Crew. Peter After all, with Cushing, Ray Milland, Donald Pleasance, Samantha Eggar, John Vernon, conspiratorial cats, an incredible shrinking girl, and consumption of human flesh, what’s not to like? 

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror 3-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In three weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Lady Frankenstein (1971), an Italian film starring Joseph Cotten.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

May 2, 2020

"If the devil is to exist in this world, it cannot look like a devil." I don’t know. How will we recognize it? Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they polish off the Bloodthirsty Trilogy with Toho’s Evil of Dracula(1974).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 113 – Evil of Dracula (1974)

A teacher assumes a position at a school that's run by a vampire.

IMDb

 

After covering The Vampire Doll (1970) and Lake of Dracula (1971), it is only natural that the Decades of Horror 1970s Grue-Crew would complete the hat trick with Evil of Dracula, the final film in the Bloodthirsty Trilogy.  The Grue-Crewmates have differing opinions on where Evil of Dracula fits in the hierarchy within the loosely connected trilogy, but they universally appreciate the film.

Bill points out that the setting in the girl’s school bears a certain resemblance to Lust for a Vampire (1971), while Doc was fired up to finally complete the trilogy, loving it all the way. Chad always loves a good vampire dissolve and melt and Jeff goes for the hand deflation that’s used in all three of the films. 

What used to be a holy grail for horror fans, nearly impossible to find, is now readily available. Your loyal 70s Grue-Crew all say check these out! At this writing, The Vampire Doll (1970), Lake of Dracula (1971), and Evil of Dracula (1974) are all available streaming on Amazon Prime and are available on Blu ray in Arrow’s The Bloodthirsty Trilogy. And don’t forget to check out their podcasts on the first two of the trilogy:

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror 3-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In three weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Lady Frankenstein (1971), an Italian film starring Joseph Cotten.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at docrotten@decadesofhorror.com

Apr 17, 2020

"It was a small Louisiana town where people live and love and die and no one ever thought of locking their doors... except in the Monroe house." Hey, everybody! Let’s buy the Monroe house! Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they find out why they have to lock their doors in the Monroe house in Charles B. Pierce’s The Evictors (1979).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 112 – The Evictors (1979)

A young couple, just married, rents a house in a village in Louisiana. But they are not welcome because the inhabitants of the village look upon them with distrust. Meanwhile, in the house they rented, were happening strange things from the past...

IMDb

 

After seeing The Legend of Boggy Creek (1972) and The Town that Dreaded Sundown (1976), Jeff thought it would be fun to check out another film from Charles B. Pierce so he chose The Evictors as the subject of this episode. With a cast that includes Jessica Harper, Vic Morrow, Michael Parks, and Sue Ane Langdon, how could he go wrong? It turns out that fine acting and excellent production design do not offset a lackluster story.

Doc and Jeff love the feel of the 1940s created in this production, especially the abundance of automobiles from the era. Bill once again professes his love for Jessica Harper and Chad goes on about Michael Parks and Vic Morrow. The general consensus is great acting and the feel of the 40s, but the languid pacing makes The Evictors an unexciting horror film. If you haven’t seen this entry from Charles B. Pierce and you’re hankering for some 40s nostalgia and some Vic Morrow, Jessica Harper, Michael Parks, or Sue Ane Langdon, check it out. As of this writing, The Evictors is streaming on Amazon Prime and a Blu ray is available from Scream Factory.

Your 70s Grue-Crew also catches up on listener feedback from several episodes and has a ball doing it! They are even chastised a bit by the lovely and talented Judy Matheson (Twins of Evil, Lust for a Vampire) and they attempt to make amends to her, as well as to Luan Peters (Twins of Evil, Lust for a Vampire) and Kirsten Lindholm (Twins of Evil, Lust for a Vampire, The Vampire Lovers) .

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror 3-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In three weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Evil of Dracula (1974), the third film in Toho’s Bloodthirsty Trilogy.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Mar 12, 2020

"Forgive me, but you are an endless source of amusement to me." I amuse you? I make you laugh? I'm here to fuckin' amuse you? … Wait. Wrong movie. Anyway, join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they determine exactly what is so damn endlessly amusing in The Evil (1978) from New World Pictures.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 111 – The Evil (1978)

A doctor buys a Civil War era dilapidated mansion and hires a few friends to fix it up, but the mansion hides a deadly secret.

IMDb

The Evil is Doc’s pick. He does love his haunted house films and this one has it’s share of violent deaths. The 70s Grue-Crew all love Victor Buono’s gleeful turn as the devil! Chad, of course, points out the Batman TV-series connection and Jeff, equally predictably, links Richard Crenna to The Real McCoys (1959-1963) TV-series. Andrew Prine seemed to be everywhere according to Doc as he reminisces about Prine’s career. Bill warns everyone not to try these fire gags in their own low budget, indie horror flicks. The discussion goes astray more often than usual as the Grue-Crew seems to be easily sidetracked on this episode. Though not a great film, your Decades of Horror 1970s Grue-Crew consider this a “good” film … at least in parts, and Victor Buono as the devil is to die for.

At this writing, The Evil is available to stream on Prime and as a Blu-ray from Scream Factory. 

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror 3-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In three weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be The Evictors (1979), starring Jessica Harper, Michael Parks, and Vic Morrow.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Feb 4, 2020

"Touch it! Go on, touch it!" Get your mind out of the gutter. The speaker isn’t talking about that “it.” Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they uncover the true story of Frankenstein in Frankenstein: The True Story (1973) … or not.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 109 – Frankenstein: The True Story (1973)

When the brilliant but unorthodox scientist Dr. Victor Frankenstein rejects the artificial man that he has created, the Creature escapes and later swears revenge.

IMDb

 

Yet again, the Decades of Horror 1970s Grue-Crew delves into the realm of television mini-series with Frankenstein: The True Story, broadcast in two parts in 1973. Bill points out exactly why the title is one of the biggest misnomers in film history. Chad had a problem with the creature (Michael Sarrazin) being so handsome in the beginning but enjoyed its deterioration as the film progressed. Doc opines that the 2-hour edited version available on Amazon Prime is a hot mess of bad editing and should probably be avoided. Jeff once again goes a bit fan-boy, this time for David McCallum.

Your Grue-Crew universally enjoyed the cast and some of the set pieces and are withholding judgment until the March 24, 2020 Scream Factory release. Maybe a quality copy of the unedited version will restore the film they remembered.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror 3-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In three weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Hammer’s Twins of Evil (1971). 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Jan 10, 2020

"-- Zuni doll gibberish --" You might not know what he’s saying, but you’re definitely not hanging around to find out! Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they relive the impact they experienced when they first watched Trilogy of Terror (1975) from Dan Curtis.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 108 – Trilogy of Terror (1975)

Three bizarre horror stories all of which star Karen Black in four different roles playing tormented women.

IMDB

 

  • Director: Dan Curtis
  • Writers: William F. Nolan, Richard Matheson
  • Music: Bob Cobert
  • Film Editing: Les Green
  • Special Effects:
  • Segments
    • "Julie" - Julie Eldridge is a sexually-repressed college teacher who is blackmailed by one of her students for a past indiscretion in which she played an unwilling part.
      • Teleplay by William F. Nolan, based on a Richard Matheson story, “The Likeness of Julie.” as by Logan Swanson in the anthology Alone by Night (1962) ed. Don Congdon, Michael Congdon, Ballantine Books; then in Shock II (1964), Dell.
      • Karen Black as Julie
      • Robert Burton as Chad Rogers
      • Jim Storm as Eddie Nells
      • Gregory Harrison as the New Student
      • Kathryn Reynolds as Anne Richards
      • Orin Cannon as Motel Clerk
    • "Millicent and Therese" - Millicent Larimore is a plain-looking, almost reclusive woman who lives with her amoral twin sister Therese who delights in tormenting her.
      • Teleplay by William F. Nolan from the Richard Matheson story “Therese” (aka “Needle in the Heart”) (1969), Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine, October 1969, Shock Waves - Oct 1970
      • Karen Black as Millicent / Therese
      • John Karlen as Thomas Amman
      • George Gaynes as Dr. Chester Ramsey
      • Tracy Curtis as Tracy
    • "Amelia"  - Amelia, in a solo horror story monologue, is a mother-dominated woman who buys a Zuni fetish doll for her latest boyfriend.
      • Written by Richard Matheson based on his own story, "Prey" (1969), Playboy, April 1969, Shock Waves - Oct 1970
      • Karen Black as Amelia
      • Frank Welker and Walker Edmiston (uncredited) as the voice of the Zuni doll

Each of the members of the Grue-Crew for this episode viewed Trilogy of Terror during its television premiere in 1975 and it made an indelible mark on each of their psyches. Of course, that mark, the one that created nightmares and lost sleep, is left by the final segment in which the Zuni doll runs amok. The Grue-Crew also has a heightened appreciation for Karen Black’s acting abilities after rewatching the film and her four performances therein. They also all agree that the terror in the final segment is just as strong and effective as it was in 1975. If you haven’t seen Dan Curtis’ Trilogy of Terror recently, you owe yourself a rewatch. It’s that good. At least, the Zuni-warrior doll piece is that good!

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror 3-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In three weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Frankenstein: The True Story (1973). 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at docrotten@decadesofhorror.com


Dec 5, 2019

"The saliva is very contagious. It dribbles into open wounds and cuts, and causes immediate infection. So don’t let anybody bite you." That sounds like universally good advice! Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they try to figure out the nature of the body horror David Cronenberg dreamt up in Rabid (1977)!

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 107 – Rabid (1977)

A young woman develops a taste for human blood after experimental plastic surgery, and her victims turn into blood-thirsty zombies, leading into a city-wide epidemic.

- IMDb

 

As the entire Gruesome Nation already knows, the Soska sisters’ version of Rabid is scheduled for release on December 13, 2019. With that in mind, your Decades of Horror 1970s Grue-Crew decided the time was right for them to cover Cronenberg’s original version of Rabid, released in 1977. 

Jeff is completely unaware that he manages to confuse Ivory Soap (9944/100% pure) with Ivory Snow, “the safest possible soap for diapers and baby clothes” that featured Marilyn Chambers on the box just prior to her career as a pornographic film actress. In his defense, they are both made by Proctor and Gamble and come from the same “Ivory” line of products. Besides that, he loves Cronenberg’s second feature film and finds the “science” behind Rose’s condition fascinating.

The entire Grue-Crew first caught Rabid (1977) on an early-80s video store rental, ... except for Doc. He broke his Rabid cherry with a big-screen viewing, is thrilled with the results, and is impressed by Chambers’ acting in the film. Bill identifies Rabid, the second of Cronenberg’s films, as a sign of obvious growth and of bigger things to come. Chad talks about some of Cronenberg’s later films and the entire Grue-Crew review Ivan Reitman’s body of work as a producer. 

Rabid (1977) receives a unanimous recommendation from the 70s Grue-Crew and each of them is also looking forward to the release of the Soska sisters’ remake! At this writing, Rabid (1977) is available for streaming on Shudder and on Blu ray from Scream Factory. So listen to the podcast, watch Cronenberg’s original, then go see the Soska sisters’ remake. It’ll be fun. You know it will! 

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror 3-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In three weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Dan Curtis’ Trilogy of Terror (1975) starring Karen Black. 

For more on Rabid (1977), check out Paul Cardullo's review in Gruesome Magazine: https://gruesomemagazine.com/2016/11/20/rabid-1977-early-david-cronenberg-shows-hints-body-horrors-come/

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

 

Nov 14, 2019

"When the heliotrope starts growing among rough rocks and the full moon shines at night, in a certain area of the Earth, a man turns into a wolf." How could they forget the part where the man is bitten by a Yeti? Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they do their best to make sense of the mess known as Fury of the Wolfman (1972).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 106 – Fury of the Wolfman (1972)

Waldemar Daninsky, a lone survivor of a Tibetan expedition, returns home to find his wife has been unfaithful to him. Carrying the curse of the pentagram (or pentagon, as stated by the monk who nursed him back to health), the fury of the wolfman is unleashed! After disposing of his cheating spouse, he finds himself captive in a castle by a female mad scientist conducting mind control experiments. In a vain attempt at escape, he discovers the freaks leftover from past experiments dwelling in the dungeons.

- IMDb (Written by Humberto Amador)

 

Your loyal Grue-Crew thought it was high time to include a Paul Naschy film in the canon of 1970s icons they’ve discussed. Unfortunately, they chose Fury of the Wolfman, quite possibly the worst of Naschy’s films, even by his own account. Chad and Jeff are Naschy virgins and could not believe what they were seeing and hearing. The dubbed dialogue made so little sense, Jeff felt like he was watching something produced by the folks from the Bad Lip Reading website. Chad thought it might have been the longest 83 minutes of his life and admitted to being completely flummoxed. Doc and Bill spent much of the time discussing Naschy films they should have watched instead of Fury of the Wolfman. Understandably, the lot of them get sidetracked a few times in their discussion. In the end, they enjoying many of the practical effects including Naschy’s version of the wolfman makeup.

As tough as it was to watch, the 70s Grue-Crew had a great time discussing it and vow to cover another Naschy film within six months. If you are so inclined, a poor version of Fury of the Wolfman is currently available on Amazon Prime.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror 3-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In three weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be David Cronenberg’s Rabid (1977) starring Marilyn Chambers. 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Oct 23, 2019

"Yuko, I am your... [father]." No, this line is not from a Japanese foretelling of Return of the Jedi, but to quote Norman Bates, “Oh God, mother! Blood! Blood!” We’re talking a garden hose with a spray nozzle. Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they check out The Vampire Doll (1970), yet another vampire film (sort of), this time from Japan and Toho.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 105 – The Vampire Doll (1970

Keiko and her friend are trying to find her missing brother after he disappeared visiting his girlfriend Yuko.

- IMDb

 

The Vampire Doll, aka Legacy of Dracula, aka The Night of the Vampire, aka Bloodsucking Doll, aka Yûrei yashiki no kyôfu: Chi wo sû ningyô, aka ,,, well, you get the picture ... was the first of three Japanese vampire films released by Toho, the follow-ups being Lake of Dracula (1971) and Evil of Dracula (1974). The three films were packaged as The Bloodthirsty Trilogy in a 2018 Blu-ray release from Arrow Films.

Bill loves the beauty-mixed-with-evil exuding from the film’s “vampire” and points out the prevalence of deflating hands found in vampire “deaths” of the era. Chad wonders what disease makes Yûko’s fiance’s face look so nasty and is touched by Genzô’s loyalty and caring for Yûko and her mother. The relationships between the film’s characters aren’t clear to Doc, but it turns out his Grue-mates aren’t completely clear about them either. Jeff thinks highly of The Vampire Doll but still likes Lake of Dracula a little better. Of course, each of them got all glassy-eyed over the bloody finale. Who wouldn’t?

Check out Decades of Horror 1970s - Episode 86 - Lake of Dracula (1971) for more Gruesome Magazine content on The Bloodthirsty Trilogy. At this writing, the three films included in The Bloodthirsty Trilogy are all available to stream on Amazon Prime. Japanese vampires and Toho! If you haven’t seen them, what are you waiting for?

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror 3-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In three weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Fury of the Wolfman (1972) with Paul Naschy. 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at docrotten@decadesofhorror.com

Oct 5, 2019

"Death is not the worst. There are things more horrible than death." Was Count Dracula talking about working with Mr. Kinski? Oh, wait. He was Mr. Kinski! Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they check out yet another 1979 film telling the story of the undead count, Werner Herzog’s Nosferatu the Vampyre starring Klaus Kinski, Isabelle Adjani, and Bruno Ganz.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 104 – Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979)

Count Dracula moves from Transylvania to Wismar, spreading the Black Plague across the land. Only a woman pure of heart can bring an end to his reign of horror.

- IMDb

 

What do you know? The Decades of Horror 1970s Grue-Crew takes on another vampire film from 1979. Doc thinks Kinski’s Nosferatu is lacking a certain force of personality. (Pssst! He actually uses a couple of very different words.) Roland Topor’s portrayal of Renfield trips Chad’s trigger, especially with his laugh. Jeff is impressed with Herzog’s cinematic eye and compares some of the scenes in Nosferatu the Vampyre with those of Nosferatu (1922). Bill gives his views on Kinski the man and Kinski the actor - hint: they are not the same - and discusses the differences in the story as told in Nosferatu the Vampyre and in the story as told in other Dracula films. Of course, their appreciation of Isabelle Adjani goes without saying, but don’t get them started on Herzog’s version of Van Helsing!

All-in-all, the 70s Grue-Crew thinks Nosferatu the Vampyre is a must-watch for most horror fans. Listeners might also want to check out Decades of Horror: The Classic Era Episode 21 - Nosferatu (1922).

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror 3-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In three weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be - yes, it’s another vampire film - The Vampire Doll (1970), the first film in Toho’s Bloodthirsty Trilogy

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Sep 11, 2019

"In the past 500 years, Professor, those who have crossed my path have all died, and some not pleasantly." Then again, some who have crossed his path have watched him turn into a cloak-kite and flap away. Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they check out the 1979 version of Dracula, featuring Frank Langella, Kate Nelligan, Laurence Olivier, and Donald Pleasence, four decades after its release.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 103 – Dracula (1979)

In 1913, the charming, seductive and sinister vampire Count Dracula travels to England in search of an immortal bride.

IMDb

 

1979 saw the release of a veritable colony of vampire movies. John Badham’s Dracula most certainly comes in as number one in terms of budget though maybe not in terms of a timeless treasure. This one holds a special place for Doc as does Frank Langella’s portrayal of the legendary count. Jeff labored to stay focused during the first half of the film but gives high marks to the final half. As a youngster watching this, Chad was duly frightened but admits parts of it do not hold up forty years later. Bill is irritated Dracula omits nearly everything taking place prior to the Demeter landing in England and bemoans the very weird, “vampire kite” conclusion. 

Where does Dracula (1979) fit amongst other films based on Bram Stoker’s novel or even amongst vampire films in general? The 1970s Grue Crew is just foolhardy enough to take a shot at a general ranking. At any rate, they all recommend Dracula as a worthwhile watch and Doc is considering acquiring the Scream Factory Blu-ray due out in November 2019.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

Aug 21, 2019

"My brother always makes me wear this stupid mask. Do you know why? Because I'm prettier than him." There is no doubt, he is far prettier than his brother! Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they visit Mr. Slausen’s Lost Oasis in Tourist Trap, the film which Stephen King says, “wields an eerie, spooky power.”

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 102 – Tourist Trap (1979)

Teenagers come across a shut-in psychopath with telekinetic powers. He proceeds to use these powers to slay them one by one as well as animate the various mannequins he uses to keep himself company.

IMDb

 

Your Decades of Horror 1970s Grue Crew all agree Tourist Trap is an underrated film. In fact, they all admit to paying it little heed in passing until they took a closer look for this podcast. Bill brings up Pino Donaggio’s quirky score and Robert Burns’ art direction and mask designs as contributing factors to the film’s creepiness. The first kill scene really got to Chad as Woody meets his demise in a seemingly abandoned gas station and don’t even mention the hands! Jeff gives some background on Chuck Connors’ athletic exploits prior to becoming an actor and points out an early uncredited role for scream queen Linnea Quigly.

The Grue Crew give Tourist Trap a solid recommendation with the following caveat: be prepared to watch a very odd film. Despite its oddness, you will be watching a very creepy and powerful take on slasher films in this hidden gem from 1979.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

 

Jul 23, 2019

"Let it be known, sons and daughters, that Satan was an acid-head. Drink from his cup. Pledge yourselves. And together, we'll aaaalll freak out!" And indeed, your Grue-Crew did freak out. Join your faithful Grue Crew - Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr - as they kick off their next one-hundred episodes with this truly wondrous, groovy, and gory film from 1970, I Drink Your Blood!

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 101 – I Drink Your Blood (1970)

A band of satanist hippies roll into a town and begin terrorizing the local folk. They rape a local girl and her grandpa goes after them. He fails and is given LSD. This bothers his grandson and he gets back at the hippies by feeding them meat pies infected with blood from a rabid dog. They turn into crazed lunatics and begin killing and/or infecting everything in their path.

IMDb

 

Not surprisingly, there is a lot to say about I Drink Your Blood and the 70s Grue-Crew is up to the task. Bill proclaims that with the right distribution and marketing, this film might have been as influential as Night of the Living Dead. The memory of The Black Saint is invoked by Chad as he recounts how Santos talked of the giant syringe that came with a special edition of I Drink Your Blood, just in case you needed to inject someone’s food (meat pies work the best) with the blood of some rabid animal. Doc has an unusual interpretation of the “foaming-at-the-mouth” effect used by the filmmakers but the rest of the Grue-Crew really don’t want to go there. The opening scene, including the strategically placed sword hilt, was all Jeff needed to see to go all-in on I Drink Your Blood. They universally proclaim the boy as the best character in the film as he unintentionally wreaks havoc on the local citizenry while seeking revenge on the satanist hippies.

Your Grue-Crew highly recommends I Drink Your Blood, but cautions that there are a lot of different versions out there. Even the version on Shudder is missing a couple of key scenes. Doc and Chad viewed a version on Youtube that seems to be the most complete and includes a final scene that is much truer to the decade’s vibe.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at docrotten@decadesofhorror.com.

 

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