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Now displaying: Category: Decades of Horror 1970s
Jun 7, 2023

“Right! Bring in the perverts” They always make for a good police lineup. Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr – as they get their Giallo on with Dario Argento’s first shot at directing, The Bird with the Crystal Plumage (1970).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 190 – The Bird with the Crystal Plumage (1970)

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An American expatriate in Rome attempts to unmask a serial killer he witnessed in the act of attempted murder – and is now hunting him and his girlfriend.

 

With his first feature directorial effort, modern horror master Dario Argento immediately showed off his skill, precision, and artistry. Often looked upon as the rise in popularity for Giallo films, The Bird with the Crystal Plumage (1970) would set the bar for all the pre-slasher killer mystery thrillers for over a decade even giving the father of the subgenre, Mario Bava (The Girl Who Too Much, 1963; Blood and Black Lace, 1964), a run for his money. While Argento adapts many influences into his first of a series of films known as the “Animal Trilogy,” along with The Cat o’ Nine Tails (1971) and Four Flies on Grey Velvet (1971), his film would in turn influence many films for decades to come. Some of those films would be directed by his peers such as Bava and Lucio Fulci. Others who would pay homage would be the likes of Carpenter and de Palma. Jeff, Doc, Bill, and Chad gather to discuss the film, its creators, and its mark on the genre.  

At the time of this writing, The Bird with the Crystal Plumage is available to stream on a multitude of streaming and PPV services including Kanopy, Tubi, Prime Video, and Screambox to name a few.  The film is also available as a Blu-ray and as a 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray from Arrow Video.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode, chosen by Chad, will be The Dunwich Horror (1970). Yog-Sothoth, anyone?

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com. 

May 24, 2023

“I … I should never have come with you. We’re going to be killed. We’re going to be killed. I hear the demons of the red moon like the other time. I know they’re here. We’re going to die. AAYYIIIEEE!” Yup. In hindsight, bad decision. Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr – as they make their first trip to the Himalayan Mountains (just kidding, it’s really Spain) to catch Paul Naschy taking another turn as Waldemar Daninsky in The Werewolf and the Yeti(1975).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 189 – The Werewolf and the Yeti (1975)

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Waldemar, the renowned adventurer, joins an expedition to find the Yeti in the Himalayas. While hiking the mountains, he’s captured by two cannibalistic demon nymphets guarding a remote Buddhist temple and becomes their sex slave. They transform him into a werewolf setting him loose to roam the mountain where he encounters a sadistic bandit.

The Grue-Crew return to another Waldemar Daninsky werewolf adventure featuring the Spanish horror icon, Paul Naschy, in The Werewolf and the Yeti (1975, aka La maldición de la bestiaNight of the Howling BeastThe Curse of the Beast). For this installment, Waldemar gets a new “origin” to his cursed lycanthropy. We follow him to Tibet in search of the mysterious and elusive Yeti; instead, he finds a string of monsters and madmen to best before finally facing the Yeti himself: two cannibalistic cavewomen, the villainous Sekkar Khan, and his ruthless bandits. Blood, nudity, and the Wolfman – what else do you need? Maybe, more Yeti? Join the crew as they revisit this misbegotten and misunderstood Naschy gem. 

At the time of this writing, The Werewolf and the Yeti is available to stream under one of its titles on Tubi, Plex, and Shout! Factory TV. It is also available on Blu-ray from Scream! Factory as part of The Paul Naschy Collection II. Other films in the collection are Hunchback of the Morgue (1973, El jorobado de la Morgue), The Devil’s Possessed (1974, El mariscal del infierno), Exorcism (1975, Exorcismo), and A Dragonfly for Each Corpse (1975, Una libélula para cada muerto).

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode, chosen by Bill, will be Dario Argento’s first directorial effort, The Bird with the Crystal Plumage (1970, L’uccello dalle piume di cristallo). There’s always room for Giallo!

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com. 

May 10, 2023

“Nothing is too vile. Nothing is too dreadful, too awful. You need to know the terror, the horror, Lorrimor. You need to feel the thrill of disgust, the beauty of obscenity.” Oh, Freddie Jones, you had me at vile. Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr – as they do a ride-along with Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee for their last Hammer film together, The Satanic Rites of Dracula (1973).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 188 – The Satanic Rites of Dracula (1973)

Join the Crew on the Gruesome Magazine YouTube channel!
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In 1974, Scotland Yard believes it has uncovered a case of vampirism, so they call in veteran vampire researcher Professor Lorrimer Van Helsing.

 

It’s time to cover the final pairing of Peter Cushing as Van Helsing and Christopher Lee as Count Dracula in Count Dracula and His Vampire Bride! Wait, no… The Satanic Rites of Dracula (1973). Two years after the events of Dracula A.D. 1972, Cushing’s Van Helsing discovers Lee’s Dracula is still alive… and living in London… (see what I did there) and is now a wealthy CEO. But, he still has dastardly plans in his cape. Ironically, while this film did not land state-side until 1978 keeping U.S. fans waiting, it is now, sadly, in the public domain… sigh. Regardless, if you watch a sharp HD cut from an original print, you can catch glimpses of the powerhouse horror film company Hammer used to be as Helsing and crew literally use every method possible to dispose of the vampires lurking about. C’mon, despite its questionable quality, you gotta see this.

At the time of this writing, The Satanic Rites of Dracula is available to stream from the Roku Channel, Tubi, Popcornflix, Freevee, Screambox, and a variety of PPV sources. It is also available on Blu-ray from Warner Archives.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode, chosen by Jeff, will be Paul Naschy’s The Werewolf and the Yeti (1975). Or is it Night of the Howling Beast? Or La maldición de la bestia? Or Il licantropo e lo yeti? Or Horror of the Werewolf? Or The Curse of the Beast? Or Hall of the Mountain King? Anyhoo, have you seen any of these?

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com. 

Apr 26, 2023

“I do not belong on this mission, and I want to return to Earth!” Would a free beach ball change your mind? Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr – as they fly into John Carpenter’s first film, Dark Star (1974), which was born as a student project and nurtured into a feature film by Carpenter, co-writer Dan O’Bannon, and executive producer Jack Harris.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 187 – Dark Star (1974)

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In the far reaches of space, a small crew, 20 years into their solitary mission, find things beginning to go hilariously wrong.

 

Here’s a doozy for all of you John Carpenter fans out there. And, let’s not forget Dan O’Bannon and Jack Harris. This is it, John Carpenter’s first directorial effort, straight out of college (literally), the sci-fi comedy, Dark Star (1974). Strong Stanley Kubrick influences abound from Dr. Strangelove… (1964) to  2001: A Space Odyssey (1968). You don’t have to look too closely to see the elements that leap from this film into Dan O’Bannon’s Alien (1979) script. In fact, Aliens (1986), directed by James Cameron, pays homage to this film with its famous knife challenge gag. Rough around the edges for certain, Dark Star still manages to entertain and provide a chuckle or two. Check out what the Grue Crew thinks. Strap in and may the beach ball alien be with you!

At the time of this writing, Dark Star is available to stream from most free w/ads, subscription, and PPV sources. It is also available on Blu-ray from VCI Video.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode, chosen by Doc, will be Hammer’s The Satanic Rites of Dracula (1973). Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee for the win!

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com. 

Apr 12, 2023

“The only good thing about this port is the inn of Abu Jamil the Squint, who, for six months, I have been dreaming of his roasted sheep’s eyes.” Ah, yes. Who wouldn’t sail the seven seas for roasted sheep’s eyes? Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr – as they take in the third of Ray Harryhausen’s three Sinbad films, Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger(1977).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 186 – Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger (1977)

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Sinbad The Sailor sails to deliver a cursed prince to a dangerous island in the face of deadly opposition from a powerful witch.

 

Are you ready for more Ray Harryhausen? More Sindbad? Maybe you prefer Patrick Wayne or Jane Seymour? Regardless, the Grue-Crew set sail for Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger (1977) on the latest episode of Decades of Horror 1970s. The stop-motion creatures for the third Harryhausen Sinbad film include the Troglodyte, the Minoton (a magical large bronze minotaur brought to life by an evil witch), a large baboon, a large wasp, a giant walrus, a trio of “ghouls,” and a sabretooth tiger. The film is full of crappy dialog, rough editing, lackluster direction, and wooden acting… all saved by Harryhausen’s wonderful effects work. Let’s dive in!

You might find these other Decades of Horror episodes on Ray Harryhausen films interesting:

At the time of this writing, Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger is available to stream from Crackle, Cultpix, Fubo TV, and various PPV sources. It is also available on Blu-ray as a stand-alone from Indicator or as part of Ray Harryhausen – The Ultimate 7 Film Collection from Via Vision.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode, chosen by Chad, will be John Carpenter’s Dark Star (1974). That should be a fun one!

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com. 

Mar 29, 2023

“You know, it used to be in the old days, we would just take someone like you in an alley and blow their brains out.” While you eat lightning and crap thunder? Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr – as they take a ride-along with David Carradine and Sylvester Stallone in Roger Corman’s Death Race 2000 (1975). Vroom, vroom!

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 185 – Death Race 2000 (1975)

Join the Crew on the Gruesome Magazine YouTube channel!
Subscribe today! And click the alert to get notified of new content!
https://youtube.com/gruesomemagazine

In a dystopian future, a cross-country automobile race requires contestants to run down innocent pedestrians to gain points that are tallied based on each kill’s brutality.

Join the Grue-Crew as they revisit the campy sci-fi smash-em-up, Death Race 2000 (1975), from Roger Corman’s New World Pictures and director Paul Bartel. The film stars David Carradine (as Frankenstein) opposite pre-Rocky Sylvester Stallone (as Joe “Machine Gun” Viterbo) in the dystopian “future” of the year 2000, a time when Americans root for their favorite drivers as they race from New York to New Los Angeles mowing down civilians along the way for points. Machine Gun Viterbo is out for blood while Frankenstein has other plans. Let the shenanigans begin.

At the time of this writing, Death Race 2000 is available to stream from Tubi, Popcornflix, Cultpix, and PPV from Apple TV. 

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode, chosen by Bill, will be Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger (1977), showcasing Ray Harryhausen’s genius, Jane Seymour, Patrick Troughton, and . . . Patrick Wayne? That should be interesting.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com. 

Mar 15, 2023

“What was that maniac drinking? Tastes like the Volga river at low tide!” Muddy water turned to wine? Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr – as they check out the Tanned One as the undead Count in Love at First Bite (1979).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 184 – Love at First Bite (1979)

Join the Crew on the Gruesome Magazine YouTube channel!
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When the Communist regime ejects the Count from his ancestral home, he and Renfield go in search of the current incarnation of Dracula’s true love, a fashion model living in New York City. The Count finds it difficult to adjust to life in the Big Apple in the late 1970s, but true love triumphs in the end.

 

Join Doc, Jeff, Bill, and Chad as they go disco dancing with George Hamilton’s Count Dracula as they review Love at First Bite (1979). For a time, this comedic take on Bram Stoker’s Dracula was the highest-grossing independent film of all time. But, it is actually… funny and the Grue-Crew are here to share their thoughts. If nothing else, it has a great cast. Alongside Hamilton are Susan Saint James, Richard Benjamin, Arte Johnson (doing his best Dwight Frye!), and Dick Shawn. Enjoy!

At the time of this writing, Love at First Bite is available to stream from YouTube and on a Scream Factory Blu-ray disc as a double feature with Once Bitten (1985).

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode, chosen by Jeff, will be Death Race 2000 (1975) starring David Carradine, Simone Griffeth, Sylvester Stallone, Mary Woronov, and Martin Kove. Roger Corman is the producer so you know stuff is gonna ‘splode.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Mar 1, 2023

“Yeah, you know, always on a full moon, the pigs get hungry. … They got used to eating human flesh. … You know the first time it happened was an accident. They got loose in the field. There was a drunk. He was asleep. Yeah, he was asleep.” Yeah. That’s right. An accident. It was all an accident. Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr – as they check out Pigs (1973), a bit of a vanity project, written and directed by Marc Lawrence for his daughter, Toni.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 183 – Pigs (1973)

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The owner of a roadside diner and his new helper kill people and feed them to pigs.

 

What film would you rather see? Pigs or Daddy’s Deadly Darling? Yeah, it’s a toss-up. Thankfully, they’re the same film. Woot! Daddy’s deadly darling is a bit mad, you see. She whacks anyone she dislikes and then feeds them to the pigs. Or,… are they turned into pigs? Nah, just old-fashioned, psychotic murder and body disposal here. Check out what the Grue-Crew thinks of this multi-titled, muti-released, and multi-edited 70s flick!

At the time of this writing, Pigs is available to stream from the Classic Horror Movie Channel, PLEX, Cultpix, and Amazon (PPV). A Blu-ray disc of Pigs is available from Vinegar Syndrome.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule, chosen by Doc, will be Love at First Bite (1979), featuring Geroge Hamilton as the undead Count and Susan Saint James as his ideal inamorata.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Feb 1, 2023

“Not your baby! Our baby! Satan’s baby!!” You seemed like a folksy small-town doctor but it turns out, you’re really the head, satanic dude. Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr – as they check out The Brotherhood of Satan (1971), a Black Saint favorite from the producing team (L.Q. Jones and Alvy Moore) that brought you A Boy and His Dog (1975).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 181 – The Brotherhood of Satan (1971)

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A family is trapped in a desert town by a cult of senior citizens who recruit the town’s children to worship Satan.

Back in the fall of 2013, just prior to launching Gruesome Magazine, Doc’s cohost on Horror News Radio, Santos Ellin, Jr., The Black Saint, joined him on the Monster Movie Podcast to discuss their favorite films of the Seventies. Exploring two films from each year between 1970 and 1979, this two-episode retrospective would give birth to Decades of Horror 1970s.

For the year 1971, Santos picked The Brotherhood of Satan featuring Strother Martin, L.Q. Jones, Alvy Moore, and Charles Bateman. At long last, the Grue-Crew set their eyes on this often overlooked classic. The film holds up amazingly well over 50 years later, spotlighting Martin chewing the scenery in style and featuring some impressive cinematography. Seriously, only Strother Martin can handle dialog such as this and keep a straight face while delivering these lines and looking so menacing.

At the time of this writing, The Brotherhood of Satan is available to stream from Tubi and a variety of other PPV options. Regarding physical media, the film is currently available as a Blu-ray from Arrow Video.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule, chosen by Bill, will be The Ghoul (1975), a Tyburn Films production directed by Freddie Francis starring Peter Cushing, Veronica Carlson, and John Hurt. Gotta be good, right?

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Jan 18, 2023

“I was kicked out of the church. I drank too much. I lusted. I was an adulterer… and other things.”  Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr – as they take on yet another made-for-TV horror movie, The Possessed (1977). Pssst . . . this one has some surprises in the cast.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 180 – The Possessed (1977)

Join the Crew on the Gruesome Magazine YouTube channel!
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A former priest, now an exorcist, battles the Satanic forces that are threatening the students at a school for girls.

 

Made-for-TV horror movies in the Seventies are the go-to for any monster kids growing up during that time, gathering around the tube with the family to watch chilling favorites such as The Night Stalker (1972), Duel (1971), Gargoyles (1972), and Trilogy of Terror (1975). Whoa boy, those were the times. Many a time the film was to serve as a pilot for a TV series ala Kolchak. With a familiar cast (P.J. Soles, James Farentino, Joan Hackett, and more), The Possessed (1977) would make an attempt at such a lofty goal only to miss the mark. Regardless, those who saw the film may remember the nail-spitting, cackling creepy lady at the end, or fans of Indiana Jones and Han Solo star Harrison Ford may seek this one out to catch his last role prior to Star Wars (1977). Sadly, time has not been kind to this post-Exorcist attempt at the supernatural but the Grue-Crew review it all the same.

At the time of this writing, The Possessed is available to stream from YouTube. In terms of physical media, the film is currently available as a DVD from the Warner Brothers Archive Collection.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be The Brotherhood of Satan (1971), from the production company that brought you A Boy and His Dog (1975), starring Strother Martin, L.Q. Jones, Alvy Moore, Charles Bateman, and Ahna Capri.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com. 

Jan 4, 2023

“Over 50 years ago, Bram Stoker wrote the greatest of all horror stories. Now, for the first time, we retell exactly as he wrote, one of the first – and still the best – tales of the macabre.” Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr – as they get sucked into their first film directed by Jess Franco, Count Dracula (1970), starring no less than Christopher Lee, Herbert Lom, and Klaus Kinski.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 179 – Count Dracula (1970)

Join the Crew on the Gruesome Magazine YouTube channel!
Subscribe today! And click the alert to get notified of new content!
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Count Dracula, a gray-haired vampire who regains his youth by dining on the blood of maidens, is pursued in London and Transylvania by Professor Van Helsing, Jonathan Harker, and Quincey Morris after he victimizes them and their loved ones.

 

Sir Christopher Lee is perhaps the best Dracula on film. (Okay, you could argue Bela Lugosi – that’s fair.) He’s most famous for playing the Count in the series of Hammer films from (Horror of) Dracula (1958) to The Satanic Rites of Dracula (1973). However, he also teamed up with Jess Franco to deliver a “truer” adaptation of the Bram Stoker novel in Count Dracula (1970). Notable actors Herbert Lom and Klaus Kinski are also on board as Van Helsing and Renfield respectively. So, how does this version stand up against the Hammer Horror films and the Universal Monster movies? The 70s Grue-Crew is here to find out and they are pleasantly surprised . . . for the most part.

At the time of this writing, Count Dracula is available to stream from Wicked Horror TV, Tubi, Kanopy, Crackle, Plex, Crackle, Filmzie, and various PPV options. In terms of physical media, the film is currently available as a Blu-ray from Severin.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be The Possessed (1977), another one of those TV horror movies of the 1970s. You might recognize some of the cast.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Dec 12, 2022

“Dang creature . . . I’m gonna get my shotgun and make a rug outta that damn thing!” And Jack Elam is just the one who can do it! Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr – as they make a trip to the bayou to check out Creature from Black Lake (1976) and its new Synapse Films Blu-ray, released December 13, 2022. It’s a beauty!

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 178 – Creature from Black Lake (1976)

Join the Crew on the Gruesome Magazine YouTube channel!
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Two young students from the University of Chicago hear of the mysterious happenings at Black Lake and armed with a van packed with scientific equipment set out to solve the mystery.

 

To begin with, your Decades of Horror 1970s Grue Crew are universally impressed with the quality in the look and sound of the new Synapse Films Blu-ray release of Creature from Black Lake. In the past, many of the crew had seen the film in a cropped, pan-and-scan version on TV or videotape. They discovered that Creature from Black Lake is an excellent movie that had been marred by the poor quality of many of the prints to which they had access. The Synapse Blu-ray release is a great showcase for Dean Cundy’s cinematography and facilitates a far more enjoyable viewing experience. As far as bigfoot movies of the era, Creature from Black Lake moves to the top among a select few. Synapse did a great service to horror fans in restoring Creature from Black Lake to this pristine, widescreen format.

After gushing over the Synapse Blu-ray, the Grue-Crew gushes equally over the movie itself. A great cast of character actors led by Jack Elam, Dub Taylor, Bill Thuman, Dennis Fimple, and John David Carson, supported by a well-cast group of locals, makes Creature from Black Lake a heck of a fun watch. In fact, they were having so much fun, they forgot to mention that Cathryn Hartt (credited as Catherine McClenny), who played Eve-the-waitress, is Morgan Fairchild’s sister. And be assured, there are plenty of creature shenanigans to supply the tension required in a good bigfoot film. 

The crew’s thanks go out to Synapse Films for supplying them with the Blu-ray screeners! The official release date is Tuesday, December 13, 2022. You can purchase your copy at Creature from Black Lake (1080p Blu-ray + Limited Edition Slipcover) – Synapse Films. You know you want it!

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule will be Count Dracula (1970), directed by Jesús “Jess” Franco and starring Christopher Lee, Herbert Lom, Klaus Kinski, Maria Rohm, and Soledad Miranda. Yes, Grue Believers, this is their first Jess Franco movie.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com. 

Dec 7, 2022

“You’re a strange girl, Lizzie, one minute as hard and cold as a grave so, next as loving as any father could wish. Wonder what goes on in that mind of yours, I guess I’ll never know.” Actually, he’s about to find out right quick. Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr – as they check out the representation of the most infamous crime involving the numbers 40 and 41 as depicted in The Legend of Lizzie Borden (1975).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 177 – The Legend of Lizzie Borden (1975)

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Synopsis: In 1893 Massachusetts, Lizzie Andrew Borden is put on trial for murdering her father and stepmother with an axe.

 

The Legend of Lizzie Borden, an ABC Monday night movie of the week, is Bill’s pick. He’s always loved Elizabeth Montgomery and this film blew him away. He describes it as far creepier than most TV fare of the time and though the blood now seems understated, it was plenty enough for the time.

Learning it was a true story after hearing his mom recite the rhyme, Chad then watched The Legend of Lizzie Borden with his mom. It gave him nightmares as a youngster and though not as creepy now, it’s still a compelling thriller. Jeff points out the emphasis on women’s plight – their position in society of the time – given in The Legend of Lizzie Borden. He also loves the well-known character actors in the cast – Katherine Helmond, Fionnula Flanagan, Bonnie Bartlett, Ed Flanders, and Don Porter – and the first reappearance of Gloria Stuart after a 29-year absence from film.

The 70s Grue Crew gives unanimous praise to Elizabeth Montgomery for her Emmy-nominated performance and gives the movie a strong recommendation. As of this writing, The Legend of Lizzie Borden is available to stream from Amazon Prime.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule, in a departure from what was originally announced, will be Creature from Black Lake (1976) starring Jack Elam and Dub Taylor and featuring the cinematography of Dean Cundey.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com. 

Nov 23, 2022

“There’s a bald maniac in there, and he’s going bat shit!” Believe it or not, this is an accurate description of several scenes in this movie. Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr – as they check out this representative of the 70s LSD-scare hype, Blue Sunshine (1977) from Jeff Lieberman, the director of Squirm (1976).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 176 – Blue Sunshine (1977)

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A bizarre series of murders begins in Los Angeles, where people start going bald and then become homicidal maniacs. But could the blame rest on a particularly dangerous form of LSD called Blue Sunshine that the murderers took ten years before?

Blue Sunshine is a request from a Grue Believer that has popped on and off the 70s schedule depending on its streaming availability and that of other films on the Grue Crew’s list. At long last, it made it through to the recording schedule as Jeff’s pick for this episode and he is impressed with the surprisingly good cast of actors familiar to TV viewers of the time. He kind of likes the idea of the chromosome-altering, 10-year time bomb included in a designer version of LSD, and the trippy music – highly appropriate for the period and the subject – is to his liking. However, Zalman King’s overboard approach to method acting, though he’s directed to do so as a red herring, is off-putting. 

“The longest hour-and-a-half he’s had to sit through” is how Chad describes Blue Sunshine. He didn’t care for the story or the characters and Zalman King’s character’s lack of feeling for personal space is annoying as hell. On the plus side, he is hilariously amused by Ray Young’s portrayal of Wayne (or “Biff,” as Chad calls him) and his final rampage. Bill agrees with Chad on the unlikeability of King’s character calling his performance more like meth-head acting than method acting. He doesn’t buy into the conspiracy presented, but admits, Blue Sunshine is definitely a 70s film. Doc had a great time with Blue Sunshine. The bizarre and quirky lead, Bryon James flapping around, “Biff’s” murder spree, and the crazed bald maniac look are just a few of his trigger trippers in this movie.

Blue Sunshine certainly isn’t for everyone, but if you’re a director Jeff Lieberman (Squirm, 1976) completist or are in the mood for some LSD-fueled political intrigue dressed up as a horror movie, this should fit the bill. At the time of this writing, Blue Sunshine is available to stream from Shudder.

Be sure to check out The Black Saint’s and Doc Rotten’s take on Squirm in Decades of Horror 1970s #6!

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule, chosen by Bill, will be The Legend of Lizzie Borden (1975), an ABC TV movie of the week starring Elizabeth Montgomery. How does that go? Forty this and forty-one that or something like that?

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Nov 9, 2022

“I walked the streets, brooding on the bitter irony that all I wanted to do for humanity, for life, would be cheated by death… unless I could cheat death.” And eventually, he discovered… you can’t cheat a cheater. Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr – as they discuss Dr. Jekyll & Sister Hyde(1971), a Hammer film with a twist on the classic Robert Louis Stevenson story.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 175 – Dr. Jekyll & Sister Hyde (1971)

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A Victorian scientist tests a serum that transforms him into a sensuous murderess.

Bill describes Dr. Jekyll & Sister Hyde as a mid-level Hammer film searching for the magic mix that can reverse the company’s fortunes during the beginning of its decline. At the same time, he gives the filmmakers credit for their creativity and for the transformation scenes that, though not perfect, are well done. Dr. Jekyll & Sister Hyde was not at the top of the list of Hammer films he hadn’t yet seen, but Jeff’s glad he did experience it. He praises the filmmakers and actors for depicting the Jekyll and Hyde variations as somewhat androgynous, helping to make the transformations believable. He also likes the triple threat of Jekyll/Hyde, Jack the Ripper, and Burk & Hare nicely combined into one story by writer Brian Clemens. Doc, who chose Dr. Jekyll & Sister Hyde for this episode, also describes it as an example of Hammer reaching for some answers. To him, the way the film’s themes are handled doesn’t really hold up while admitting the failure might be a product of the times in which it was made. He also describes Dr. Jekyll as a role more complex than many, possibly making it Ralph Bates’ best Hammer role.

The 70s Grue-Crew universally laud Martine Beswick’s performance and lament the absence of any character in the film for which to root. For those wishing to watch, or rewatch, Dr. Jekyll & Sister Hyde, the film is available to stream from Tubi, Freevee, The Roku Channel, Peacock, Hoopla, and several PPV sources. The film is also available as a Blu-ray disc from Scream Factory. Of course, this information is as of the time of this writing.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule, chosen by Jeff, will be Blue Sunshine (1977). That one should be a fun trip. (See what I did there?)

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com. 

Oct 26, 2022

“That bugs me, man. That really bugs me.” This ends up being Glenn Ford’s key line in his short appearance in this episode’s movie. Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr – as they come away with a slew of questions after watching The Visitor (1979) and its star-studded cast.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 174 – The Visitor (1979)

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Synopsis: The soul of a young girl with telekinetic powers becomes the prize in a fight between forces of good and evil.

Chad chose The Visitor for this episode’s discussion, but he confesses that he had no idea what was going on at any given moment during the film. On top of his confusion with the storyline, he was “bored off his hindquarters” while some scenes dragged on forever and ever and ever… To him, it felt like a ripoff of The Exorcist (1973) and The Omen (1976) with a little science fiction twist thrown in. Of course, there was the hate-eliciting kid, dripping with evil, and the inappropriate music backing many scenes.

Though competently made, according to Bill, The Visitor is a mess. The incoherent story seemed to go a little Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) while still not making a lick of sense. Echoing Chad’s feelings about the kid, he admits he cheered when Shelley Winters’ character slapped her. He finishes with, “Of all the WTF 1970s movies we’ve done, this is the WTFest.”

Jeff agrees with Chad that The Visitor is way too long with what seemed like some endless sequences. Once he realized it was an Italian film, the presence of a confusing storyline kind of made sense. The second time he watched it the plot became somewhat less opaque, but he would never recommend that anyone else watch it twice.

The Visitor took some life out of Doc and made his brain hurt trying to figure out what was happening. For him, it plays a lot like Damien: Omen II (1978) with Lance Henriksen even playing a similar part. He also found some unintentionally comedic scenes and while the film has its moments, on the whole, he had to fight to not fall asleep.

Despite the 70s Grue-Crew’s poor impressions, The Visitor does have a cult following and sports an excellent cast that outperforms the material. At the time of this writing, The Visitor is available to stream from Shudder, Peacock, Kanopy, Tubi, and Freevee. The Visitor is also available on physical media as a Blu-ray from Drafthouse.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule, chosen by Doc, will be Hammer’s Dr. Jekyll & Sister Hyde (1971). That won’t be confusing at all.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com. 

Oct 12, 2022

“Trust in Allah! … but tie up your camel!” Always! Trust, but verify, right? Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr – as they revel in the wonder of Ray Harryhausen’s creations in The Golden Voyage of Sinbad(1973).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 173 – The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973)

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Sinbad and the vizier of Marabia, followed by evil magician Koura, seek the three golden tablets that can gain them access to the ancient temple of the Oracle of All Knowledge.

 

The Golden Voyage of Sinbad features the stop-motion animation of Ray Harryhausen and Caroline Munro so no one should be surprised that it is Bill’s pick. In fact, Ray Harryhausen is his hero and this is the movie that made him fall in love with moviemaking. He’s poured over the Kali scene frame-by-frame, over and over. He still can’t believe how cool everything is and how great it looks, loving it then and loving it now.

Jeff also digs The Golden Voyage of Sinbad, calling it his favorite of the Harryhausen adventure movies. It’s a better movie overall in his view and he appreciates Tom Baker’s turn as the film’s villain. Watching The Golden Voyage of Sinbad had reawakened Doc’s love of these movies. The special effects are seamlessly melded into the story, the villain is cool, the creatures are fun, and it is such a good time. 

The Golden Voyage of Sinbad is currently available to stream from Tubi and various PPV sources. It’s also available on Blu-ray as a stand-alone or as part of Ray Harryhausen – The Ultimate 7 Film Collection, both from ViaVision Entertainment/Madman/Columbia Pictures.

Also, check out our other Decades of Horror episodes on Ray Harryhausen films:

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule, chosen by Chad, will be The Visitor (1979), starring Glenn Ford, John Huston, Lance Henriksen, Shelley Winters, Mel Ferrer, and Sam Peckinpah.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com. 

Sep 28, 2022

“You’ve made an unbreakable vow. In the name of vengeance, you must foreswear all human emotions, all love and hate, everything.” Your basic all-inclusive vow, then? Got it. Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr – as they check out the major influence for Tarantino’s Kill Bill Duology, Lady Snowblood(1973).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 172 – Lady Snowblood (1973)

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Synopsis: A young woman is trained from birth to be a deadly instrument of revenge against the swindlers who destroyed her family

Lady Snowblood, the horror-adjacent inspiration for Tarantino’s Kill Bill: Vol. 1 (2003) & Kill Bill: Vol. 2 (2004), is Jeff’s pick and he loves this movie, describing it as a visual feast with a non-traditional story structure incorporating Japanese culture and history. It is so much fun!

Seeing Lady Snowblood for the first time with excellent visual quality, Bill is completely absorbed in the film. He was already familiar with the lead actress, Meiko Kaji, from Female Prisoner Scorpion: Jailhouse 41 (1972), which he also loved, and he loves her performance. It’s the kind of performance the viewer can read a lot into. He describes the character and Kaji’s performance as a female version of Clint Eastwood’s “man with no name.”

This is Doc’s first time watching Lady Snowblood and he falls in love with the movie. The simple story with an interesting structure, amazing sound effects, plenty of gore for the gorehounds out there, and the great screen presence of the lead actress all contribute to him cherishing every moment of Lady Snowblood.

You’ve probably guessed by now that the Decades of Horror 70s Grue Crew heartily recommend Lady Snowblood. At the time of this writing, it is available to stream from HBOmax, the Criterion Channel, and various PPV sources. In terms of physical media, it is available in The Complete Lady Snowblood (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray], which also includes Lady Snowblood 2: Love Song of Vengeance (1974). And if you are as infatuated with the acting of Meiko Kaji, you might want to check out her Female Prisoner series  – Female Prisoner #701: Scorpion (1972), Female Prisoner Scorpion: Jailhouse 41 (1972), Female Prisoner Scorpion: Beast Stable (1973), and Female Prisoner Scorpion: #701’s Grudge Song (1973) – all of which are currently available to stream from Shudder.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule, chosen by Bill, will be The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973. Ray Harryhausen, Caroline Munro, John Phillip Law, Takis Emmanuel, Tom Baker, Robert Shaw, and the usual assortment of stop-motion animation creatures? Oh yeah!

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com. 

Sep 14, 2022

“May God bless you. This message was pre-recorded and automatically programmed.” It’s so nice to know they gave it the personal touch. Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr – as they check out a nuclear apocalypse as imagined in Chosen Survivors (1974).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 171 – Chosen Survivors (1974)

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Synopsis: After being selected at random by a computer to seek safety in an underground bomb shelter on the eve of a nuclear attack, a group of refugees makes a horrible realization: They are sharing the space with a colony of vampire bats.

 

Chosen Survivor is a movie Grue-Believers will remember as one mentioned more than once by The Black Saint. It took the 70s Grue Crew a while, but they are finally covering it. Chad describes Chosen Survivors as an apocalyptic tale with cool actors that he kind of likes but with which he is also kind of bored to tears. In the end, he was hoping the bats would eat everyone. Chosen Survivors feels like a 70s TV movie to Bill and most of it looked to him almost like it was shot through gauze. On top of that, a fear of bats is not one of his phobias and the inaccuracy in the film’s depiction of vampire bats took him out of the movie.

Jeff thinks the Chosen Survivors has a lot of cool visuals despite the omnipresent soft focus. He enjoys it even though the plot is a bunch of nonsense and found it a little interesting in conjunction with the actual plan the government had formulated in the event of a nuclear apocalypse. The pure, 70s-gold cast is the high point for Doc. Describing Chosen Survivors as more science fiction than horror with reasons to like it, in the end, he admits it’s not very good.

If a group of people locked up in a facility far underground during a nuclear apocalypse while under attack by unnaturally behaving vampire bats is your thing, you need to check out Chosen Survivors. At the time of this writing, it is available to stream from YouTube and on physical media as a Kino Lorber Blu-ray.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule, chosen by Jeff, will be Lady Snowblood (1973), complete with swordplay and blood galore.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com. 

Aug 31, 2022

“This is the ant. Treat it with respect, for it may very well be the next dominant life form on our planet.” It seems we’re moving in that direction. Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr – as they shop for prime real estate in the Empire of the Ants (1977).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 170 – Empire of the Ants (1977)

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Con artist Marilyn Fryser tries to sell bogus real estate deals in an area overrun by giant ants.

IMDb

 

Chad chose Empire of the Ants, his second H. G. Wells-related pick in a row after The Island of Dr. Moreau (1977) in episode 166 and his second Bert I. Gordon pick after War of the Colossal Beast (1958) on episode 80 of Decades of Horror: The Classic Era. (This is also the second Bert I. Gordon film featured on Decades of Horror 1970s after Food of the Gods (1976) on episode 28.) Chad does recognize his hometown where some of Empire of the Ants is shot, but it is not a terribly good movie, just terrible. To him, it feels like a TV Movie of the Week. The nasty effects and nasty acting, however, are not counterbalanced by how big the ants are.

Robert Lansing is a plus for Jeff in Empire of the Ants but Joan Collins is a minus. Add in the terrible effects and jeff is in agreement with Chad. The movie is just terrible. Even though the movie is bad from its dreadful beginning to its terrible ending, Bill retains an affection for Bert I. Gordon and his work even though it doesn’t work well in Empire of the Ants. Waiting for a bunch of unlikable characters to start dying is a bit of a drag. Doc is on board with the TV-movie-of-the-week feel to Empire of the Ants, adding that it is just bad and boring. To him, it seems workmanlike, but there is no pizazz to hold a viewer’s interest. This one definitely fits into the “not-so-good” classification.

The Grue-Crew also go through some feedback, during which they promised to provide the link to Grue-Believer Scott’s “erratically published” blog, so here it is. Check out his musings at  Saturday Mad Theater.

If for any reason imaginable, you’re looking for a way to watch Empire of the Ants, as of this writing, it is streaming from Plex w/ads and as PPV from Apple TV and Amazon.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule, chosen by Doc, will be Chosen Survivors (1974), a film oft mentioned by The Black Saint, starring Jackie Cooper, Bradford Dillman, Richard Jaeckel, Gwenn Mitchell, Lincoln Kilpatrick, Barbara Babcock, Diana Muldaur, and Alex Cord.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Aug 17, 2022

“You know, my son, I wouldn’t be Emperor of the Galaxy if I didn’t have some powers at my disposal. Imperial Battleship, halt the flow of time!” Yup. That could come in handy. Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr – as they check out Starcrash (1978), starring Caroline Munro, Christopher Plummer, Marjoe Gortner, David Hasselhoff, and Joe Spinell. What’s not to like?

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 169 – Starcrash (1978)

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An outlaw smuggler and her alien companion are recruited by the Emperor of the Galaxy to rescue his son and destroy a mysterious superweapon designed by the evil Count Zarth Arn

Bill picked this one and he remembers originally liking Starcrash a lot more than he does this time around. Caroline Munro is still fetching, even though Candy Clark dubs her, but every actor seems to be acting in a different movie. There is a colorful, comic-book style to this weird oddball movie, but as Bill points out, sometimes you can’t go back again.

Jeff has been wanting to see Starcrash since Decades of Horror 1980s covered Maniac, another film starring Caroline Munro and Joe Spinell. Jeff sees the obvious similarities to the recently released Star Wars (1977), but the bad dialogue and long, drawn-out fight scenes cause Starcrash to… crash. Doc remembers great-looking stills in magazines of the time, but their quality does not lead to a good film. The dubbing is laughably bad and the movie is just awful. Still, there is a sort of weird charm to it.

If you have a hankering for late-70s, cheesy, space opera, Starcrash is available to stream with ads from multiple services, and on physical media as a Shout Factory! Blu-ray.

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule, chosen by Chad, will be H. G. Wells’ Empire of the Ants (1977), starring Joan Collins and Robert Lansing.

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Aug 3, 2022

“She is a sad romantic woman. She will fall in love with me. Then I will sacrifice her on the next full moon.” So says the Wolf Man wearing a gold, silk, disco shirt. Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr – as they check out the monster-filled world of luchadors enmascarado (masked wrestlers) in Santo and Blue Demon vs. Dracula and the Wolf Man (Santo y Blue Demon Contra Dracula y el Hombre Lobo, 1973).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 168 – Santo and Blue Demon vs. Dracula and the Wolf Man (1973)

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Synopsis: Masked wrestling champion and occasional crime fighter El Santo once again saves Mexico from the ravages of undying monsters in this blend of grappling and horror. While the great fighter is busy in the ring, two legendary monsters, the vampire Dracula and a werewolf named Rufus Rex are brought back to life by his enemies. As the monsters roam free and threaten the life of El Santo’s closest friends, he teams up with fellow wrestling icon Blue Demon to vanquish the creatures once and for all.

 

Santo and Blue Demon vs. Dracula and the Wolf Man is Jeff’s pick. He was turned on to the El Santo films by Joseph Perry, one of the founding hosts of Decades of Horror: The Classic Era and though it took him a while to get into the feel of the films, he loves them unabashedly now.

Bill likes any creator who lives the role and you can’t live the role any more than the luchadors enmascarado do. They even kiss their girlfriends with the mask on. You gotta love that! And just for kicks, the film opens and closes with wrestling matches. Chad has always enjoyed these movies and is impressed by the production values and vivid colors in this entry in the El Santo canon. And, as always, he digs the monsters and the wrestling. Once he warmed up to it, Doc had a great time with Santo and Blue Demon vs. Dracula and the Wolf Man as well. He admits that it takes a special mindset to enjoy these, the dumbest but most fun, movies. 

Once you learn to love these films you won’t be able to get enough of them. Santo and Blue Demon vs. Dracula and the Wolf Man is available to stream from Tubi and Amazon Prime as PPV, and on physical media as one of the titles included in “Santo: El Enmascarado De Plata” Blu-ray Boxset from VCI Entertainment.

If you’d like to hear other Decades of Horror podcast episodes featuring the great El Santo, check these out:

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans: comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Jul 20, 2022

“She is a disturbing child.” It doesn’t reach the heights of his USS Indianapolis monologue in Jaws, but Robert Shaw delivers this line with grim resignation. Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr – as they check out A Reflection of Fear (1972), a relatively unknown film starring Sondra Locke, Robert Shaw, and Sally Kellerman.

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 167 – A Reflection of Fear (1972)

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A disturbed young girl starts believing that there is something very sinister at work after her estranged father visits her at her mother and grandmother’s house with the woman he plans to marry.

 

Doc chose A Reflection of Fear for the Jaws connection delivered by Robert Shaw in his starring role. He admits it’s kind of a stupid movie but he still enjoyed it for its 70s flavor. There are a few creepy elements present and he really likes Shaw’s and Sondra Locke’s performances.

Chad took one look at the cast and thought A Reflection of Fear would be a great movie, but instead, he is very bored with it all. Even though he loves Shaw and Locke in it, and yes, there were some creepy parts, he was expecting a whole lot more than a predictable twist. A Reflection of Fear got under Bill’s skin a little, but the two twists really date the movie. He thinks Sondra Locke is a perfect choice for her role and that Robert Shaw is terrific but there just isn’t enough there to maintain interest. Jeff doesn’t buy Sondra Locke as the teenager she is playing and points out some huge continuity jumps in a couple of the film’s edits. He enjoyed Sally Kellerman’s and Mitchell Ryan’s performances the most, but not enough to become a fan of A Reflection of Fear.

Your 1970s Grue Crew has a fairly lukewarm reaction to A Reflection of Fear, but if you are so inclined, it is available for viewing. At the time of this writing, the movie can be streamed from Tubi.

If you’re craving some more Shaw sauce to top off your summer, now would be a great time to revisit the Decades of Horror 1970s 2-part episode on Jaws! You can check it out here:

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule, chosen by Jeff, will be Santo and Blue Demon vs. Dracula and the Wolf Man (1973). 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com. 

Jul 6, 2022

“His is the hand that makes. His is the hand that hurts. His is the hand that heals. His is the House of Pain. He who breaks the law shall be punished back to the House of Pain.” And you definitely don’t want to go to the House of Pain. Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr – as they take another trip to the tropics to visit H. G. Wells’ The Island of Dr. Moreau (1977).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 166 – The Island of Dr. Moreau (1977)

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Synopsis: A shipwrecked survivor discovers a remote island owned by a crazed scientist who is carrying out sinister experiments on the island’s inhabitants.

Chad picked The Island of Dr. Moreau because it “wowed” him as a kid. Watching it now, he can see its flaws but still likes it. Burt Lancaster, Michael York, and the Humanimal special effects makeup are high points for him.

Jeff loved the book and was irritated by the plot changes in this movie version when he first saw it in the theater back in the day. Now, the first half seems like a lot of running through the jungle, but the tension ramps up as soon as Moreau begins transforming Michael York’s character. When he first saw the movie, Bill had read the Marvel comic book and was bitterly disappointed that the ending of the film had been cut and didn’t match the Marvel version. For him, The Island of Dr. Moreau is not terrible but will always reside in the shadow of Island of Lost Souls (1932). He also laments that most of the story takes place in the daylight which hurts the makeup effects. When he first saw The Island of Dr. Moreau, Doc was not a fan and his opinion has not changed. While he appreciates the effort and the cast, it just seems like a weak sauce compared to the gravitas of Island of Lost Souls.

Despite the 70s Grue-Crew’s lukewarm reception, they all agree that The Island of Dr. Moreau is worth a watch. At the time of this writing, the film can be streamed from Tubi and several PPV sources. The film doesn’t appear to be currently available on domestically produced physical media.

If you’re a fan of H. G. Wells’ work, check out these other Decades of Horror episodes:

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule, chosen by Doc, will be A Reflection of Fear (1973) starring Sondra Locke, Robert Shaw, and Sally Kellerman. 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com.

Jun 21, 2022

“They had their chance to learn about my ideas 15 years ago. *evil chuckle* Now they’ll pay for their scorn! I’ll exact vengeance upon those fools who treated me like a madman and drove me into the shadows! *maniacal laugh*” And with the help of his robotic daughter! Join your faithful Grue Crew – Doc Rotten, Chad Hunt, Bill Mulligan, and Jeff Mohr – as they go to Toho-land for Ishirô Honda’s Terror of Mechagodzilla (1975).

Decades of Horror 1970s
Episode 165 – Terror of Mechagodzilla (1975)

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Subscribe today! And click the alert to get notified of new content!
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Attempts to salvage Mechagodzilla are thwarted, causing an INTERPOL investigation that uncovers the work of a shunned biologist and his daughter, whose life becomes entwined with the resurrected machine.

Terror of Mechagodzilla, aka Mekagojira no gyakushu, is Bill’s pick and even he is a bit surprised how little Godzilla is in the film. Even though Titanosaurus isn’t normally held in high regard, Bill thinks he’s a cool kaiju. Jeff is a relative newcomer to the world of Toho kaiju and he feels lucky to be shepherded through his introduction by the other members of the Grue-Crew. He gets into the campiness of Terror of Mechagodzilla, especially the fight scenes which seemed to him like a mashup of pro wrestling, boxing, and the Three Stooges. Chad loves all Godzilla films and sees him as emblematic of a good character that can be dropped into any situation – whether it be a comedy, child-oriented, or serious – and still tell a good story. He loves Terror of Mechagodzilla even though Godzilla does show up rather later in the story. Wacky aliens, a scientist that looks like Colonel Sanders, a robot daughter, and Godzilla appearing out of nowhere are all elements that pulled Doc into Terror of Mechagodzilla. He notes that even though this movie has a darker tone than recent Godzilla fare, it is still a lot of fun.

If you’re a fan of Godzilla, and we know you are, check out these other Decades of Horror podcasts on films from the Showa Era:

At the time of this writing, Terror of Mechagodzilla is available to stream from HBOmax, the Criterion Channel, tubi, and various other streaming services. In terms of physical media,  it is available in Godzilla: the Showa-Era Films, 1954–1975 (the Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray].

Gruesome Magazine’s Decades of Horror 1970s is part of the Decades of Horror two-week rotation with The Classic Era and the 1980s. In two weeks, the next episode in their very flexible schedule, chosen by Chad, will be The Island of Dr. Moreau (1977) from the H.G. Wells novel, starring Burt Lancaster, Micahel York, Barbara Carrera, Nigel Davenport, and Richard Basehart. 

We want to hear from you – the coolest, grooviest fans:  leave us a message or leave a comment on the site or email the Decades of Horror 1970s podcast hosts at feedback@gruesomemagazine.com. 

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